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This book is concerned with the origins of the often difficult relationship between the Metropolitan Police and London's West Indian community, and is the first detailed account of the relationship between them during the crucial early decades of largescale immigration. It shows how and why the early seeds of mistrust between police and black immigrants were sown, culminating in the subsequent riots and public enquiries - in particular the Scarman and MacPherson enquiries. Drawing upon a wide range of interviews as well as detailed archival research, this book also sheds new light on the relationship between the Home Secretary and the Metropolitan Police Commissioner in the post-war period, the cultures and subcultures within the Met and the different priorities to be found within its rank structure; the nature of cultural and ethnic prejudice in the Met at the time; its self-imposed alienation from the community it served; and the Met's lack of commitment at the highest level to community and race relations training. All these issues are examined in the broader context of British society in the 1950s and 1960s, providing a prism through which to explore the broader context of race relations in Britain in the post-war period.
Contains abstracts of missiological contributions, book reviews, and articles.
The struggle which Plato has Socrates recommend to his interlocutors in Gorgias - and to his readers - is the struggle to overcome the temptations of worldly success and to concentrate on genuine morality. Ostensibly an enquiry into the value of rhetoric, the dialogue soon becomes an investigation into the value of these two contrasting ways of life. In a series of dazzling and bold arguments, Plato attempts to establish that only morality can bring a person true happiness, and to demolish alternative viewpoints. It is not suprising that Gorgias is one of Plato's most widely read dialogues. Philosophers read it for its coverage of central moral issues; others enjoy its vividness, clarity and occasional bitter humour. This new translation is accompanied by explanatory notes and an informative introduction.

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