Download Free The Film Experience Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Film Experience and write the review.

In our culture, watching movies is a universal experience but understanding film may not be. The Film Experience reaches out to students, connecting their experiences watching movies with better understanding and knowledge of the medium's full scope. Timothy Corrigan and Patricia Whites classroom favorite is both authoritative and joyful about watching, analyzing, and understanding film. With clips from classic and contemporary films (Rear Window, Life of Pi, Moonrise Kingdom, Chinatown, and many others) plus hundreds of movie images and other graphics, the thoroughly revised new edition covers everything from editing to cinematography to narrative genres, all in a cultural context that reinforces why films and film study matter. The book's featuresForm in Action, Film in Focus, and Concepts at Work combine text, stills, and links to videos online to explore specific films, scenes, and trends in depth.
The Film Experience is a comprehensive introduction to film that recognizes students as movie fans while surpassing all other texts in helping them understand the art form’s full scope. Noted scholars and teachers Tim Corrigan and Patricia White capture the complete film experience, situating their strong coverage of the medium’s formal elements within the larger cultural contexts that inform the ways we all watch film—from economics and exhibition to marketing and the star system. A host of learning tools gives students the support they need to make the transition from movie fan to critical viewer. Now with a sharper focus that highlights the essential formal and cultural concepts of cinema, and a powerful new suite of video and media, The Film Experience is the consummate introductory film text. Read the preface.
The Film Experience is the only text to combine a serious, comprehensive approach to the study of film with a practical and engaging style. This dynamic text discusses form and technique within historical and cultural contexts and makes the connection between how film techniques work and how they shape a film's many possible meanings.The Film Experience meets students where they are as avid movie fans and then moves them toward becoming critical viewers and writers.
Cinema is a sensuous object, but in our presence it becomes also a sensing, sensual, sense-making subject. Thus argues Vivian Sobchack as she challenges basic assumptions of current film theory that reduce film to an object of vision and the spectator to a victim of a deterministic cinematic apparatus. Maintaining that these premises ignore the material and cultural-historical situations of both the spectator and the film, the author makes the radical proposal that the cinematic experience depends on two "viewers" viewing: the spectator and the film, each existing as both subject and object of vision. Drawing on existential and semiotic phenomenology, and particularly on the work of Merleau-Ponty, Sobchack shows how the film experience provides empirical insight into the reversible, dialectical, and signifying nature of that embodied vision we each live daily as both "mine" and "another's." In this attempt to account for cinematic intelligibility and signification, the author explores the possibility of human choice and expressive freedom within the bounds of history and culture.
In our culture, watching movies is a universal experience – but understanding film may not be. The Film Experience reaches out to students, connecting their experiences watching movies with better understanding and knowledge of the medium's full scope. And with its game-changing new video program in LaunchPad Solo (see below), this thoroughly updated new edition makes it easier than ever to link each student’s personal viewing to a greater overall understanding of film. Timothy Corrigan and Patricia White’s classroom favorite is both authoritative and joyful about watching, analyzing, and understanding film. With clips from classic and contemporary films (Rear Window, Life of Pi, Moonrise Kingdom, Chinatown, and many others) plus hundreds of movie images and other graphics, the thoroughly revised new edition covers everything from editing to cinematography to narrative genres, all in a cultural context that reinforces why films and film study matter. The book's features—Form in Action, Film in Focus, and Concepts at Work —combine text, stills, and links to videos online to explore specific films, scenes, and trends in depth.
You see them on the video shelves, with titles such as Shadow Tracker, Psycho Girls, and The Blair Witch Project. Skeptically, perhaps, you rent one and slip it into the VCR. Hey, you think, this isn't so bad--sometimes actually quite good. Suddenly, you discover that there is a whole range of movies from filmmakers operating outside the studio system that have their own attractions that the big budget fare can't match. You have, of course, discovered the world of independent filmmaking. A fascinating group of independent film directors and producers, in interviews with the author, discuss their work and the state of the independent film industry at the end of the 20th century. Joe Bagnardi, Dennis Devine, Andrew Harrison, Jeff Leroy, Andrew Parkinson, Brett Piper, and 23 others cover such topics as the increased interest in independent films and how they are changing thanks to high-tech advances. These filmmakers vary widely in age, experience, formats and budgets--and choice of subject matter--but they all have a great passion for their work.

Best Books