Download Free The Unwanted Sound Of Everything We Want A Book About Noise Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Unwanted Sound Of Everything We Want A Book About Noise and write the review.

Noise is usually defined as unwanted sound: loud music from a neighbor, the honk of a taxicab, the roar of a supersonic jet. But as Garret Keizer illustrates in this probing examination, noise is as much about what we want as about what we seek to avoid. In a journey that leads us from the primeval Tanzanian veldt to wind farms in Maine, Keizer invites us to listen to noise in history, in popular culture, and not least of all in our own backyards. He follows noise throughout history and across the globe. He considers what it has to tell us about today’s most pressing issues, from social inequality to climate change. The result is guaranteed to change how we hear the world, and how we measure our own personal volume within it.
Noise is usually defined as unwanted sound: loud music from a neighbor, the honk of a taxicab, the roar of a supersonic jet. But as Garret Keizer illustrates in this probing examination, noise is as much about what we want as about what we seek to avoid. In a journey that leads us from the primeval Tanzanian veldt to wind farms in Maine, Keizer invites us to listen to noise in history, in popular culture, and not least of all in our own backyards. He follows noise throughout history and across the globe. He considers what it has to tell us about today’s most pressing issues, from social inequality to climate change. The result is guaranteed to change how we hear the world, and how we measure our own personal volume within it.
What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduate students who are interested in the mathematical representation of signals and the applications of Fourier analysis. The book can be described as being practically self-contained but does assume readers are familiar with introductory topics in discrete signal processing, as in the discrete Fourier transform. Hence this book might be also usable as a textbook in graduate courses in applied mathematics on topics such as complex functions. Almost all scientific phenomena are sensed as waves propagating in some space. Over the years, waveform analysis has therefore been one of the resilient academic areas of study and still is seen as fertile ground for development. In particular, waveform analysis based on the theory of linear systems would be a good example where a physical interpretation can be given to the mathematical theory of complex functions in terms of magnitude, angle, poles, and zeros of complex functions. For readers who are interested in the physical aspects of sound and vibration data or elementary formulation of wave equations and their solutions, the book Sound and Signals by M. Tohyama (Springer 2011) is recommended. It can serve as a complementary companion to this present volume or independently as a good reference.
American essayist and Harper's contributing editor Garret Keizer offers a brilliant, literate look at our strip-searched, over-shared, viral-videoed existence. Body scans at the airport, candid pics on Facebook, a Twitter account for your stray thoughts, and a surveillance camera on every street corner -- today we have an audience for all of the extraordinary and banal events of our lives. The threshold between privacy and exposure becomes more permeable by the minute. But what happens to our private selves when we cannot escape scrutiny, and to our public personas when they pass from our control? In this wide-ranging, penetrating addition to the Big Ideas//Small Books series, and in his own unmistakable voice, Garret Keizer considers the moral dimensions of privacy in relation to issues of social justice, economic inequality, and the increasing commoditization of the global marketplace. Though acutely aware of the digital threat to privacy rights, Keizer refuses to see privacy in purely technological terms or as an essentially legalistic value. Instead, he locates privacy in the human capacity for resistance and in the sustainable society "with liberty and justice for all."
Examines why society began to be so loud, what it is that gets lost when one can no longer find quiet, and the benefits of decluttering our sonic world.
A professor of acoustic engineering provides a tour of the world's most amazing sound phenomena, including creaking glaciers, whispering galleries, stalactite organs, musical roads, humming dunes, seals that sound like alien angels, and a Mayan pyramid that chirps like a bird.
A Christopher Award-winning story of Keizer's experiences teaching in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom.

Best Books