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IT'S NOT EVERY DAY YOU LEARN YOU HAVE A NINE-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER Boston Kincaid's life is forever changed when he reads the note from Cassidy Trenton, who's looking for her daddy. Vividly remembering the girl's mother, Boston is compelled to learn the truth about Cassidy's paternity. Single working mother Ellie Trenton is completely bowled over to find her old college flame, whom she hasn't seen in ten years, loitering on her front porch when she comes home from work one day. At the sight of each other, Boston and Ellie's decade apart melts away, and that old chemistry between them flares back to life. But trust doesn't come easily, and old wounds never healed properly. Can Boston and Ellie learn to forgive and forget so they can experience the love they never shared, or will child custody battles keep them apart forever'
Ten years ago, an oil tycoon's daughter and a farmer's son shared a moment neither would ever forget. When she left town in disgrace, a piece of her stayed locked deep within his soul. And like the ground he tended, his emotions lay fallow for years. Cooper Gerhardt's deeply buried feelings for Jo Ellen Rawlings grew more fertile over time, just waiting for the day she would return to release his deepest desires. When she strolls back into Tommy Creek, Texas for her ten-year class reunion, Cooper shows her farm boy style exactly what she missed by leaving. Starting a short-term affair is simply unavoidable. But when the week is over, can either of them let go of the responsibilities and apprehensions keeping them apart? Or will their fallow hearts learn to flourish together?
When Georgia, an eight-year-old girl, cuts her hair very short and plays baseball the children in her new school ask her if she's a boy.
Growing up, Liz Prince wasn't a girly girl, dressing in pink tutus or playing Pretty Pretty princess like the other girls in her neighborhood. But she wasn't exactly one of the guys either, as she quickly learned when her Little League baseball coach exiled her to the outfield instead of letting her take the pitcher's mound. Liz was somewhere in the middle, and Tomboy is the story of her struggle to find the place where she belonged. Tomboy is a graphic novel about refusing gender boundaries, yet unwittingly embracing gender stereotypes at the same time, and realizing later in life that you can be just as much of a girl in jeans and a T-shirt as you can in a pink tutu. A memoir told anecdotally, Tomboy follows author and zine artist Liz Prince through her early childhood into adulthood and explores her ever-evolving struggles and wishes regarding what it means to "be a girl." From staunchly refuting anything she perceived as being "girly" to the point of misogyny, to discovering through the punk community that your identity is whatever you make of it, regardless of your gender, Tomboy is as much humorous and honest as it is at points uncomfortable and heartbreaking.
From picket line to picket fence - what does it mean to be gay in the era of same-sex marriage and equal rights? More than four decades after the start of the gay liberation movement, lesbians and gay men can legally marry, adopt children, and enjoy the same rights and respect as heterosexuals ... or can they? In Straight Expectations, Julie Bindel, an out lesbian since 1977, tracks the changes in the gay community in the last forty years and asks whether fighting for the right to marry has achieved genuine progress. Drawing on extensive original research into changing attitudes towards sexuality, as well as interviews with scientists examining the 'gay gene', gay liberation pioneers, religious figures and key players of all political persuasions, Straight Expectations asks: - Is sexual orientation learned or latent? - Do lesbians and gay men have anything in common? - Have we now reached a stage where the 'only gay in the village' mentality no longer has any place in society?
Yet neither mastery nor abjection were fixed but circulated through, and were mediated by, relational networks that manifested heterogeneous relations to social norms and were conditioned by the specific socio-spatialities. Furthermore, both women told stories, rich in sensual detail, about experiences of intercorporeality that momentarily suspended these tensions. Here, abjection operated neither as repression nor lack, but established a condition for transgressive presence which could elicit communal joyfulness. These moments suspended distinctions between dependency and autonomy, self and other. Their stories about struggles with their difference in relation to social norms implicated forms of recognition associated with disruptions, inversions, and dispersals of power that elicited the play of eros. These were intercorporeal occasions of self-realisation through others, where recognition operated as a reply to the question: "Who am I?" rather than confirming identity, and making Caverero's distinction between the unique existant and social identity relevant to understanding transgressive subjectivities. This would place interpellation and recognition within a more general dialogics of subject formation, that would include the significance of dialogical peer relationship aside from authoritative others. While gender norms structure the dilemmas faced by women in trying to embody 'femininity' and 'masculinity', they are lived as a struggle with conflicting demands and desires, and are negotiated within the shifting constraints of multiple social fields and through various processes of recognition. While living female masculinity transgresses gender norms, it also makes a claim for difference made apart from them, which could be at the heart of subject formation.
An investigative journalist uncovers a hidden custom that will transform your understanding of what it means to grow up as a girl In Afghanistan, a culture ruled almost entirely by men, the birth of a son is cause for celebration and the arrival of a daughter is often mourned as misfortune. A bacha posh (literally translated from Dari as “dressed up like a boy”) is a third kind of child – a girl temporarily raised as a boy and presented as such to the outside world. Jenny Nordberg, the reporter who broke the story of this phenomenon for the New York Times, constructs a powerful and moving account of those secretly living on the other side of a deeply segregated society where women have almost no rights and little freedom. The Underground Girls of Kabul is anchored by vivid characters who bring this remarkable story to life: Azita, a female parliamentarian who sees no other choice but to turn her fourth daughter Mehran into a boy; Zahra, the tomboy teenager who struggles with puberty and refuses her parents’ attempts to turn her back into a girl; Shukria, now a married mother of three after living for twenty years as a man; and Nader, who prays with Shahed, the undercover female police officer, as they both remain in male disguise as adults. At the heart of this emotional narrative is a new perspective on the extreme sacrifices of Afghan women and girls against the violent backdrop of America’s longest war. Divided into four parts, the book follows those born as the unwanted sex in Afghanistan, but who live as the socially favored gender through childhood and puberty, only to later be forced into marriage and childbirth. The Underground Girls of Kabul charts their dramatic life cycles, while examining our own history and the parallels to subversive actions of people who live under oppression everywhere.

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