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This book emanates from a duo-colloquium which explored the Europeanisation of private law in the context of efforts to consolidate the consumer acquis, the Draft Common Frame of Reference, the appointment of an Expert Group on a Common Frame of Reference in the area of European contract law, the passage of the Consumer Rights Directive and the proposed Common European Sales Law. This book, with fully updated contributions, critically reflects on whether the process of Europeanisation, which has shaped private law in the EU Member States, has now reached a significant turning point in its development, a point of punctuated equilibrium. Written by a team of leading authors, the topics covered will be of concern in all European legal systems and beyond.
One of the most topical questions in the legal systems is whether and to what extent fundamental rights impact our rights and obligations in our contractual relations. The European Union has integrated the Charter of Fundamental Rights into the Treaties of Rome and Lisbon. This book highlights whether and to what extent fundamental rights affect the position of citizens generally and in various fields of law, such as private (contractual) law, labour law,financial services, intellectual property rights, and the judicial protection in courts.
'Does European regulatory private law offer a genuine model of justice for society? Beyond its initial libertarian focus on economic integration through the market citizen, might it now serve the social inclusion of the vulnerable? In the wake of Hans Micklitz's inspired and relentless pursuit of meaning within the ongoing constitutionalization of private law relationships, this rich collection explores the implications of new, specifically European, forms of access rights, which ensure (horizontally and vertically) enforceable and non-discriminatory opportunity for market participation.' Horatia Muir Watt, Columbia Law School, US This insightful book, with contributions from leading international scholars, examines the European model of social justice in private law that has developed over the 20th century. The first set of articles is devoted to the relationship between corrective, commutative, procedural and social justice, more particularly the role and function of commutative justice in contrast to social justice. The second section brings together scholars who discuss the relationship between constitutional order, the values enshrined in the constitutional order and the impact of constitutional values on private law relations. The third section focuses on the impact of socio-economic developments within the EU and within selected Member States on the proprietary order of the EU, on the role and function of the emerging welfare state and the judiciary, as well as on nation state specific patterns of social justice. The final section tests the hypothesis to what extent patterns of social justice are context related and differ in between labour, consumer and competition law. The Many Concepts of Social Justice in European Private Law will prove to be of great interest to academics of law, as well as to private lawyers and European policymakers.
There remains an urgent need for a deeper discussion of the theoretical, political and federal dimensions of the European codification project. While much valuable work has already been undertaken, the chapters in this volume take as their starting point the proposition that further reflection and critical thought will enhance the quality and efficacy of the on-going work of the various codification bodies. The volume contains chapters by representatives of the Common Frame of Reference, the Study Group and the Acquis Group as well as by those who have not been involved in particular projects but who have previously commented more distantly on their work - for instance those belonging to the Trento Group, and the Social Justice Group. The chapters between them represent the most comprehensive attempt so far to survey the state of the codification project, its theoretical, political and federal foundations and the future prospects for enforcement and compliance.
"This publication is a collection of papers of the second meeting of the Dornburg Research Gruop on New Administrative Law which was held in London in May 2007"--Acknowledgments.
This volume explores the relationship between constitutional and regulatory questions on the one hand, and private law on the other hand, examining how European private law has developed under the influence of regional legal traditions and the EU acquis communautaire. It focuses on themultiple actors and institutions that today contribute to legal and cultural integration within a multi-level framework, involving Member States and subnational actors together with EU Institutions. It underlines the different roles of legislators, regulators and judges in building an integratedmarket which is consistent with fundamental rights and social policies. It also highlights the principles and institutions that may preserve national legal identities in the context of European legal and political integration, striking a difficult balance between harmonization and differentiation. Within this framework the volume questions the current boundaries of European private laws and proposes a coordinated perspective which examines competition, regulation and private law alike. The book focuses in particular on competition and consumer law, and on tort and regulation. Attention isalso drawn to the strategic role to be played by private international law. It is argued that the distinction between private and public law should be redefined by acknowledging a new balance between public institutions and private parties. The collection contains several proposals for furthering the process of Europeanization of private law without losing the richness of existing western legal traditions as they have developed in previous centuries. It calls on European and national institutions to involve practitioners in devisingnew patterns of legal integration and in transforming European legal education.This book is an original contribution to the scholarly and policy debates about the desirability and modes of Europeanization of private law, in a context in which the pressures of globalization and of national identities seem to question the chosen path of integration.
The European codification project has rapidly gathered pace since the turn of the century. This monograph considers the codification project in light of a series of broader analytical frameworks Â? comparative, historical and constitutional Â? which make modern codification phenomena intelligible. This new reading across fields renders the European codification project (currently being promoted through the Common Frame of Reference and the Optional Sales Law Code proposal) vulnerable to constitutionally-grounded criticism, traceable to normative considerations of private law authority and legitimacy. Arguing that modern codification phenomena are more complex than positivist, socio-legal and historical approaches have suggested over the past two centuries, the book stages a pathbreaking method of analysis of the law-discourse (nomos-centred) which questions at once the reduction of private law to legislation and of law to power and, on this basis, redefines the ways in which to counter law's disintegration and crisis in the context of Europeanisation. Professor Niglia reconstructs the European codification project as a complex structure of government-in-the-making that embodies a set of contingent world views, excludes alternatives, challenges the plurality of private laws and entrenches conflicts that pertain not only to form (codification, de-codification, recodification) but also to dilemmas implicated in determining the substantive orientation of European private law. The book investigates the position of the codifiers and their discontents in the shadow of the codification strategy pursued by the European Commission Â? noting a new turn in the struggle over the configuration of private law which has taken place since the Savigny-Thibaut dispute of 1814 which this book critically revisits exactly two centuries later. This monograph is particularly aimed at readers interested in exploring the complexities, and interconnections, of the supposedly separate realms of comparative law, European law, private law, legal history, constitutional law, sociology of law and, last but not least, legal theory and jurisprudence.

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