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Addressing NCTM standards, this second edition offers a wide range of practical writing strategies to help students deepen their understanding of mathematical concepts and theories.
This classic guide contains four essays on writing mathematical books and papers at the research level and at the level of graduate texts. The authors are all well known for their writing skills, as well as their mathematical accomplishments. The first essay, by Steenrod, discusses writing books, either monographs or textbooks. He gives both general and specific advice, getting into such details as the need for a good introduction. The longest essay is by Halmos, and contains many of the pieces of his advice that are repeated even today: In order to say something well you must have something to say; write for someone; think about the alphabet. Halmos's advice is systematic and practical. Schiffer addresses the issue by examining four types of mathematical writing: research paper, monograph, survey, and textbook, and gives advice for each form of exposition. Dieudonne's contribution is mostly a commentary on the earlier essays, with clear statements of where he disagrees with his coauthors. The advice in this small book will be useful to mathematicians at all levels.
Help learners in grades 1-8 get it "write" with practical strategies to help them write and understand mathematics content. This resource is designed in an easy-to-use format providing detailed strategies, graphic organizers, and activities with classroom examples by grade ranges. Specific suggestions for differentiating instruction are included with every strategy for various levels of readers and learning styles. This resource is correlated to the Common Core State Standards and is aligned to the interdisciplinary themes from the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. 208pp. plus Teacher Resource CD
This handy volume, enlivened by anecdotes, unusual paper titles, and humorous quotations, provides even more information on the issues you will face when writing a technical paper or talk, from choosing the right journal in which to publish to handling your references. Its overview of the entire publication process is invaluable for anyone hoping to publish in a technical journal.
This book will help those wishing to teach a course in technical writing, or who wish to write themselves.
This annual anthology brings together the year's finest mathematics writing from around the world. Featuring promising new voices alongside some of the foremost names in the field, The Best Writing on Mathematics 2016 makes available to a wide audience many articles not easily found anywhere else—and you don't need to be a mathematician to enjoy them. These writings offer surprising insights into the nature, meaning, and practice of mathematics today. They delve into the history, philosophy, teaching, and everyday occurrences of math, and take readers behind the scenes of today's hottest mathematical debates. Here Burkard Polster shows how to invent your own variants of the Spot It! card game, Steven Strogatz presents young Albert Einstein's proof of the Pythagorean Theorem, Joseph Dauben and Marjorie Senechal find a treasure trove of math in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Andrew Gelman explains why much scientific research based on statistical testing is spurious. In other essays, Brian Greene discusses the evolving assumptions of the physicists who developed the mathematical underpinnings of string theory, Jorge Almeida examines the misperceptions of people who attempt to predict lottery results, and Ian Stewart offers advice to authors who aspire to write successful math books for general readers. And there's much, much more. In addition to presenting the year's most memorable writings on mathematics, this must-have anthology includes a bibliography of other notable writings and an introduction by the editor, Mircea Pitici. This book belongs on the shelf of anyone interested in where math has taken us—and where it is headed.

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