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They bear labels instead of names—noncombatant, unintended victim, collateral damage. Theirs are the blurred faces and forms seen in news footage shot from a moving vehicle. And when soldiers, media, and profiteers move on to the next conflict, they stay behind to cope amid the wreckage. They have stories to tell to anyone who will pause long enough to hear them. In What Wars Leave Behind, J. Malcolm Garcia reveals the people and pain behind the statistics. He writes about impoverished families scraping by in Cairo’s city of the dead, ordinary Syrians pretending all is well as shells explode around them, and others caught in conflicts that rage long after the cameramen have packed up and gone away. Garcia describes his travels in some of the world’s hotspots in Central Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. In a series of personal travel essays that read like short stories, he exposes the endless messiness of war and the failings of good intentions, and he traces their impact on the lives of natives in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Egypt, Kosovo, Chad, and Syria. He discovers amazing resilience among people who must struggle just to survive each day. Garcia gives readers the sort of gritty detail learned from immersing himself in other cultures. He eats the food, drinks the tea, and endures the oppressive heat. These are the stories of how a middle-class guy from the Midwest with a social work degree learned to experience and embrace the cultures of Third World countries in conflict—and lived to tell the tale.
TheLARB Quarterly Journal Summer 2016 issue features established, and award winning writers. This issue highlights American poetry today, with a new work from National Book Award winner Nathaniel Mackey and other outstanding poets, including Peter Gizzi. Readers will also discover original short fiction by rising novelist Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi, who won accolades for her debut novel Fra Keeler, published through the innovative and quixotic Dorothy Project. TheLARB Quarterly Journal is a testament to the fact that print is thriving, as readers continue to have a profound appetite for curated, edited, smart and fun opinion, written by the best writers and thinkers of our time. These carefully selected articles, poems, interviews and essays appeal to readers with wide-ranging interests and a love for the literary. The new issue of theLARB Quarterly Journal includes: *Feature essays by Anthony McCann, Tom Stevenson, Diana del �ngel, David Biespiel, Nancy Jooyoun Kim. *Original poetry by Anna Rose Welch, Michael Klein, Joanna Klink, Richie Hofmann, Nathaniel Mackey, Peter Gizzi, Ari Banias, Diana Khoi Nguyen, Rachel Eliza Griffiths, *Short-takes by notable writers Paul Lisicky, J. Malcolm Garcia, and many others.
DIVA critical analysis of contemporary racial and sexual politics involved in post-9/11 laws and culture, where practices of liberal tolerance and the inclusion of gay, lesbian, homosexual, and queer subjects into the nation-state have developed into a type/div
The story of a young boy and his tragic fate in World War I makes a statement on the horrors of war and a plea for peace
A stunning literary thriller in the tradition of Umberto Eco. The discovery of a forgotten book leads to a hunt for an elusive author who may or may not still be alive... Hidden in the heart of the old city of Barcelona is the 'cemetery of lost books', a labyrinthine library of obscure and forgotten titles that have long gone out of print. To this library, a man brings his 10-year-old son Daniel one cold morning in 1945. Daniel is allowed to choose one book from the shelves and pulls out 'La Sombra del Viento' by Julian Carax. But as he grows up, several people seem inordinately interested in his find. Then, one night, as he is wandering the old streets once more, Daniel is approached by a figure who reminds him of a character from La Sombra del Viento, a character who turns out to be the devil. This man is tracking down every last copy of Carax's work in order to burn them. What begins as a case of literary curiosity turns into a race to find out the truth behind the life and death of Julian Carax and to save those he left behind. A page-turning exploration of obsession in literature and love, and the places that obsession can lead.
Remembering Hiroshima, the city obliterated by the world's first nuclear attack, has been a complicated and intensely politicized process, as we learn from Lisa Yoneyama's sensitive investigation of the "dialectics of memory." She explores unconventional texts and dimensions of culture involved in constituting Hiroshima memories--including history textbook controversies, discourses on the city's tourism and urban renewal projects, campaigns to preserve atomic ruins, survivors' testimonial practices, ethnic Koreans' narratives on Japanese colonialism, and the feminized discourse on peace--in order to illuminate the politics of knowledge about the past and present. In the way battles over memories have been expressed as material struggles over the cityscape itself, we see that not all share the dominant remembering of Hiroshima's disaster, with its particular sense of pastness, nostalgia, and modernity. The politics of remembering, in Yoneyama's analysis, is constituted by multiple and contradictory senses of time, space, and positionality, elements that have been profoundly conditioned by late capitalism and intensifying awareness of post-Cold War and postcolonial realities. Hiroshima Traces, besides clarifying the discourse surrounding this unforgotten catastrophe, reflects on questions that accompany any attempts to recover marginalized or silenced experiences. At a time when historical memories around the globe appear simultaneously threatening and in danger of obliteration, Yoneyama asks how acts of remembrance can serve the cause of knowledge without being co-opted and deprived of their unsettling, self-critical qualities.

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