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This book is intended for junior and senior undergraduate students, and master level students in human resources, risk management and insurance, industrial relations or public policy. The subject of the book is non-wage benefits paid to workers. Hence, it excludes discussion of needs-based programs such as welfare, food stamps, Supplementary Security Income, and Medicaid. It includes benefits mandated by the government including the major social insurance programs: workers' compensation, unemployment insurance and Social Security benefits. It also includes those benefits voluntarily provided by firms including: group medical care, disability benefits, paid sick time, pension benefits, life insurance, and assorted other fringe benefits. The book is divided into three parts. Part I (chapters 1 through 6) briefly introduces these programs and discusses some of the insurance and economic concepts that are useful in both evaluating the current programs, and in understanding what changes might mean for future costs and benefits. The next two parts of the book deal respectively with social insurance programs (Part II, chapters 7-10), and other employer provided benefits (Part III, chapters 11-16). Throughout, private sector human resource practice and public sector human resource policy is linked to various "ben~fit" models: the human capital model, the passive participant model, the insurance' model, the managed care model, and the integrated health benefits model.
Topics covered include public pensions in the OECD, social security, the state of private pensions, prospects for National Health Insurance in the United States, medicare, contingent workers : health and pension security, benefits for same-sex partners.
Fringe Benefits is the first in-depth study of the employee benefits system of a major industrial organization. Working with Inland Steel, a major steel plant in the Chicago area, Root read through company documents, insurance claims and grievance forms, and labour union records, supplementing them with a range of interviews with employers, employees, labour officials, and others. He discovered how the benefits package developed, how it operates -- or fails to operate -- as a form of social insurance for Inland's workers, how it is linked to the public welfare system and how it affects company operations, labour disputes and manpower planning. 'Lawrence Root's Fringe Benefits is a fascinating and insightful case study of th
Since World War II, Social Security and employer-based pension plans have become the foundations of an economic security that enables older Americans to retire with dignity and financial independence. Social insurance and tax advantaged retirement benefits currently face a number of challenges, however. The upcoming retirement of the baby boomers will swell the ranks of the retired, which are estimated to double by 2020, straining the Social Security and Medicare programs. Employers are struggling to keep their pension funds afloat, while fewer and fewer companies are offering traditional pension plans. Americans are living longer than ever before, which means they draw benefits longer, taxing the system. In Search of Retirement Security considers these challenges and provides fresh perspectives on the changing responsibilities of individuals, employers, and government in ensuring the continued dignity and independence of retirees.Contributors include Robert Frank (Cornell University), Teresa Ghilarducci (University of Notre Dame), Catherine Hill (American Association of University Women), John H. Langbein (Yale Law School), Maya C. MacGuineas (New America Foundation), Jerry L. Mashaw (Yale Law School), William Niskanen (Cato Institute), Van Doorn Ooms (Committee for Economic Development), John L. Palmer (Syracuse University), Joseph Quinn (Boston College), Virginia Reno (National Academy of Social Insurance), Annika Sundén (Swedish National Social Insurance Board), and Lawrence H. Thompson (Urban Institute).
In this new conference volume from the National Academy of Social Insurance, experts offer differing views on what changes will, and must, occur to ensure the continuing viability of Social Security, retirement benefits, unemployment insurance, Medicare, and health security programs. The book opens with a general overview of how economic and political forces will shape the future of social insurance. In the chapters that follow, contributors discuss and debate a full range of related topics, including future Social Security investment returns, the changing face of private retirement plans, insuring longevity risk in pensions and Social Security, issues in unemployment insurance, long-term financing, governance, and markets for Medicare, and health care for the underserved and uninsured. Contributors include William C. Dudley (Goldman Sachs), Richard Berner (Morgan Stanley Dean Witter), Kilolo Kijakazi (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities), Fay Lomax Cook (Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University), Lawrence Jacobs (University of Minnesota), Jack VanDerhei (Fox School of Business Management, Temple University) Craig Copeland (Employee Benefit Research Institute), Jeffery R. Brown (John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard), Janet Norwood (1993-96 Advisory Council on Unemployment Compensation), Marilyn Moon (Urban Institute), Sheila Burke (Smithsonian Institution and Kennedy School of Government, Harvard), Mark Schlesinger (Yale), Gerard Anderson (Johns Hopkins University), Lauren LeRoy (Grantmakers in Health), Ruth Riedel (Alliance Healthcare Foundation of San Diego), and Henrie M. Treadwell (W. K. Kellog Foundation¡¯s Community Voices).
This collection examines the evolution of the philosophy and practice of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations (IR) over the twentieth century. By combining history, contemporary practice, and future trends, these well-known experts present both scholarly and practitioner perspectives. Drawing on in-depth interviews and surveys with HRM executives at leading corporations, the contributors explore key trends and issues facing global companies in such areas as equal opportunity, compensation practices, and expatriation programs. The book also takes an in-depth look at one particular player in the story - Industrial Relations Counselors, Inc., the first non-profit research and consulting organization dedicated to improved HRM/IR practices - which was founded by John D. Rockefeller in 1926, and has played a central role in the development of key labor legislation including the Social Security Act.

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