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Drawing on concepts in political economy, political ecology, justice theory, and critical development studies, the authors offer the first comprehensive, systematic exploration of the ways in which adaptation projects can produce unintended, undesirable results.
Adaptation policies and measures are essential components of any global attempt to cope with the pending impacts of climate change. Drawing on concepts in political economy, political ecology, justice theory, and critical development studies, this book offers the first comprehensive, systematic exploration of the ways in which adaptation projects can produce unintended, undesirable results. The authors present a political economy framework revolving around four key processes: enclosure, exclusion, encroachment, and entrenchment. They document the presence of these four inequitable attributes in adaptation projects across four case studies: the displacement of char communities in Bangladesh; the Dutch Delta Works in the Netherlands; Hurricane Katrina reconstruction efforts in the United States; and the politics of technology transfer and knowledge inequality within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.
This book provides the first systematic critique of the concept of climate change adaptation within the field of international development. Drawing on a reworked political ecology framework, it argues that climate is not something ‘out there’ that we adapt to. Instead, it is part of the social and biophysical forces through which our lived environments are actively yet unevenly produced. From this original foundation, the book challenges us to rethink the concepts of climate change, vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity in transformed ways. With case studies drawn from Pakistan, India and Mongolia, it demonstrates concretely how climatic change emerges as a dynamic force in the ongoing transformation of contested rural landscapes. In crafting this synthesis, the book recalibrates the frameworks we use to envisage climatic change in the context of contemporary debates over development, livelihoods and poverty. With its unique theoretical contribution and case study material, this book will appeal to researchers and students in environmental studies, sociology, geography, politics and development studies.
Anthropogenic climate change poses a grave threat to societies around the world. The greenhouse gases that generate climate change are produced by virtually every sector of every economy. The predominant response of governments around the world is to mitigate climate change through the capping and trading of emissions. This book explores the establishment of emissions trading as a form of environmental, market-based governance in the United States, Europe, Australia, South Korea, Japan, and China. The book conceptualizes markets as institutions, and analyzes them as a system of climate governance. To this end, it argues that international efforts to promulgate markets run up against local cultures of markets that shape economic practices and knowledge to different degrees. While the global agenda under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has sought to develop similar systems to enable interconnected and synchronized emissions reductions, each of the cases analyzed here has produced different results. The markets and climate policies established reflect the syncretic impact of socio-political and cultural context on the institutional transfer of markets. Each country expresses a varying degree of ease or unease with the establishment of markets as systems of climate governance. Exploration of market adaptation adds new insights to theories of varieties of capitalism. The book also examines the material implications of emissions markets on the environment and climatic systems. In sum, the study finds that cultures of markets present a substantial challenge to a universalist prescription for resolving climate change and highlights issues at the interface of political and economic governance in different political economies. This includes issues of citizen, state, and industry participation, and the materiality of economic and financial productivity.
"Climate change differs from any other problem that, as collective humanity, we face today. If it goes unchecked, the consequences are likely to be catastrophic for human life on earth. Yet for most people, and for many policy-makers too, it tends to be a 'back of the mind' issue. ... [This book] argues controversially, we do not have a systematic politics of climate change. Politics-as-usual won't allow us to deal with the problems we face, while the recipes of the main challenger to orthodox politics, the green movement, are flawed at source." - cover.
Climate change threatens the economy of the United States through increased flooding and storm damage, climate-driven changes in crop yields, disruptions in labor productivity, crime, and public health and heat-related strains on energy systems. Combining current data with state-of-the-art climate models, econometric research on human responses to climate, and cutting-edge private sector risk assessment tools, this prospectus crafts a game-changing analysis of the risks of future climate change in specific U.S. regions and sectors. This work is based on a critically acclaimed independent assessment of climate changeÕs economic risks commissioned by the Risky Business Project. With contributions from Karen Fisher-Vanden (Penn State University), Michael Greenstone (MIT), Geoffrey Heal (Columbia Business School), Michael Oppenheimer (Princeton University), and Nicholas Stern and Bob Ward (Grantham Research Institute), as well as a foreword from the nationÕs leading voices on environmental action, the prospectus speaks to scientists, researchers, scholars, activists, and policymakers. It depicts the distribution of escalating climate change risk across the country and anticipates its effects on aspects as varied as coastal property and crime. Beautifully illustrated and accessibly written, Economic Risks of Climate Change is an essential tool for helping businesses and governments prepare for the future.
The risks of climate change are potentially immense. The benefits of taking action are also clear: we can see that economic development, reduced emissions, and creative adaptation go hand in hand. A committed and strong low-carbon transition could trigger a new wave of economic and technological transformation and investment, a new era of global and sustainable prosperity. Why, then, are we waiting? In this book, Nicholas Stern explains why, notwithstanding the great attractions of a new path, it has been so difficult to tackle climate change effectively. He makes a compelling case for climate action now and sets out the forms that action should take.Stern argues that the risks and costs of climate change are worse than estimated in the landmark Stern Review in 2006 -- and far worse than implied by standard economic models. He reminds us that we have a choice. We can rely on past technologies, methods, and institutions -- or we can embrace change, innovation, and international collaboration. The first might bring us some short-term growth but would lead eventually to chaos, conflict, and destruction. The second could bring about better lives for all and growth that is sustainable over the long term, and help win the battle against worldwide poverty. The science warns of the dangers of neglect; the economics and technology show what we can do and the great benefits that will follow; an examination of the ethics points strongly to a moral imperative for action. Why are we waiting?

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