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Completely revised and updated, the new edition of this groundbreaking text integrates basic virology with pathophysiological conditions to examine the connection between virology and human disease. Most virology textbooks focus on the molecular biology involved without adequate reference to physiology. This text focuses on viruses that infect humans, domestic animals and vertebrates and is based on extensive course notes from James Strauss’ virology class at the California Institute of Technology taught for over 30 years. Expertly depicting in color the molecular structure and replication of each virus, it provides an excellent overview for students and professionals interested in viruses as agents of human disease. Includes over 30% new material - virtually all of the figures and tables have been redrawn to include the latest information and the text has been extensively rewritten to include the most up-to-date information Includes a new chapter on emerging and reemerging viral diseases such as avian flu, SARS, the spread of West Nile virus across America, and the continuing spread of Nipah virus in Southeast Asia Further reading sections at the end of each chapter make it easy find key references World maps depicting the current distribution of existing and newly emerging viruses are also incorporated into the text
This is the first text to examine the connection between virology and human disease. It is also the first book to integrate basic virology with pathophysiological conditions. By contrast, most virology textbooks focus on the molecular biology involved without adequate reference to physiology. Viruses and Human Disease is four-color throughout and contains clearly labeled figures and tables. Key Features *Provides a concise overview of animal viruses, emphasizing those causing diseases in humans; * Integrates discussion of molecular biology, epidemiology, and the history of human viruses; * Presents treatment of prions, gene therapy, and vaccine development; * Illustrated in color by an expert virologist; * Includes world maps depicting the current distribution of existing and newly emerging viruses
Completely revised and updated, the new edition of this groundbreaking text integrates basic virology with pathophysiological conditions to examine the connection between virology and human disease. Most virology textbooks focus on the molecular biology involved without adequate reference to physiology. This text focuses on viruses that infect humans, domestic animals and vertebrates and is based on extensive course notes from James Strauss' virology class at the California Institute of Technology taught for over 30 years. Expertly depicting in color the molecular structure and replication of each virus, it provides an excellent overview for students and professionals interested in viruses as agents of human disease. * Includes over 30% new material - virtually all of the figures and tables have been redrawn to include the latest information and the text has been extensively rewritten to include the most up-to-date information * Includes a new chapter on emerging and reemerging viral diseases such as avian flu, SARS, the spread of West Nile virus across America, and the continuing spread of Nipah virus in Southeast Asia. * Further reading sections at the end of each chapter make it easy find key references * World maps depicting the current distribution of existing and newly emerging viruses are also incorporated into the text * A companion website features illustrations for use in class notes and presentations.
Facts101 is your complete guide to Viruses and Human Disease. In this book, you will learn topics such as Plus-Strand RNA Viruses, Minus-Strand RNA Viruses, Viruses That Contain Double-Stranded RNA: Family Reoviridae, and Viruses Whose Life Cycle Uses Reverse Transcriptase plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
Science never solves apr oblem without creating ten more Geor ge Bernard Shaw How prophetic the above words prove to be when applied to the advances of 20th century medicine. Prior to Banting and Best, chnicians were unaware of the ravages of diabetes, patients simply wasted away and died. Following the purifica tion of insulin, clinicians now had to deal with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neph ropathy and all the other complications of long-term diabetes. A little over 50 years ago, the first successful human kidney transplant was performed in Boston. The first 30 years of the experience had successes when compared to the alternative but were a constant struggle to get even 50% of the grafts from deceased donors to survive more than a year. However, the science continued to advance knowledge of the immune response. With this came more and increasingly powerful tools for the clinician. Suddenly, success rates of 80-90% at one year were attainable. With this success came new problems, new complications and clinicians now had to worry about the long-term consequences of their therapy as patients were surviving with functional grafts for extended periods. A particular infectious complication evolved with the application of ever more powerful immunosuppressant drugs. Astute clinicians noted that occasionally cellular rejections seemed to get worse with steroids. Despite their best efforts and the use of powerful drugs, patients lost their grafts to overwhelming interstitial infiltrates not seen before.
Recent interest in new diseases, such as HIV/AIDS and Ebola, and the resurgence of older diseases like tuberculosis has fostered questions about the history of human infectious diseases. How did they evolve? Where did they originate? What natural factors have stalled the progression of diseases or made them possible? How does a microorganism become a pathogen? How have infectious diseases changed through time? What can we do to control their occurrence? Ethne Barnes offers answers to these questions, using information from history and medicine as well as from anthropology. She focuses on changes in the patterns of human behavior through cultural evolution and how they have affected the development of human diseases. Writing in a clear, lively style, Barnes offers general overviews of every variety of disease and their carriers, from insects and worms through rodent vectors to household pets and farm animals. She devotes whole chapters to major infectious diseases such as leprosy, syphilis, smallpox, and influenza. Other chapters concentrate on categories of diseases ("gut bugs," for example, including cholera, typhus, and salmonella). The final chapters cover diseases that have made headlines in recent years, among them mad cow disease, West Nile virus, and Lyme disease. In the tradition of Berton Roueché, Hans Zinsser, and Sherwin Nuland, Ethne Barnes answers questions you never knew you had about the germs that have threatened us throughout human history.
Pathobiology of Human Disease bridges traditional morphologic and clinical pathology, molecular pathology, and the underlying basic science fields of cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology, which have opened up a new era of research in pathology and underlie the molecular basis of human disease. The work spans more than 48 different biological and medical fields, in five basic sections: Human Organ Systems Molecular Pathology/Basic Mechanisms of Diseases Animal Models/Other Model Systems Experimental Pathology Clinical Pathology Each article provides a comprehensive overview of the selected topic to inform a broad spectrum of readers from research professionals to advanced undergraduate students. Reviews quantitative advances in the imaging and molecular analysis of human tissue, new microarray technologies for analysis of genetic and chromosomal alterations in normal and diseased cells and tissues, and new transgenic models of human disease using conditional, tissue-specific gene targeting Articles link through to relevant virtual microscopy slides, illustrating side-by-side presentation of "Normal" and "Disease" anatomy and histology images Fully-annotated with many supplementary full color images, graphs, tables, and video files linked to data sets and to live references, enabling researchers to delve deeper and visualize solutions

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