Download Free The Story Of Manned Space Stations Springer Praxis Books Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Story Of Manned Space Stations Springer Praxis Books and write the review.

This book charts the history of manned space stations in a logical, chronological order. It tells the story of the two major space powers starting out on their very separate programs, but slowly coming together. It describes rarely mentioned development programs, most of which never flew, including the US Manned Orbiting Laboratory, the Soviet Almaz station, and the Soviet Polyus battlestation. The Mir space station was one of the greatest human achievements in modern history, and a thorough telling of its story is essential to this book. This book is the first of its kind to tell the whole story of the manned space stations from the USA and Russia.
Between May 1973 and February 1974 three teams of astronauts increased the American space endurance record from 14 days, set in 1965, to three months aboard the Skylab space station in missions lasting 28, 59 and 84 days. American astronauts did not surpass these records for over 20 years until the NASA Mir missions began in 1995. Skylab evolved from plans to use Apollo lunar hardware for extended scientific missions in Earth orbit, becoming a platform for research in solar science, stellar astronomy, space physics, earth resources, life and material sciences. Skylab was where Americans first learned the skill of truly living and working in space, even offering students the chance to fly their own experiments on a manned spacecraft. In Skylab - Americas Space Station, David Shayler chronicles the evolution of the station, its infrastructure on the ground including astronaut training, each of the three manned missions, summary of results, achievements and the lessons learned. The creation of the International Space Station is the real legacy of Skylab as American astronauts once again embark on extended missions around the Earth.
Creating the International Space Station' will be the first comprehensive review of the historical background, rationale behind, and events leading to the construction and commissioning of the ISS. The authors describe the orbital assembly of the ISS on a flight-by-flight basis, listing all the experiments planned in the various laboratory modules and explain their objectives. They also provide an account of the long-term stresses and strains of building the ISS on the US/Russia relationship, especially after 1997. By offering a comprehensive mix of operational work, microgravity science and future plans, the book should satisfy both the space enthusiast, eager for a detailed review of the missions, and the specialist wishing to read about the science research programme.
Peter Bond describes the development and evolution of space stations, with particular emphasis on the International Space Station, beginning with the revolution that began in 1970, when Salyut 1, the world's first space station was sent into orbit by the Soviet Union. Defeated in the race to the Moon, the Soviets redirected their efforts towards the conquest of near-Earth space. In the next three decades, their increasingly large and sophisticated structures rewrote the history books as cosmonauts continued to push back all space endurance records. Only the U.S. Skylab, a technological cul-de-sac based on surplus Apollo hardware, interrupted this era of Soviet domination. By the mid-1990's, Russian physician Valeri Poliakov had lived continuously for 14 months on board the Mir space station, long enough to travel to Mars and back. The book explains how the human exploitation of low-Earth orbit is about to change. With Mir no longer in existence, all eyes are on the next generation, the International Space Station (ISS).
This remarkable book gives a comprehensive account of the longest manned space mission of the time. It details for the first time the people involved and the crews assigned to operate the first space station Salyut. The book portrays the selection of the crews, dramatic flights and tragedy of Soyuz 11. Biographies of the Soyuz 11 cosmonauts are published for the first time in English. The book relates discussions between the key personnel, and investigates the causes of the tragedy. The book ends with memories of all those affected by the DOS program and the tragedy of Soyuz 11 and looks forward to a continuation of the historic mission of Salyut.
Rex Hall and Dave Shayler provide a unique history of the Soyuz spacecraft programme from conception, through development to its use, detailed in the only English language book available on this topic. Planned for publication in 2003, it will celebrate 40 years since the original concept of the Soyuz craft.
Brian Harvey recounts for the first time the definitive history of scientific Russian space probes and the knowledge they acquired of the Earth, its environment, the Moon, Mars and Venus. He examines what Russian Space Science has actually achieved in furthering our knowledge of the Solar System, focusing on the instrumentation and scientific objectives and outcomes, the information gained and lessons learnt. Boxes and charts are used extensively in order to convey in an easily understandable manner for the non-scientific reader the problems and issues addressed and solved by Soviet space science. The book opens with the story of early space science in Russia, which started when the first Russian rockets were fired into the high atmosphere from Kapustin Yar in the late 1940s. Instruments were carried to measure and map the atmosphere and later rockets carried dogs to test their reactions to weightlessness. In order to beat America into Earth orbit, two simpler satellites than originally planned were launched, Sputnik and Sputnik 2, which provided some initial information on atmospheric density, while the following Sputnik 3 carried twelve instruments to measure radiation belts, solar radiation, the density of the atmosphere and the Earth’s magnetic field. The author recounts how, by the 1960s, the Soviet Union had developed a program of investigation of near-Earth space using satellites within the Cosmos program, in particular the DS (Dnepropetrovsky Sputnik), small satellites developed to investigate meteoroids, radiation, the magnetic fields, the upper atmosphere, solar activity, ionosphere, charged particles, cosmic rays and geophysics. Brian Harvey then gives the scientific results from Russian lunar exploration, starting with the discovery of the solar wind by the First Cosmic Ship and the initial mapping of the lunar far side by the Automatic Interplanetary Station. He describes Luna 10, which made the first full study of the lunar environment, Luna 16 which brought soil back to Earth and the two Moon rovers which travelled 50 kms across the lunar surface taking thousands of measurements, soil analyses and photographs, as well as profiles of discrete areas. Chapters 4 and 5 describe in detail the scientific outcomes of the missions to Venus and Mars, before considering the orbiting space stations in Chapter 6. Space science formed an important part of the early manned space program, the prime focus being the human reaction to weightlessness, how long people could stay in orbit and the effects on the body, as well as radiation exposure. Chapter 7 looks at the later stage of Soviet and Russian space science, including Astron and Granat, the two observatories of the 1980s, and Bion, the space biology program which flew monkeys and other animals into orbit. The final chapter looks forward to a new period of Russian space science with the Spektr series of observatories and a range smaller science satellites under the Federal Space Plan 2006-2015.

Best Books