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Transparency of the European Union's institutions has engendered much law over the last ten years. This handbook is the first publication to provide a comprehensive practical overview of these rules. Moreover, the author discusses in detail the practice that has developed within the institutions in applying them. Transparency in EU Institutional Law - A Practitioner's Handbookwill be of interest to anyone who needs to access documentation from any of the EU institutions and to EU officials obliged to apply the law. In addition to giving a comprehensive overview on the law relating to public access to documents, the author discusses in detail other aspects of transparency in the European Union, such as the rules on lobbying, the public Council meetings, and requests for information.
Research Handbook on EU Institutional Law offers a critical look into the European Union: its legal foundations, competences and institutions. It provides an analysis of the EU legal system, its application at the national level and the prevalent role of the Court of Justice. Throughout the course of the Handbook the expert contributors discuss whether the European Union is well equipped for the 21st century and the numerous crises it has to handle. They revisit the call for an EU reform made in the Laeken Conclusions in 2001 to verify if its objectives have been achieved by the Treaty of Lisbon and in daily practice of the EU institutions. The book also delves into the concept of a Europe of different speeds, which - according to some - is inevitable in the EU comprising 28 Member States. Overall, the assessment of the changes introduced by the Lisbon Treaty is positive, even if there are plenty of suggestions for further reforms to re-fit the EU for purpose.
There is much confusion over the 'Constitution', and this book provides an in-depth legal analysis of the institutional aspects of the Constitutional Treaty which, if ratified by the 25 EU Member States, would govern the European Union. Piris argues that, despite its ratification being rejected by the French and the Netherlands referenda in 2005, the Treaty should not be discarded, as it will inevitably be the point of departure for the future of European integration. He places this analysis in an historical and political context and explains the origin, meanings and legal and political effects of all proposed changes to the present treaties.
Now in its twelfth edition, Steiner & Woods EU Law is rightfully regarded as one of the best and most trusted EU law textbooks available. The book includes a well-balanced range of topics for students taking an EU law course at any level. It offers a careful blend of institutional and substantive coverage and focuses on explaining the law clearly for student readers, as well as raising areas of debate to inform class discussion and essays. Case detail is clearly sign-posted throughout the text, including excerpts from leading judgements, while diagrams distil complex tests and procedures to visually represent the workings of the EU. End of chapter reading suggestions plus a detailed bibliography provide a helpful starting point for essay preparation and independent research. Online Resource Centre The book is accompanied by a free Online Resource Centre (www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/orc/steiner_woods12e/)which includes the following features: - Self-test questions with instant feedback, ideal for revision - Flashcard glossary of key terms in EU law - Downloadable versions of the figures from the text for use in notes and revision - Interactive map and timeline of the EU and its development - Video clips of key moments in the EU's history and essential EU procedures
In March 2010, the European Higher Education Area was officially launched, proclaiming the culmination of a ten-year timeframe projected at Bologna in 1999, when the education ministers of 29 European states signed a declaration that would fundamentally influence the future of their higher education systems. Forty-seven countries, including all EU Member States and other countries as far afield as Kazakhstan, now take part in the so-called 'Bologna Process'. Remarkably, this vast enterprise, which has led to rapid and sweeping changes in almost all higher education systems in Europe, has taken place outside the framework of the European Union and the Council of Europe. In fact, as this important legal analysis shows, it appears that with the Bologna Process the Member States have tried to sidestep the EU's growing influence on higher education. Although the Bologna Process has generated an impressive literature addressing what it might mean, where it suddenly came from, and how it has become so powerful, until now the legal implications of the process, and its tense relationship with EU law, have been left almost entirely unexamined. This work fills that gap. Among the often controversial issues raised are the following: ; avoidance of the democratically legitimate procedures of the EU's institutional framework for cultural reasons connected with state sovereignty; the scope of EU legal competence for various kinds of activities in the educational sector; specific areas of overlap between EU law and the Bologna Process and their implications; voluntary intergovernmental cooperation as a paradigmatic global shift of internationalization policies in education; the idea that the university is being redefined, from a social institution to an industry; the increasingly influential role in the process, by means of funding and coordination, of the European Commission; financial support programmes and devices to enhance credit and degree recognition; students as recipients of services; and teachers and the free movement of workers. The author describes how the scope of the Bologna Process was significantly broadened during a series of meetings during the decade, analyses the relevance of the case law of the European Court of Justice and provides a detailed description of the adoption of the process into the national laws of France, Germany and the United Kingdom. A concluding normative assessment scrutinizes the process on the basis of democracy, transparency and accountability. As the first study of the legitimacy of Bologna from a European law perspective - and by extension of the 'Europeanization' of higher education, including the role of the EU, EU law, and law in general - this is a critically important contribution to a contentious debate that clearly holds great significance for the future of law and society. Educators and education policymakers are sure to read and study it with interest.
'Transparency' has become both a catch-word in public debate and also an important research topic. Comprised of authoritative yet accessible contributions, this handbook surveys existing economic research on transparency and provides an up-to-date account of its meaning and significance in economic policy, market integration and regulation, and corporate governance and disclosure.

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