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This book provides concrete suggestions for adjunct professors about how to design and conduct all aspects of teaching law students, based on the enormous body of research on teaching and learning to legal education. New and experienced adjuncts can apply the book's principles from sequencing a course to grading an exam. Updated and revised chapters provide a legal education-focused overview of the research on teaching and learning, students' perspective on law teaching and learning, course design, class design, student motivation, teaching methods, assessment, and professional development as teachers. New chapters focus on experiential learning, lasting learning, and troubleshooting.
Designed for law teachers who want to improve their teaching and students' learning, this book offers general teaching principles and dozens of concrete ideas. The first two chapters present foundational principles of learning and instruction as well as insights from students. The next 12 chapters address classroom dynamics, technology, questioning, discussion, collaborative learning, experiential learning, feedback, assessment, and continued development for teachers. Each of these 12 chapters introduces the topic based on educational research and then offers classroom-tested exercises, approaches, material, and methods contributed by veteran teachers. The co-authors/editors, Gerald Hess (Gonzaga), Steven Friedland (Elon), Michael Hunter Schwartz (Washburn), and Sophie Sparrow (New Hampshire) are experts in legal education pedagogy. Techniques for Teaching Law 2 retains the format of the first volume, but introduces new content and new ideas that instructors of any level and background will find useful.
The Teaching of Criminal Law provides the first considered discussion of the pedagogy that should inform the teaching of criminal law. It originates from a survey of criminal law courses in different parts of the English-speaking world which showed significant similarity across countries and over time. It also showed that many aspects of substantive law are neglected. This prompted the question of whether any real consideration had been given to criminal law course design. This book seeks to provide a critical mass of thought on how to secure an understanding of substantive criminal law, by examining the course content that best illustrates the thought process of a criminal lawyer, by presenting innovative approaches for securing active learning by students, and by demonstrating how criminal law can secure other worthwhile graduate attributes by introducing wider contexts. This edited collection brings together contributions from academic teachers of criminal law from Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and Ireland who have considered issues of course design and often implemented them. Together, they examine several innovative approaches to the teaching of criminal law that have been adopted in a number of law schools around the world, both in teaching methodology and substantive content. The authors offer numerous suggestions for the design of a criminal law course that will ensure students gain useful insights into criminal law and its role in society. This book helps fill the gap in research into criminal law pedagogy and demonstrates that there are alternative ways of delivering this core part of the law degree. As such, this book will be of key interest to researchers, academics and lecturers in the fields of criminal law, pedagogy and teaching methods.
Legal research is a fundamental skill for all law students and attorneys. Regardless of practice area or work venue, knowledge of the sources and processes of legal research underpins the legal professional’s work. Academic law librarians, as research experts, are uniquely qualified to teach legal research. Whether participating in the mandatory, first-year law school curriculum or offering advanced or specialized legal research instruction, law librarians have the up-to-date knowledge, the broad view of the field, and the expertise to provide the best legal research instruction possible. This collection offers both theoretical and practical guidance on legal research education from the perspectives of the law librarian. Containing well-reasoned, analytical articles on the topic, the volume explains and supports the law librarian’s role in legal research instruction. The contributors to this book, all experts in teaching legal research, challenge academic law librarians to seize their instructional role in the legal academy. This book was based on a special issue of Legal Reference Services Quarterly.
In this groundbreaking book, Adrian Bejan takes the recurring patterns in nature—trees, tributaries, air passages, neural networks, and lightning bolts—and reveals how a single principle of physics, the Constructal Law, accounts for the evolution of these and all other designs in our world. Everything—from biological life to inanimate systems—generates shape and structure and evolves in a sequence of ever-improving designs in order to facilitate flow. River basins, cardiovascular systems, and bolts of lightning are very efficient flow systems to move a current—of water, blood, or electricity. Likewise, the more complex architecture of animals evolve to cover greater distance per unit of useful energy, or increase their flow across the land. Such designs also appear in human organizations, like the hierarchical "flowcharts" or reporting structures in corporations and political bodies. All are governed by the same principle, known as the Constructal Law, and configure and reconfigure themselves over time to flow more efficiently. Written in an easy style that achieves clarity without sacrificing complexity, Design in Nature is a paradigm-shifting book that will fundamentally transform our understanding of the world around us.
The land now called Concord was originally inhabited by the Abenaki people and the Penacook tribe. Concord’s first settlers, such as Ebenezer Eastman, began laying out the Plantation of Penacook, as it was known in 1725, along the fertile fields of the Merrimack River. It was incorporated in 1734 as Rumford and then renamed to Concord by Gov. Benning Wentworth in 1765. Concord experienced a surge in transportation and manufacturing in the 19th century, producing the Concord Coaches, Prescott Pianos, and steam boilers. As Concord celebrates its 250th anniversary, the city flourishes as the state capital and has a thriving community of restaurants, entertainment, and culture for all to enjoy. It retains its town sensibility as it plans for the continued growth of the local economy. Today’s civic leaders, like Byron Champlin and James Carroll, work conjointly with business leaders, such as Tom Arnold of Arnie’s and Juliana Eades of the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund, to build and enhance Concord’s cultural, social, and economic identity.
This book gives principals the tools they need to avoid lawsuits by teaching their staff the information they need to practice preventive law.

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