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This edited collection offers analyses of ‘global citizenship education’ within and across different national contexts. This book illustrates the contingency of definitions, the complexities of juxtaposing demands and priorities in different educational contexts, and the difficulties and tensions of asking a question that is arguably one of the most pressing of our time: how should we live together in interdependent ecologies in a finite planet? In the discipline of education, where market imperatives and the dictatorship of 'effective replicable results' have laid siege to independent debates, this book aims to emphasize the importance of raising our intellectual game as educators to interrupt new and old problematic patterns of engagements, representations, uncomplicated solutions and conceptual straightjackets. Contributors to this volume address the tensions between homogenizing universalisms and parochial specifisms, ethnocentrisms and relativisms, deficit theorizations and romanticizations of difference, fantasies of supremacy and paralyses in guilt, the 'global' and the 'local'. The chapters take different approaches to map the origins, meanings, workings, ethics, politics and implications of initiatives, approaches, and conceptual frameworks related to the ideas of globalization, citizenship and education in different sites of knowledge production. This book was originally published as a special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education.
As the world seemingly gets smaller and smaller, schools around the globe are focusing their attention on expanding the consciousness and competencies of their students to prepare them for the conditions of globalization. Global citizenship education is rapidly growing in popularity because it captures the longings of so many—to help make a world of prosperity, universal benevolence, and human rights in the midst of globalization’s varied processes of change. This book offers an empirical account from the perspective of teachers and classrooms, based on a qualitative study of ten secondary schools in the United States and Asia that explicitly focus on making global citizens. Global citizenship in these schools has two main elements, both global competencies (economic skills) and global consciousness (ethical orientations) that proponents hope will bring global prosperity and peace. However, many of the moral assumptions of global citizenship education are more complex and contradict these goals, and are just as likely to have the unintended consequence of reinforcing a more particular Western individualism. While not arguing against global citizenship education per se, the book argues that in its current forms it has significant limits that proponents have not yet acknowledged, which may very well undermine it in the long run.
The success of individual nation states today is often measured in terms of their ability to benefit from and contribute to a host of global economic, political, socio-cultural, technological, and educational networks. This increased multifaceted international inter-dependence represents an intuitively contradictory and an immensely complex situation. This scenario requires that national governments, whose primary responsibility is towards their citizenry, must relinquish a degree of control over state borders to constantly developing trans and multinational regimes and institutions. Once state borders become permeable all sorts of issues related to rights earned or accrued due to membership of a national community come into question. Given that neither individuals nor states can eschew the influence of the growing interdependence, this new milieu is often described in terms of shrinking of the world into a global village. This reshaping of the world requires us to broaden our horizons and re-evaluate the manner in which we theorize human personhood within communal boundaries. It also demands us to acknowledge that the relative decline of Euro-American economic and political influence and the rise of Asian and Latin American states at the global level have created spaces in which a de-territorialized and a de-historicized notion of citizenship and state can now be explored. The essays in this volume represent diverse disciplinary, analytical, and methodological approaches to understand what the implications are of being a citizen of both a nation state and the world simultaneously. In sum, Deconstructing Global Citizenship explores the question of whether a synthesis of contradictory national and global tendencies in the term “global citizenship” is even possible, or if we are better served by fundamentally reconsidering our ideas of “citizenship,” “community,” and “politics.”
The number of schools that call themselves international is growing exponentially. In addition many other schools are exploring the concept of international-mindedness and what that might mean in the contemporary world of globalisation. This book sets out to provide a critical perspective on current issues facing ‘international schooling’, particularly the conflict between ‘internationalising’ and ‘globalising’ tendencies and to explore these as they affect teaching and learning, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment as well as to explore the contribution international schools might make to the achievement of global citizenship. It is the first book to critically analyse the ambiguities, tensions and conflicts that face those involved with and researching, international schools and their role in global networking. Issues addressed include: the political economy of international schools (Hugh Lauder and Ceri Brown) their relations to global and local cultures, global markets and civil society (Richard Bates) the role of international schools in global networking (Michael Wylie) the micropolitics of such schools (Richard Caffyn) the growth complexity and challenges facing the International Baccalaureate (Tristan Bunnell) the future demands for and of teachers in international schools (Mary Hayden and Jeff Thompson) the nature of teaching and learning in international schools (Helen Fail) the problematic idea of an international curriculum (Jim Cambridge) issues facing international assessment (Richard Bates) the challenge of education for global citizenship (Harriet Marshall). This provocative book will be essential reading for those teaching in, leading and governing international schools in countries around the world, as well as those who contemplating entering the rapidly expanding world of international schooling.
This Handbook is a much needed international reference work, written by leading writers in the field of global citizenship and education. It is based on the most recent research and practice from across the world, with the 'Geographically-Based Overviews' section providing summaries of global citizenship and education provided for Southern Africa, Australasia, Europe, the Middle East, North America, Latin America, and East and South East Asia. The Handbook discusses, in the 'Key Ideologies' section, the philosophies that influence the meaning of global citizenship and education, including neo-liberalism and global capitalism; nationalism and internationalism; and issues of post-colonialism, indigeneity, and transnationalism. Next, the 'Key Concepts' section explores the ideas that underpin debates about global citizenship and education, with particular attention paid to issues of justice, equity, diversity, identity, and sustainable development. With these key concepts in place, the 'Principal Perspectives and Contexts' section turns to exploring global citizenship and education from a wide variety of viewpoints, including economic, political, cultural, moral, environmental, spiritual and religious, as well as taking into consideration issues of ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and social class. Finally, the 'Key Issues in the Teaching of Global Citizenship' section discusses how education can be provided through school subjects and study abroad programmes, as well as through other means including social media and online assessment, and political activism. This Handbook will be vital reading for academics, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates in the fields of sociology and education, particularly those with an interest in comparative studies.
This book investigates the parallels between mainstream development discourse and colonial discourse as theorized in the work of Homi Bhabha, Gayatri Spivak and Edward Said. Aiming to repoliticize post-colonial theory by applying its understandings to contemporary political discourses, author April Biccum critically examines the ways in which development in its current form has recently begun to be promoted among the metropolitan public. Biccum contends that what has begun is a sustained marketing campaign for development that is a repetition, augmentation and ultimately much greater success of the work of the Empire Marketing Board of 1926. Demonstrating how this marketing campaign for development attempts to facilitate support for neo-liberal globalization, Biccum contends that this theatre of legitimation is emerging in response to growing critical voices and counter-hegemonic activity on the international stage. Featuring in depth analyses of the UK, cultural values, DfID, the commemoration of the slave trade and campaigns including Live8 and Make Poverty History, this book will be of interest to students and scholars of postcolonial studies, development studies, and international political economy. It will also offer insights valuable to a wider range of subjects including critical theory and globalization studies.

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