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Offers strategies and ideas for helping children learn scientific concepts through tinkering, and provides instructions for making such objects as a plastic cup torsion drum, catapults, a tornado in a bottle, and magnetic toys.
How can you consistently pull off hands-on tinkering with kids? How do you deal with questions that you can't answer? How do you know if tinkering kids are learning anything or not? Is there a line between fooling around with real stuff and learning? The idea of learning through tinkering is not so radical. From the dawn of time, whenever humanity has wanted to know more, we have achieved it most effectively by getting our hands dirty and making careful observations of real stuff. Make: Tinkering (Kids Learn by Making Stuff) lets you discover how, why--and even what it is--to tinker and tinker well. Author Curt Gabrielson draws on more than 20 years of experience doing hands-on science to facilitate tinkering: learning science while fooling around with real things. This book shows you how to make: A drum set from plastic bottles, tape, and shrink-wrap Magnetic toys that dance, sway, and amaze Catapults, ball launchers, and table-top basketball A battery-powered magic wand and a steadiness game (don't touch the sides!) Chemical reactions with household items Models of bones and tendons that work like real arms and ankles Spin art machine and a hovercraft from a paper plate! Lifelong learners hungry for their next genuine experience
Now in hardcover, this practical guide has become known worldwide as the "bible of the classroom maker movement." It provides K-12 educators with the how, why, and cool stuff that supports every classroom becoming a makerspace where kids and teachers learn together through direct experience with an assortment of high and low-tech materials.
Making Simple Robots is based on one idea: Anybody can build a robot! That includes kids, school teachers, parents, and non-engineers. If you can knit, sew, or fold a flat piece of paper into a box, you can build a no-tech robotic part. If you can use a hot glue gun, you can learn to solder basic electronics into a low-tech robot that reacts to its environment. And if you can figure out how to use the apps on your smart phone, you can learn enough programming to communicate with a simple robot. Written in language that non-engineers can understand, Making Simple Robots helps beginners move beyond basic craft skills and materials to the latest products and tools being used by artists and inventors. Find out how to animate folded paper origami, design a versatile robot wheel-leg for 3D printing, or program a rag doll to blink its cyborg eye. Each project includes step-by-step directions as well as clear diagrams and photographs. And every chapter offers suggestions for modifying and expanding the projects, so that you can return to the projects again and again as your skill set grows.
Why do the lights in a house turn on when you flip a switch? How does a remote-controlled car move? And what makes lights on TVs and microwaves blink? The technology around you may seem like magic, but most of it wouldn’t run without electricity. Electronics for Kids demystifies electricity with a collection of awesome hands-on projects. In Part 1, you’ll learn how current, voltage, and circuits work by making a battery out of a lemon, turning a metal bolt into an electromagnet, and transforming a paper cup and some magnets into a spinning motor. In Part 2, you’ll make even more cool stuff as you: *Solder a blinking LED circuit with resistors, capacitors, and relays *Turn a circuit into a touch sensor using your finger as a resistor *Build an alarm clock triggered by the sunrise *Create a musical instrument that makes sci-fi sounds Then, in Part 3, you’ll learn about digital electronics—things like logic gates and memory circuits—as you make a secret code checker and an electronic coin flipper. Finally, you’ll use everything you’ve learned to make the LED Reaction Game—test your reaction time as you try to catch a blinking light! With its clear explanations and assortment of hands-on projects, Electronics for Kids will have you building your own circuits in no time.
Instructions for making 24 toys and musical instruments. Projects introduce the beginner to fundamental sewing and carpentry skills; how to use tools like an electronic drill, a soldering iron, and a blowtorch; and the basics of circuit-building.
Dale Dougherty, creator of MAKE: magazine and the Maker Faire, provides a guided tour of the international phenomenon known as the Maker Movement, a social revolution that is changing what gets made, how it’s made, where it’s made, and who makes it. Free to Make is a call to join what Dougherty calls the “renaissance of making,” an invitation to see ourselves as creators and shapers of the world around us. As the internet thrives and world-changing technologies—like 3D printers and tiny microcontrollers—become increasingly affordable, people around the world are moving away from the passivity of one-size-fits-all consumption and command-and-control models of education and business. Free to Make explores how making revives abandoned and neglected urban areas, reinvigorates community spaces like libraries and museums, and even impacts our personal and social development—fostering a mindset that is engaged, playful, and resourceful. Free to Make asks us to imagine a world where making is an everyday occurrence in our schools, workplaces, and local communities, grounding us in the physical world and empowering us to solve the challenges we face.

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