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This edited collection offers analyses of ‘global citizenship education’ within and across different national contexts. This book illustrates the contingency of definitions, the complexities of juxtaposing demands and priorities in different educational contexts, and the difficulties and tensions of asking a question that is arguably one of the most pressing of our time: how should we live together in interdependent ecologies in a finite planet? In the discipline of education, where market imperatives and the dictatorship of 'effective replicable results' have laid siege to independent debates, this book aims to emphasize the importance of raising our intellectual game as educators to interrupt new and old problematic patterns of engagements, representations, uncomplicated solutions and conceptual straightjackets. Contributors to this volume address the tensions between homogenizing universalisms and parochial specifisms, ethnocentrisms and relativisms, deficit theorizations and romanticizations of difference, fantasies of supremacy and paralyses in guilt, the 'global' and the 'local'. The chapters take different approaches to map the origins, meanings, workings, ethics, politics and implications of initiatives, approaches, and conceptual frameworks related to the ideas of globalization, citizenship and education in different sites of knowledge production. This book was originally published as a special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education.
This book looks at the emergence of internationally linked Japanese nongovernmental advocacy networks that have grown rapidly since the 1990s in the context of three conjunctural forces: neoliberalism, militarism, and nationalism. It connects three disparate literatures—on the global justice movement, on Japanese civil society, and on global citizenship education. Through the narratives of fifty activists in eight overlapping issue areas—global governance, labor, food sovereignty, peace, HIV/AIDS, gender, minority and human rights, and youth—Another Japan is Possible examines the genesis of these new social movements; their critiques of neoliberalism, militarism, and nationalism; their local, regional, and global connections; their relationships with the Japanese government; and their role in constructing a new identity of the Japanese as global citizens. Its purpose is to highlight the interactions between the global and the local—that is, how international human rights and global governance issues resonate within Japan and how, in turn, local alternatives are articulated by Japanese advocacy groups—and to analyze citizenship from a postnational and postmodern perspective.
This book examines faculty and students at four universities around the world to understand the diverse ways individuals experience and define citizenship in the age of globalization.
As the world seemingly gets smaller and smaller, schools around the globe are focusing their attention on expanding the consciousness and competencies of their students to prepare them for the conditions of globalization. Global citizenship education is rapidly growing in popularity because it captures the longings of so many—to help make a world of prosperity, universal benevolence, and human rights in the midst of globalization’s varied processes of change. This book offers an empirical account from the perspective of teachers and classrooms, based on a qualitative study of ten secondary schools in the United States and Asia that explicitly focus on making global citizens. Global citizenship in these schools has two main elements, both global competencies (economic skills) and global consciousness (ethical orientations) that proponents hope will bring global prosperity and peace. However, many of the moral assumptions of global citizenship education are more complex and contradict these goals, and are just as likely to have the unintended consequence of reinforcing a more particular Western individualism. While not arguing against global citizenship education per se, the book argues that in its current forms it has significant limits that proponents have not yet acknowledged, which may very well undermine it in the long run.
This book investigates the parallels between mainstream development discourse and colonial discourse as theorized in the work of Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak and Edward Said. Aiming to repoliticize post-colonial theory by applying its understandings to contemporary political discourses, author April Biccum critically examines the ways in which development in its current form has recently begun to be promoted among the metropolitan public. Biccum contends that what has begun is a sustained marketing campaign for development that is a repetition, augmentation and ultimately much greater success of the work of the Empire Marketing Board of 1926. Demonstrating how this marketing campaign for development attempts to facilitate support for neo-liberal globalization, Biccum contends that this theatre of legitimation is emerging in response to growing critical voices and counter-hegemonic activity on the international stage. Featuring in depth analyses of the UK, cultural values, DfID, the commemoration of the slave trade and campaigns including Live8 and Make Poverty History, this book will be of interest to students and scholars of postcolonial studies, development studies, and international political economy. It will also offer insights valuable to a wider range of subjects including critical theory and globalization studies.
The number of schools that call themselves international is growing exponentially. In addition many other schools are exploring the concept of international-mindedness and what that might mean in the contemporary world of globalisation. This book sets out to provide a critical perspective on current issues facing ‘international schooling’, particularly the conflict between ‘internationalising’ and ‘globalising’ tendencies and to explore these as they affect teaching and learning, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment as well as to explore the contribution international schools might make to the achievement of global citizenship. It is the first book to critically analyse the ambiguities, tensions and conflicts that face those involved with and researching, international schools and their role in global networking. Issues addressed include: the political economy of international schools (Hugh Lauder and Ceri Brown) their relations to global and local cultures, global markets and civil society (Richard Bates) the role of international schools in global networking (Michael Wylie) the micropolitics of such schools (Richard Caffyn) the growth complexity and challenges facing the International Baccalaureate (Tristan Bunnell) the future demands for and of teachers in international schools (Mary Hayden and Jeff Thompson) the nature of teaching and learning in international schools (Helen Fail) the problematic idea of an international curriculum (Jim Cambridge) issues facing international assessment (Richard Bates) the challenge of education for global citizenship (Harriet Marshall). This provocative book will be essential reading for those teaching in, leading and governing international schools in countries around the world, as well as those who contemplating entering the rapidly expanding world of international schooling.
An acknowledged challenge for humanitarian democratic education is its perceived lack of philosophical and theoretical foundation, often resulting in peripheral academic status and reduced prestige. A rich philosophical and theoretical tradition does however exist. This book synthesises crucial concepts from Critical Realism, Critical Social Theory, Critical Discourse Studies, neuro-, psycho-, socio- and cognitive-linguistic research, to provide critical global educators with a Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) framework for self- and negotiated evaluation. Empirical research spanning six years, involving over 500 international teachers, teacher educators, NGO and DEC administrators and academics, traces the personal and professional development of the critical global educator. Analyses of surveys, focus groups and interviews reveal factors which determine development, translating personal transformative learning to professional transaction and transformational political efficacy. Eight recommendations call for urgent conceptual deconstruction, expansion and redefinition, mainstreaming Global Citizenship Education as Sustainable Development. In an increasingly heteroglossic world, this book argues for relevance, for Critical Discourse Studies, if educators mediating and modelling diverse emergent disciplines are to honestly and effectively engage a learner’s consciousness. The Critical Global Educator will appeal to researchers, academics and postgraduate students in the fields of citizenship, development, global education, sustainability, social justice, human rights and professional development.

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