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This work presents a comprehensive theory of dreaming based on many years of psychological and biological research by Ernest Hartmann and others.
Many contemporary neuroscientists are skeptical about the belief that dreaming accomplishes anything in the context of human adaptation and this skepticism is widely accepted in the popular press. This book provides answers to that skepticism from experimental and clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and anthropologists. Ranging across the human and life sciences, the authors provide provocative insights into the enduring question of dreaming from the point of view of the brain, the individual, and culture. The Functions of Dreaming contains both new theory and research on the functions of dreaming as well as revisions of older theories dating back to the founder of modern dream psychology, Sigmund Freud. Also explored are the many roles dreaming plays in adaptation to daily living, in human development, and in the context of different cultures: search, integration, identity formation, memory consolidation, the creation of new knowledge, and social communication.
Sleep and dreaming are manifestations in higher organisms of a fundamental 'circadian rhythm' of inactivity-activity. During the past thirty years, research has provided a great deal of new information about the phenomenom and phenomenology of sleep, and the relationship between sleep and wakefulness. This book aims to describe, organise and interpret some of this new knowledge in order to stimulate a greater appreciation of the role of sleep and dreaming in human adaptation. The study of sleep and dreaming provides a very special perspective on human functioning. It stands in direct contrast to more traditional paradigms utilised in psychology that place the locus of explanation of human behaviour in the 'external environment'
Many contemporary neuroscientists are skeptical about the belief that dreaming accomplishes anything in the context of human adaptation and this skepticism is widely accepted in the popular press. This book provides answers to that skepticism from experimental and clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, and anthropologists. Ranging across the human and life sciences, the authors provide provocative insights into the enduring question of dreaming from the point of view of the brain, the individual, and culture. The Functions of Dreaming contains both new theory and research on the functions of dreaming as well as revisions of older theories dating back to the founder of modern dream psychology, Sigmund Freud. Also explored are the many roles dreaming plays in adaptation to daily living, in human development, and in the context of different cultures: search, integration, identity formation, memory consolidation, the creation of new knowledge, and social communication.
An updated edition of Moorcroft’s 2003 volume, this new work reflects recent scientific advances in the area of sleep and disorders. As in the previous book, Understanding Sleep and Dreaming, this new edition serves as a compact overview for now sleep experts, covering physiological sleep mechanisms, brain function, psychological ramifications of sleep, dimensions of dreaming, and clinical disorders associated with sleep. It is accessibly written with specially boxed material that enhances the text. It also offers a good foundation for those who will continue sleep studies, while at the same time offering enough information for those who will apply this knowledge in other ways such as clinicians private practices or researchers. It is an excellent text for courses on sleep at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The section on sleep labs will show how computers have replaced former models of data collection and storage; includes the new area of the genetics of sleep; add a new box on teen sleep; insert a new box on the emerging information about how technology use affects sleep; emphasize the controversy over rampart, wide-spread sleep deprivation; and include a new box covering the connection between sleep loss and weight gain. Additional inclusions might incorporate current “hot topics,” such as the effect of shift work on sleep, sleep problems in adolescents, and nightmare treatment for people suffering from PTSD.
This fascinating reference covers the major topics concerning dreaming and sleep, based on the latest empirical evidence from sleep research as well as drawn from a broad range of dream-related interdisciplinary contexts, including history and anthropology. * 330 alphabetically arranged entries * An appendix provides resources for further reading, including online sources * A special index on dreams * Primary resources lists afer each entry for reference and review
Leading sleep researcher Rosalind Cartwright brings together decades of work on sleep, dreaming and sleep disorders to propose a new theory of how the mind works continuously. Drawing on her own research and that of others, Cartwright describes how conscious and unconscious thoughts and feelings move forward--from waking, into sleep and dreaming, to the next waking day. One main purpose of sleep is to regulate disturbing emotions .Not everyone does this successfully every night. Her research on dreams of those suffering depression show these fail to regulate mood overnight, and when sleepwalkers behave aggressively they have not had enough time dreaming. With many case examples, the author illustrates how conscious and unconscious thoughts and feelings are being linked to older memories throughout sleep and dreams, and how this process effects changes in thinking and feeling the next day--even reshaping our identities. The Twenty-four Hour Mind offers a unique integration of psychology and sleep research that will be of interest to anyone captivated by the mysteries of the mind--and what sleep and dreams teach us about ourselves.

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