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This book charts the history of manned space stations in a logical, chronological order. It tells the story of the two major space powers starting out on their very separate programs, but slowly coming together. It describes rarely mentioned development programs, most of which never flew, including the US Manned Orbiting Laboratory, the Soviet Almaz station, and the Soviet Polyus battlestation. The Mir space station was one of the greatest human achievements in modern history, and a thorough telling of its story is essential to this book. This book is the first of its kind to tell the whole story of the manned space stations from the USA and Russia.
Creating the International Space Station' will be the first comprehensive review of the historical background, rationale behind, and events leading to the construction and commissioning of the ISS. The authors describe the orbital assembly of the ISS on a flight-by-flight basis, listing all the experiments planned in the various laboratory modules and explain their objectives. They also provide an account of the long-term stresses and strains of building the ISS on the US/Russia relationship, especially after 1997. By offering a comprehensive mix of operational work, microgravity science and future plans, the book should satisfy both the space enthusiast, eager for a detailed review of the missions, and the specialist wishing to read about the science research programme.
Peter Bond describes the development and evolution of space stations, with particular emphasis on the International Space Station, beginning with the revolution that began in 1970, when Salyut 1, the world's first space station was sent into orbit by the Soviet Union. Defeated in the race to the Moon, the Soviets redirected their efforts towards the conquest of near-Earth space. In the next three decades, their increasingly large and sophisticated structures rewrote the history books as cosmonauts continued to push back all space endurance records. Only the U.S. Skylab, a technological cul-de-sac based on surplus Apollo hardware, interrupted this era of Soviet domination. By the mid-1990's, Russian physician Valeri Poliakov had lived continuously for 14 months on board the Mir space station, long enough to travel to Mars and back. The book explains how the human exploitation of low-Earth orbit is about to change. With Mir no longer in existence, all eyes are on the next generation, the International Space Station (ISS).
This remarkable book gives a comprehensive account of the longest manned space mission of the time. It details for the first time the people involved and the crews assigned to operate the first space station Salyut. The book portrays the selection of the crews, dramatic flights and tragedy of Soyuz 11. Biographies of the Soyuz 11 cosmonauts are published for the first time in English. The book relates discussions between the key personnel, and investigates the causes of the tragedy. The book ends with memories of all those affected by the DOS program and the tragedy of Soyuz 11 and looks forward to a continuation of the historic mission of Salyut.
This unique book presents a historical and philatelic survey of Earth exploration from space. It covers all areas of research in which artificial satellites have contributed in designing a new image of our planet and its environment: the atmosphere and ionosphere, the magnetic field, radiation belts and the magnetosphere, weather, remote sensing, mapping of the surface, observation of the oceans and marine environments, geodesy, and the study of life and ecological systems. Stamping the Earth from Space presents the results obtained with the thousands of satellites launched by the two former superpowers, the Soviet Union and the United States, and also those of the many missions carried out by the ESA, individual European countries, Japan, China, India, and the many emerging space nations. Beautifully illustrated, it contains almost 1100 color reproductions of philatelic items. In addition to topical stamps and thematic postal documents, the book provides an extensive review of astrophilatelic items. The most important space missions are documented through event covers and cards canceled at launch sites, tracking stations, research laboratories, and mission control facilities.
Between May 1973 and February 1974 three teams of astronauts increased the American space endurance record from 14 days, set in 1965, to three months aboard the Skylab space station in missions lasting 28, 59 and 84 days. American astronauts did not surpass these records for over 20 years until the NASA Mir missions began in 1995. Skylab evolved from plans to use Apollo lunar hardware for extended scientific missions in Earth orbit, becoming a platform for research in solar science, stellar astronomy, space physics, earth resources, life and material sciences. Skylab was where Americans first learned the skill of truly living and working in space, even offering students the chance to fly their own experiments on a manned spacecraft. In Skylab - Americas Space Station, David Shayler chronicles the evolution of the station, its infrastructure on the ground including astronaut training, each of the three manned missions, summary of results, achievements and the lessons learned. The creation of the International Space Station is the real legacy of Skylab as American astronauts once again embark on extended missions around the Earth.
“Manned Spaceflight Log” discusses over 40 recent spaceflights from September 2006 through September 2012, a time of great change in human spaceflight history. Following on from “Praxis Manned Spaceflight Log 1961-2006,” the authors continue the story until the end of September 2012, with new chapters detailing the development and accomplishments of human spaceflight, expanded tables and additional photographs, many in color, throughout. The book opens with a new foreword by Colonel Alfred M. Worden, USAF Retired, NASA Astronaut and CMP of Apollo 15, which reflects on the changing history of human spaceflight and the prospects for future operations. The first chapter explains how human spaceflight has approached the different challenges of exploring space and provided the hardware to meet those challenges. This chapter also describes the various attempts to reach orbital flight and the often confusing distinction between ballistic, sub-orbital, and so-called ‘astro-flights’ of the X-15 rocket research aircraft program. Chapter 2 recalls key historic moments and missions across five decades of human spaceflight. Each decade has provided useful lessons for the next and a foundation for future achievement. The new mission entries are collected in the third section in chronological order. A review of the next steps in human spaceflight, including plans to occupy the International Space Station well into the 2020s and the growth of the Chinese manned space program including a large space station and planned base on the Moon, is discussed in Chapter 4. The tables provide a complete up-to-date overview of human spaceflight operations and experience from April 1961 to September 2012 and a selected chronology of important milestones from those years. Completing the book is a comprehensive bibliography that lists all the major Springer-Praxis human spaceflight titles and other important works that provide the reader with a resource to continue further research.

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