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Developmental language disorders (DLD) occur when a child fails to develop his or her native language often for no apparent reason. Delayed development of speech and/or language is one of the most common reasons for parents of preschool children to seek the advice of their family doctor. Although some children rapidly improve, others have more persistent language difficulties. These long-term deficits can adversely affect academic progress, social relationships and mental well-being. Although DLDs are common, we are still a long way from understanding what causes them and how best to intervene. Understanding Developmental Language Disorders summarises the recent research developments in genetics and neuroimaging studies, assessment techniques and treatment studies to provide an overview of all aspects of DLD. The book investigates the possible genetic and biological causes of the disorder, how best to assess children's language skills to identify when and where communication breakdown occurs, what the long-term outcomes are for children who grow up with DLD, overlaps between DLD and other childhood disorders such as dyslexia and autism and how best to treat children with the disorder. Each chapter is written by a leading authority in the field in a format accessible to researchers, clinicians and families alike. This book, with its focus on both theory and practice, will be invaluable to students and researchers of speech-language pathology, psychology, psychiatry, linguistics and education. It will also be of interest to practicing speech-language pathologists, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, educational psychologists, and teachers and parents of children with developmental language disorders.
"This is a "classic edition" of Dorothy Bishop's award-winning text on the development of language comprehension, which has been in print since 1997 and now includes a new introduction from the author. It integrates research in language acquisition, psycholinguistics and neuropsychology to give a comprehensive picture of the process we call "comprehension". A major theme in the book is that "comprehension" is not a unitary skill; to understand spoken language, one needs the ability to classify incoming speech sounds, to relate them to a "mental lexicon", to interpret the propositions encoded by word order and grammatical inflections, and to use information from the environmental and social context to select, from a wide range of possible interpretations, the one that was intended by the speaker. Furthermore, although neuropsychological and experimental research on adult comprehension can provide useful concepts and methods for assessing comprehension, they should be applied with caution, because a sequential, bottom-up information processing model of comprehension is ill-suited to the developmental context. The emphasis of this book is on children with specific language impairments, but normal development is also given extensive coverage. The focus is on research and theory, rather than practical matters of assessment and intervention. Nevertheless, it does provide a theoretical framework that can help clinicians develop a clearer understanding of what comprehension involves, and how different types of difficulty may be pinpointed"--
A great deal has been written on how children learn to speak, but development of language comprehension has been a relatively neglected topic. This book is unique in integrating research in language acquisition, psycholinguistics and neuropsychology to give a comprehensive picture of the process we call "comprehension", right from the reception of an acoustic stimulus at the ear, up to the point where we interpret the message the speaker intended to convey by the utterance. A major theme of the book is that "comprehension" is not a unitary skill: to understand spoken language, one needs the ability to classify incoming speech sounds, to relate them to a "mental lexicon", to interpret the propositions encoded by word order and grammatical inflections, and to use information from the environmental and social context to select, from a wide range of possible interpretations, the one that was intended by the speaker. Furthermore, although neuropsychological and experimental research on adult comprehension can provide useful concepts and methods for assessing comprehension, they should be applied with caution, because a sequential, bottom-up information processing model of comprehension is ill-suited to the developmental context. The emphasis of the book is on children with specific language impairments, but normal development is also given extensive coverage. The focus is on research and theory, rather than practical matters of assessment and intervention. Nevertheless, while this book is not intended as a clinical guide to assessment, it does aim to provide a theoretical framework that can help clinicians develop a clearer understanding of what comprehension involves, and how different types of difficulty may be pinpointed.
Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence, 4th Edition is the go-to text for all the information you need to properly assess childhood language disorders and provide appropriate treatment. This core resource spans the entire developmental period through adolescence, and uses a descriptive-developmental approach to present basic concepts and vocabulary, an overview of key issues and controversies, the scope of communicative difficulties that make up child language disorders, and information on how language pathologists approach the assessment and intervention processes. This new edition also features significant updates in research, trends, instruction best practices, and social skills assessment. Comprehensive text covers the entire developmental period through adolescence. Clinical application focus featuring case studies, clinical vignettes, and suggested projects helps you apply concepts to professional practice. Straightforward, conversational writing style makes this book easy to read and understand. More than 230 tables and boxes summarize important information such as dialogue examples, sample assessment plans, assessment and intervention principles, activities, and sample transcripts. UNIQUE! Practice exercises with sample transcripts allow you to apply different methods of analysis. UNIQUE! Helpful study guides at the end of each chapter help you review and apply what you have learned. Versatile text is perfect for a variety of language disorder courses, and serves as a great reference tool for professional practitioners. Highly regarded lead author Rhea Paul lends her expertise in diagnosing and managing pediatric language disorders. Communication development milestones are printed on the inside front cover for quick access. Chapter objectives summarize what you can expect to learn in each chapter. Updated content features the latest research, theories, trends and techniques in the field. Information on autism incorporated throughout the text Best practices in preliteracy and literacy instruction The role of the speech-language pathologist on school literacy teams and in response to intervention New reference sources Student/Professional Resources on Evolve include an image bank, video clips, and references linked to PubMed.
Children and adolescents with emotional and behavioural problems who are referred to mental health services for assessment often have undiagnosed mild learning disabilities, and this guide is written for clinicians involved in making such assessments. It provides full guidance on common developmental disorders and their assessment, focusing on mild to moderate disabilities in the school-aged child. It covers intellectual disabilities, dyslexia, dyscalculia (mathematical disability), autism spectrum disorders, speech and language impairment, developmental coordination disorder, and emotional and personality development. Each chapter includes an account of normal development, including developmental milestones, an overview of the disorder, and its clinical assessment. This important professional guide will be invaluable for all child health and mental health professionals and trainees, including paediatricians, psychiatrists, mental health workers, clinical psychologists and educational psychologists.
A volume in Research on Sociocultural Influences on Motivation and Learning Series Editor: Dennis M. McInerney, The Hong Kong Institute of Education Auditory processing disorders, reading and writing disorders, language disorders, and other related disorders - these disorders seem distinct among one another from historical and professional practice perspectives but more and more research suggests that they in fact overlap in many ways including clinical presentations, suspected underlying causes, diagnostic criteria, and re/habilitation strategies. On January 4-7, 2012, the conference Global Conference on Disorders in Auditory Processing, Literacy, Language & Related Sciences (APLL 2012) was held in The Hong Kong Institute of Education. This was the world's first platform for interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations on ways we can better serve children who suffer from the above closely related disorders through future research. Due to the huge success of APLL2012, to promote continuous discussions of the conference theme, the conference organizing committee decided to invite scholars, scientists, and practitioners to contribute their work to the eleventh volume in the Research on Sociocultural Influences on Motivation and Learning research monograph series. This volume is focused on issues in typical and disordered developments in auditory processing, literacy, and language across different cultural and linguistic contexts in Asia, Europe and North America. The contributors of this volume offer insightful theoretical and practical ideas to shape future directions in research, assessment, intervention, and education. This is an intriguing and inspiring volume for students, researchers, and practitioners in the fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, developmental psychology, educational psychology, neuropsychology, and other related disciplines. By bringing in respective leaders in the fields, we hope that this book will open new windows to promote advancements in related research initiatives, continuing cross disciplinary discussions and collaborations on ways that we can better service individuals suffer from these closely related disorders through future research.

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