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This book is part true-crime novel, and part textbook. It was written specifically about surveillance, as conducted by private investigators. It's virtually an industry bible, and contains an incredible volume of highly detailed how-to techniques, for virtually every area of surveillance. It covers how to get information out of people under pretext, how to follow people on foot or by car. What to expect and even how to think as a PI, in order to get great results. The book covers everything including: Training courses and licensing Job preparation Conduct of surveillance operations Special techniques used by professionals Following on foot, car, bus, train, taxi Working in specialist areas (buildings, apartments, shopping centres etc) While an invaluable resource for any potential recruit to the PI industry, this book is also an excellent resource for experienced PI's as well. It lists a large number of web references and other details for information sources that can be used to track down elusive offenders. With almost 544 pages, this incredible encyclopaedic resource covers all the basic techniques, as well as some you have never thought of. How can a female PI urinate on a long vehicle stakeout? What web resource can be used to determine the likely gender of an obscure ethnic name which was listed in client intelligence? How do I identify someone? What role does human psychology play in surveillance operations? How can I find out if they are working? 10 pages explaining why and how things are seen, 10 issues to consider when parking a surveillance vehicle, 30 issues to consider in selecting a suitable surveillance vehicle, 9 methods to assist identification of an unknown unit number in a large block, . . .and much more Not only does this comprehensive training resource cover techniques, it is illustrated with a large number of real cases which Chris has conducted. These stories are an incredible insight to the PI world, and are both entertaining and fascinating. Each story details real-life implementation of techniques described in the book.
Private detectives and detective agencies played a major role in American history from 1870 to 1940. Pinkerton, Burns, Thiels, and the smaller independents were a multi-million dollar industry, hired out by many if not most American corporations, who needed services of surveillance, strike breaking, and labor espionage. Not only is John Walton's account the first sustained history of this industry, it is also the first book to trace the ways in which the private detective came to occupy a cherished place in popular imagination. Walton paints lively portraits of these mythical figures from Sherlock Holmes, the brilliant eccentric, to Sam Spade, the hard-boiled hero of Dashiell Hammett's best-selling tales. There's a great question lurking in here: how did pulp magazine editors shape the image of the hard-boiled private eye, and what sorts of interplay obtained between the actual records (agency files, memoirs) of these motley individuals in real life and the legend of the private detective in mass-market fiction? This history of the private eyes and this account of how the detective industry and the culture industry played off of each other is a first. Walton show us, in clean clear outline, the figure of the classical private eye, and he shows us further how the memory of this iconic figure was sustained in fiction, radio, film, literary societies, product promotions, adolescent entertainments, and a subculture of detective enthusiasts.
Features a classic story by Jayne Ann Krentz, in which P.I. Josh January will go above and beyond to protect, and seduce, Maggie Gladstone, and two original stories by Dani Sinclair and Julie Miller. Original.
In The Private Eye we learn about snow geese through the eyes of Native people, scientists, artists, hunters, and farmers. Yup'ik Eskimo Charles Hunt harvests snow geese along the Yukon River delta each fall, continuing a subsistence way of life that has existed for millennia. Russian, Canadian, and US scientists track the movements of the geese each spring and fall, banding, sexing, counting, and precisely monitoring the activities of these beautiful birds. Robert Bateman provides an artist's view of nature and relates how his curiosity led him to join a camp set up at a remote nesting site. Mary Burns also talks to hunters, joining a party of them as they wait for their snow geese decoys to lure the real thing into a Westham Island field in the Fraser delta. To complete the experience she prepares snow geese for supper. As well, Burns travels around the Skagit River delta during a population survey and meets a dairy farmer who describes both the wild flocks that converge on his fields each spring and the snow geese he raises in pens. The Private Eye suggests that by acknowledging our many and varied connections with the natural world, we will have a better understanding of the human place in it.
Some people are convinced that Private Eye Thanet Blake is a social pariah. Others believe having contact with him insures them of having a short life. A few are convinced he works for the cityês mortuaries and drives a hearse. When Captain Holt of the Police Department informs Blake that PIês are being offed by an unknown person, he asks Blake for help. –We donêt have a single clue as to who is doing the offing. We need your help to do some nosing around for us, come up with clues that will lead us to the perp. Iêll even put you on the payroll.” That starts another murder mystery for Thanet Blake, the shamus who hates murder cases because too many of his friends end up dead, or forever hurt. Who will he lose this time?
"Peaches' best friend Maggie, asks Peaches to help her find her favorite toy, Loosey Goosey"--P. [4] of cover.

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