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The rules of treaty interpretation codified in the 'Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties' now apply to virtually all treaties, in an international context as well as within national legal systems, where treaties have an impact on a large and growing range of matters. The rules of treaty interpretation differ somewhat from typical rules for interpreting legal instruments and legislation within national legal systems. Lawyers, administrators, diplomats, and officials at international organisations are increasingly likely to encounter issues of treaty interpretation which require not only knowledge of the relevant rules of interpretation, but also how these rules have been, and are to be, applied in practice. Since the codified rules of treaty interpretation came into decree, there is a considerable body of case-law on their application. This case-law, combined with the history and analysis of the rules of treaty interpretation, provides a basis for understanding this most important task in the application of treaties internationally and within national systems of law. Any lawyer who ever has to consider international matters, and increasingly any lawyer whose work involves domestic legislation with any international connection, is at risk nowadays of encountering a treaty provision which requires interpretation, whether the treaty provision is explicitly in issue or is the source of the relevant domestic legislation. This fully updated new edition features case law from a broader range of jurisdictions, and an account of the work of the International Law Commission in its relation to interpretative declarations. This book provides a guide to interpreting treaties properly in accordance with the modern rules.
New to this edition: Additional chapter on the consequences of treaty violations and the determination of damages in investor state disputes - Covers all treaties and free trade agreements that have been negotiated since the first edition - Includes analysis of trends from treaty negotiation
International criminal law has seen significant developments in recent years, as the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Court has expanded, alongside the practice of other international criminal tribunals. International criminal law is increasingly a concern of domestic courts as well, with international legal issues arising from domestic cases. This book presents a comprehensive overview of the field, assessing the subject in the context of wider public international law. In particular, this book complements discussion of the 'core crimes' of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, with a full treatment of wider issues that arise. These include the international rules governing national criminal jurisdiction; the crime of piracy; the raft of multilateral treaties defining and creating obligations in respect of international crimes, including terrorist crimes, and of the so-far unsuccessful attempts to conclude a comprehensive convention on terrorism; the prosecution and punishment of international crimes at the national level; and the activities of the United Nations Security Council in relation to international crimes.This book provides an in-depth study of the ways in which domestic courts prosecute international crimes. Its analysis encompasses the international rules on the permissible reach of national criminal jurisdiction; the substantive law of international crimes; the prosecution and punishment of international crimes, and the prosecution and punishment of municipal crimes by international criminal courts or by municipal courts with international elements; and the involvement of international organs, such as the United Nations Security Council, in the suppression of international and municipal criminal wrongdoing. The book also includes more formal conceptual analysis of the very notion of an 'international crime' and of an 'international criminal tribunal', as well as a detailed account of the rise of individual criminal responsibility under international law. The book is written in a direct, concise, and precise style, making it a perfect resource for ICL practitioners, as well as scholars and advanced students.
This new edition of a textbook first published in 2000 provides a comprehensive account of the law of treaties from the viewpoint of an experienced practitioner. As such, it is the first, and only, book of its kind. Aust provides a wealth of examples of the problems experienced with treaties on a daily basis, not just when they are the subject of a court case. He explores numerous precedents from treaties and other related documents, such as memorandums of understanding (MOUs), in detail. Using clear, accessible language, the author covers the full extent of treaty law, drawing examples from both treaties and MOUs. Modern Treaty Law and Practice is essential reading for teachers and students of law, political science, international relations and diplomacy, who have an interest in treaties.
International lawyers have long recognised the importance of interpretation to their academic discipline and professional practice. As new insights on interpretation abound in other fields, international law and international lawyers have largely remained wedded to a rule-based approach, focusing almost exclusively on the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. Such an approach neglects interpretation as a distinct and broader field of theoretical inquiry. Interpretation in International Law brings international legal scholars together to engage in sustained reflection on the theme of interpretation. The book is creatively structured around the metaphor of the game, which captures and illuminates the constituent elements of an act of interpretation. The object of the game of interpretation is to persuade the audience that one's interpretation of the law is correct. The rules of play are known and complied with by the players, even though much is left to their skills and strategies. There is also a meta-discourse about the game of interpretation - 'playing the game of game-playing' - which involves consideration of the nature of the game, its underlying stakes, and who gets to decide by what rules one should play. Through a series of diverse contributions, Interpretation in International Law reveals interpretation as an inescapable feature of all areas of international law. It will be of interest and utility to all international lawyers whose work touches upon theoretical or practical aspects of interpretation.
This Oxford Handbook provides an authoritative and comprehensive analysis of one of the most controversial areas of international law. Over seventy contributors assess the current state of the international law prohibiting the use of force, assessing its development and analysing the many recent controversies that have arisen in this field.
Peoples and minorities in many parts of the world assert a right to self-determination, autonomy, and even secession from a state, which naturally conflicts with that state's sovereignty and territorial integrity. The right of a people to self-determination and secession has existed as a concept within international law since the American Declaration of Independence in 1776, but the exact definition of these concepts, and the conditions required for their application, remain unclear. The Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice concerning the Declaration of Independency of Kosovo (2010), which held that the Kosovo declaration of independence was not in violation of international law, has only led to further questions. This book takes four conflicts in the post-Soviet Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) as a starting point for examining the current state of the law of self-determination and secession. Four entities, Transnistria (Moldova), South Ossetia, Abkhazia (both Georgia), and Nagorno-Karabakh (Armenia), claim to be entitled not only to self-determination but also to secession from their mother state. For this entitlement they rely on historic affiliations, and on charges of discrimination and massive human rights violations committed by their mother state. This book sets out its analysis of these critical issue in three parts, providing a detailed understanding of the principles of international law on which they rely: The first part sets out the contours and meaning of self-determination and secession, including an overall assessment of secession within the Commonwealth of Independent States. The second section provides case studies investigating the events in Transnistria, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, and Nagorno-Karabach in greater detail. The third and final section extends the scope of the examination, providing a comparative analysis of similar conflicts involving questions of self-determination and secession in Kosovo, Western Sahara, and Eritrea.

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