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Covering all the major areas of television production, this in-depth work highlights the widely varying influences, difficulties and opportunities at work in the industry. Each kind of producer across the seven areas here examined faces the same practical issues of budget, talent and equipment resources, and end-product expectations; however, the self-image of the producers and the creative environment in which they work can differ greatly from one programming sector to the next, and whilst their careers may run parallel they are usually cut off from one another ideologically. Based on interviews from over two hundred and fifty producers working across a selection of British television channels as well as producers of a number of high-profile American shows, this book takes in a panoramic view of production models at work today and concludes with some insightful suggestions for the future.
"The International Encyclopedia of Digital Communication and Society" offers critical assessments of theoretical and applied research on digitally-mediated communication, a central area of study in the 21st century. - Examines topics with unprecedented breadth and depth, with the aim of bringing together international and interdisciplinary perspectives - Organized in an accessible A-Z format with over 150 entries on key topics ranging from 2,000 to 10,000 words - Addresses a full range of topics including digitally-mediated social media, commercial applications and online gaming, to law and policy analysis and information and communication technologies for development - Published with a regularly updated online edition which will ensure readers are kept abreast of the latest developments in research- Part of "The Wiley Blackwell-ICA International Encyclopedias of Communication" series, published in conjunction with the "International Communication Association"
Is television a cultural wasteland, or a medium that has brought people more great art, music, dance, and drama than any previous media? How do we study and interpret television? What are the effects of television on individuals and society, and how do we measure them? What is the role of television in our political and economic life? Television in Society explores these issues in considering how television both reflects and affects society. The book is divided into two sections. The first focuses on programming and deals with commercials, ceremonial events, important series (such as "MASH" and "Lou Grant"), significant programs (a production of Brave New World on television), and the images of police on the medium. The second part of the book deals with important issues and topics related to the medium: the impact of television violence, values found on television, the impact of television on education, the significance of new technological developments, and the always thorny issue of freedom of the press. The articles are drawn together by a brilliant introductory essay by Arthur Asa Berger, who examines television as culture.
Anthropological interest in mass communication and media has exploded in the last two decades, engaging and challenging the work on the media in mass communications, cultural studies, sociology and other disciplines. This is the first book to offer a systematic overview of the themes, topics and methodologies in the emerging dialogue between anthropologists studying mass communication and media analysts turning to ethnography and cultural analysis. Drawing on dozens of semiotic, ethnographic and cross-cultural studies of mass media, it offers new insights into the analysis of media texts, offers models for the ethnographic study of media production and consumption, and suggests approaches for understanding media in the modern world system. Placing the anthropological study of mass media into historical and interdisciplinary perspectives, this book examines how work in cultural studies, sociology, mass communication and other disciplines has helped shape the re-emerging interest in media by anthropologists. A former Washington D.C. journalist,Mark Allan Petersonis currently Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. He has published numerous articles on American, South Asian and Middle Eastern media, and has taught courses on anthropological approaches to media t at he American University in Cairo, the University of Hamburg, and Georgetown University.
In the fifties British cinema won large audiences with popular war films and comedies, creating stars such as Dirk Bogarde and Kay Kendall, and introducing the stereotypes of war hero, boffin and comic bureaucrat which still help to define images of British national identity. In British Cinema in the Fifties, Christine Geraghty examines some of the most popular films of this period, exploring the ways in which they approached contemporary social issues such as national identity, the end of empire, new gender roles and the care of children. Through a series of case studies on films as diverse as It Always Rains on Sunday and Genevieve, Simba and The Wrong Arm of the Law, Geraghty explores some of the key debates about British cinema and film theory, contesting current emphases on contradiction, subversion and excess and exploring the curious mix of rebellion and conformity which marked British cinema in the post-war era.
This highly topical book exposes the tensions between state policies of broadcasting regulation and practices of civil society in the Asian region which is struggling with its incorporation into a new globalised, electronic information and entertainment world. Kitley critically compares Western principles of broadcasting, civil society and cultural regulation with alternative 'Asian' practices of regulation and organisation. Over the past forty years Asian states have used television as a normative cultural force in nation building, but more recently many states have deregulated their television sectors and introduced national commercial and international satellite services. As Asian states wrestle with a perceived loss of cultural control and identity through deregulation, this book considers their viewpoints and the question of whether the television public sphere offers space for the representation of popular sovereignty, and transversal concerns about human rights, press freedom, gender, environmental and world trade issues.
Except for accounts of journalists, dissident employees, and an occasional congressional committee focusing on crime and unethical practices, we have known very little about how television programs are produced. The Hollywood TV Producer, originally published in 1971, was the first serious examination of constraints, conflicts, and rewards in the daily lives of television producers. Its insights were important at the time and have not been challenged. Using as her framework the social system of mass communications, Muriel G. Cantor shows how producers select stories for television series and how movies end up in prime time. In order to get a comprehensive look at the inner workings of the TV industry and its producers, the author interviewed eighty producers in Hollywood over a two-season period. She probed to discover how the people producers work for and where they work influences their decision-making. As Cantor shows, critics of television who suggest that to remain in production, a producer must first please the business organization that finances his or her operations, are largely correct. Cantor shows that content is determined by a combination of artistic and professional factors, as well as social, economic, and political norms that have developed over time in the industry.

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