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We are currently witnessing an unprecedented transformation in the legal profession and legal education. The Legal Services Act 2007 and the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 have both enabled and necessitated dramatic structural changes to the profession, as well as impacting on its ethos and ethicality. The recent Legal Education and Training Review (LETR) promises similarly dramatic change to the provision of legal education, reflecting the shifting landscape of both the legal professional market and Higher Education in general. These transformative changes bring both exciting opportunities and challenges with which everyone involved in the law – from University lecturers, to Senior Partners in leading law firms, to the judiciary – must grapple. This edited collection comprises a selection of papers presented at the 2nd conference of CEPLER, Birmingham Law School's Centre for Professional Legal Education and Research. The aim of the Conference, and thus this collection, was to bring together leading academic scholars, senior figures from professional practice, policy-makers, and representatives of the regulatory authorities, to reflect on the key issues arising from this transformative moment. As such, this volume of essays covers diverse ground, from curriculum development to professional theory, enriched and enhanced by the range of backgrounds and perspectives of its contributors.
This book predicts the decline of today's professions and describes the people and systems that will replace them. In an Internet society, according to Richard Susskind and Daniel Susskind, we will neither need nor want doctors, teachers, accountants, architects, the clergy, consultants, lawyers, and many others, to work as they did in the 20th century. The Future of the Professions explains how 'increasingly capable systems' - from telepresence to artificial intelligence - will bring fundamental change in the way that the 'practical expertise' of specialists is made available in society. The authors challenge the 'grand bargain' - the arrangement that grants various monopolies to today's professionals. They argue that our current professions are antiquated, opaque and no longer affordable, and that the expertise of the best is enjoyed only by a few. In their place, they propose six new models for producing and distributing expertise in society. The book raises important practical and moral questions. In an era when machines can out-perform human beings at most tasks, what are the prospects for employment, who should own and control online expertise, and what tasks should be reserved exclusively for people? Based on the authors' in-depth research of more than ten professions, and illustrated by numerous examples from each, this is the first book to assess and question the relevance of the professions in the 21st century.
This edition makes Susskind's highly-acclaimed and best-selling book available in paperback, and includes a new and substantial preface by the author. His book demonstrates why the future of the law is digital. It shows why and how IT is radically altering and will alter further the practice of law and the administration of justice. Beyond automating and streamlining traditional ways of providing legal advice, IT is re-engineering the entire legal process, resulting in legal products and information services focused on dispute pre-emption rather than dispute resolution, and legal risk management rather than legal problem solving. With easy and inexpensive access available, IT will help to integrate the law with business and domestic life. This book explores the implications, opportunities, and challenges presented by the information society as it irrevocably changes how law will be practised and justice administered. In this paperback edition, the author provides a substantial new preface which develops many of his central themes and takes account of likely developments in technology. The message for lawyers remains a stark one: in order to guarantee a stake in the legal system of the future, lawyers must adapt their working practices or die. The message for everyone else is an empowering one: they can now demand radically improved legal services, and if lawyers cannot provide this, many others will. From the reviews of the hardback: `A work of considerable scholarship and significance ... The Future of Law maps out a way forward in uncertain, but exciting, times. This ought to beand in due course will becompulsory reading for civil servants in the Lord Chancellors Department. This is not simply a book for computer enthusiasts. The general reader will gain particular benefit from this book. As just such a one, but with aspirations to be otherwise, I benefited enormously.' The ObserverR `The book's style is welcoming and describesa convincing scenario which law firms must address or discount if they wish to survive the onset of the virtual community. This work is strongly recommended to all persons involved, however tangential, in the provision of legal services and for those who seek to make use of them.' New Law Journal `There are 40 pages of practical advice for solicitors practices of all sizes offering gravy-soaked chunks of prime consultancy that are worth the price of the book. You should read this book ifyou are at all interested in the development of legal practice to enable you to make sufficiently informed decisions for securing the future you would wish for your practice.' Law Society Gazette
Maharg presents a critical inquiry into the identity and possibilities of legal education, and an exploration of transformational alternatives to our current theories and practices of teaching and learning the law. This book analyses and challenges curren
This detailed portrait of American lawyers traces their efforts to professionalize during the last 100 years by erecting barriers to control the quality and quantity of entrants. Abel describes the rise and fall of restrictive practices that dampened competition among lawyers and with outsiders. He shows how lawyers simultaneously sought to increase access to justice while stimulating demand for services, and their efforts to regulate themselves while forestalling external control. Data on income and status illuminate the success of these efforts. Charting the dramatic transformation of the profession over the last two decades, Abel documents the growing number and importance of lawyers employed outside private practice (in business and government, as judges and teachers) and the displacement of corporate clients they serve. Noting the complexity of matching ever more diverse entrants with more stratified roles, he depicts the mechanism that law schools and employers have created to allocate graduates to jobs and socialize them within their new environments. Abel concludes with critical reflections on possible and desirable futures for the legal profession.
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