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This book is part true-crime novel, and part textbook. It was written specifically about surveillance, as conducted by private investigators. It's virtually an industry bible, and contains an incredible volume of highly detailed how-to techniques, for virtually every area of surveillance. It covers how to get information out of people under pretext, how to follow people on foot or by car. What to expect and even how to think as a PI, in order to get great results. The book covers everything including: Training courses and licensing Job preparation Conduct of surveillance operations Special techniques used by professionals Following on foot, car, bus, train, taxi Working in specialist areas (buildings, apartments, shopping centres etc) While an invaluable resource for any potential recruit to the PI industry, this book is also an excellent resource for experienced PI's as well. It lists a large number of web references and other details for information sources that can be used to track down elusive offenders. With almost 544 pages, this incredible encyclopaedic resource covers all the basic techniques, as well as some you have never thought of. How can a female PI urinate on a long vehicle stakeout? What web resource can be used to determine the likely gender of an obscure ethnic name which was listed in client intelligence? How do I identify someone? What role does human psychology play in surveillance operations? How can I find out if they are working? 10 pages explaining why and how things are seen, 10 issues to consider when parking a surveillance vehicle, 30 issues to consider in selecting a suitable surveillance vehicle, 9 methods to assist identification of an unknown unit number in a large block, . . .and much more Not only does this comprehensive training resource cover techniques, it is illustrated with a large number of real cases which Chris has conducted. These stories are an incredible insight to the PI world, and are both entertaining and fascinating. Each story details real-life implementation of techniques described in the book.
From Philip Marlowe and Sam Spade to Jake Gittes, private eyes have made for some of the most memorable characters in cinema. We often view these detectives as lone wolves who confront and try to make sense of a violent and chaotic modern world. Bran Nicol challenges this stereotype in The Private Eye and offers a fresh take on this iconic character and the film noir genre. Nicol traces the history of private eye movies from the influential film noirs of the 1940s to 1970s neonoir cinema, whose slow and brilliant decline gave way to the fading of detectives into movie mythology today. Analyzing a number of classic films—including The Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, Chinatown, and The Long Goodbye—he reveals that while these movies are ostensibly thrillers, they are actually occupied by issues of work and love. The private eye is not a romantic hero, Nicol argues, but a figure who investigates the concealments of others at the expense of his own private life. Combining a lucid introduction to an underexplored tradition in movie history with a new approach to the detective in film, this book casts new light on the private worlds of the private eye.
Private detectives and detective agencies played a major role in American history from 1870 to 1940. Pinkerton, Burns, Thiels, and the smaller independents were a multi-million dollar industry, hired out by many if not most American corporations, who needed services of surveillance, strike breaking, and labor espionage. Not only is John Walton's account the first sustained history of this industry, it is also the first book to trace the ways in which the private detective came to occupy a cherished place in popular imagination. Walton paints lively portraits of these mythical figures from Sherlock Holmes, the brilliant eccentric, to Sam Spade, the hard-boiled hero of Dashiell Hammett's best-selling tales. There's a great question lurking in here: how did pulp magazine editors shape the image of the hard-boiled private eye, and what sorts of interplay obtained between the actual records (agency files, memoirs) of these motley individuals in real life and the legend of the private detective in mass-market fiction? This history of the private eyes and this account of how the detective industry and the culture industry played off of each other is a first. Walton show us, in clean clear outline, the figure of the classical private eye, and he shows us further how the memory of this iconic figure was sustained in fiction, radio, film, literary societies, product promotions, adolescent entertainments, and a subculture of detective enthusiasts.
Peaches is a family pet poodle who has great powers to find things when no one else can. In Finding Foster a Home, Foster's family moved and couldn't take him along. He is put up for adoption and luckily is staying at Peaches' Doggie DayCare until a new family can be found. Peaches puts on her "private eye hat" and along with her boyfriend, Mel, takes charge of finding Foster a new home. Did they succeed? Was Foster adopted by a new family? You'll have to read the book to find out! Look for other adventures of Peaches the Private Eye Poodle, such as Finding Dipsey Doodle, Where is Loosey Goosey? and The Missing Muffin Caper. Ms. Hamilton and Peaches live in a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia. She spent most of her working career at Delta Air Lines in both New York City and Atlanta. Prior to taking early retirement in 2003, she headed up Delta Air Lines' Worldwide Sales Training Organization. Ms. Hamilton took early retirement to start her own successful corporate training company. She has been involved in writing interactive training materials for about twenty-five years and she also does keynote speaking on customer service. Ms. Hamilton has always wanted to venture into writing children's books and thought this might be the right time. When taking Peaches for walks, children are always running up to her because Peaches is so cute (said by a biased parent), so Ms. Hamilton thought she would put the two together and Peaches The Private Eye Poodle was born. Publisher's website: http://www.strategicpublishinggroup.com/title/ PeachesThePrivateEyePoodle-FindingFosterAHome.html
This volume focuses on the popular genre of the private eye novel. As with the previous volumes, this work contains lists of pseudonyms, characters and their creators, periods and locations of stories, and, covers 100 classic novels of the genre.
"Politics and the Private Eye" uses Sara Paretsky's 2003 detective novel, Blacklist, to launch an investigation of how ideology and aesthetics converge to make the hardboiled detective story a uniquely adaptable popular form, one especially ripe for reflecting and confronting contemporary issues. The study begins by examining the roots of the hardboiled form, assessing how and why early masters shaped and used the genre, thereby laying the groundwork for authors to come. It closes with an analysis of how several current writers have responded, via the hardboiled detective story, to the cultural and political developments spurred by September 11th and its aftermath.
Some people are convinced that Private Eye Thanet Blake is a social pariah. Others believe having contact with him insures them of having a short life. A few are convinced he works for the cityês mortuaries and drives a hearse. When Captain Holt of the Police Department informs Blake that PIês are being offed by an unknown person, he asks Blake for help. –We donêt have a single clue as to who is doing the offing. We need your help to do some nosing around for us, come up with clues that will lead us to the perp. Iêll even put you on the payroll.” That starts another murder mystery for Thanet Blake, the shamus who hates murder cases because too many of his friends end up dead, or forever hurt. Who will he lose this time?