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This book is intended for junior and senior undergraduate students, and master level students in human resources, risk management and insurance, industrial relations or public policy. The subject of the book is non-wage benefits paid to workers. Hence, it excludes discussion of needs-based programs such as welfare, food stamps, Supplementary Security Income, and Medicaid. It includes benefits mandated by the government including the major social insurance programs: workers' compensation, unemployment insurance and Social Security benefits. It also includes those benefits voluntarily provided by firms including: group medical care, disability benefits, paid sick time, pension benefits, life insurance, and assorted other fringe benefits. The book is divided into three parts. Part I (chapters 1 through 6) briefly introduces these programs and discusses some of the insurance and economic concepts that are useful in both evaluating the current programs, and in understanding what changes might mean for future costs and benefits. The next two parts of the book deal respectively with social insurance programs (Part II, chapters 7-10), and other employer provided benefits (Part III, chapters 11-16). Throughout, private sector human resource practice and public sector human resource policy is linked to various "ben~fit" models: the human capital model, the passive participant model, the insurance' model, the managed care model, and the integrated health benefits model.
Topics covered include public pensions in the OECD, social security, the state of private pensions, prospects for National Health Insurance in the United States, medicare, contingent workers : health and pension security, benefits for same-sex partners.
Fringe Benefits is the first in-depth study of the employee benefits system of a major industrial organization. Working with Inland Steel, a major steel plant in the Chicago area, Root read through company documents, insurance claims and grievance forms, and labour union records, supplementing them with a range of interviews with employers, employees, labour officials, and others. He discovered how the benefits package developed, how it operates -- or fails to operate -- as a form of social insurance for Inland's workers, how it is linked to the public welfare system and how it affects company operations, labour disputes and manpower planning. 'Lawrence Root's Fringe Benefits is a fascinating and insightful case study of the private, social benefit system in a major heavy manufacturing company.' -- Social Casework: The Journal of Contemporary Social Work, February 1983 '...Lawrence Root has written an excellent book, rich in information and relevant to many issues of immediate concern...The professional -- industrial social worker or policy planner -- would do well to read Fringe Benefits in order to be better equipped to understand and take advantage of such an opportunity.' -- Social Science Review, Autumn 1983 'For the serious student of benefits, its scope and its depth still make it highly rewarding reading.' -- Industrial and Labor Relations Review, April 1984
This examination of the 120-year-old American system of privatized social insurance reveals that the system fails to provide adequate retirement income security, its most prominent goal, and, in fact, its greatest influence is in supplying funds to U.S. capital markets.
In this new conference volume from the National Academy of Social Insurance, experts offer differing views on what changes will, and must, occur to ensure the continuing viability of Social Security, retirement benefits, unemployment insurance, Medicare, and health security programs. The book opens with a general overview of how economic and political forces will shape the future of social insurance. In the chapters that follow, contributors discuss and debate a full range of related topics, including future Social Security investment returns, the changing face of private retirement plans, insuring longevity risk in pensions and Social Security, issues in unemployment insurance, long-term financing, governance, and markets for Medicare, and health care for the underserved and uninsured. Contributors include William C. Dudley (Goldman Sachs), Richard Berner (Morgan Stanley Dean Witter), Kilolo Kijakazi (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities), Fay Lomax Cook (Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University), Lawrence Jacobs (University of Minnesota), Jack VanDerhei (Fox School of Business Management, Temple University) Craig Copeland (Employee Benefit Research Institute), Jeffery R. Brown (John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard), Janet Norwood (1993-96 Advisory Council on Unemployment Compensation), Marilyn Moon (Urban Institute), Sheila Burke (Smithsonian Institution and Kennedy School of Government, Harvard), Mark Schlesinger (Yale), Gerard Anderson (Johns Hopkins University), Lauren LeRoy (Grantmakers in Health), Ruth Riedel (Alliance Healthcare Foundation of San Diego), and Henrie M. Treadwell (W. K. Kellog Foundation¡¯s Community Voices).

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