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The book defines the broad parameters of social change for Native Nations in the 21st century, as well as their prospects for cultural continuity. It will be an excellent resource for use in sociology, ethnic studies or Native American studies classes. Champagne teaches with his collection for a course that usually has 100-140 students each term. Many of the themes Champagne tackles are of general interest in the study of social change, from governmental, economic, religious, and environmental perspectives. Issues of cultural continuity are central to Native American studies programs, and the book would be valuable for use in introductory courses in Native American studies, but is designed for graduate students and undergraduates, especially in Indian studies.
Includes two versions of the Oneida creation story in the Oneida language with parallel English translation, Oneida to English lexicons, and two early versions of the creation story in English.
Since Evo Morales was elected president in 2006 as leader of the MAS - the first social movement to achieve political power in Latin America - Bolivia has seen radical changes and continues to generate huge interest worldwide. Crabtree and Chaplain show how ordinary people have responded to the process of change that has taken place in the country over the last few years. Based on a wealth of interview material and original reportage, the book enters the terrain of grass-roots politics, identifying how Bolivians work within the country's social movements and how they view the effects that this participation has achieved. It asks how they see their lives as being altered - for better or for worse - by this experience, as well as how they evaluate the experience of becoming politically involved, often for the first time. This unique bottom-up analysis explores the often complex relationship between Bolivia's people, social movements and the state, highlighting both the achievements and limitations of the MAS administration. In doing so, it casts important new light both on the nature of the Bolivian "experiment" and its implications for participatory politics in other parts of the developing world.
First Nations peoples believe the eagle flies with a female wing and a male wing, showing the importance of balance between the feminine and the masculine in all aspects of individual and community experiences. Centuries of colonization, however, have devalued the traditional roles of First Nations women, causing a great gender imbalance that limits the abilities of men, women, and their communities in achieving self-actualization.Restoring the Balance brings to light the work First Nations women have performed, and continue to perform, in cultural continuity and community development. It illustrates the challenges and successes they have had in the areas of law, politics, education, community healing, language, and art, while suggesting significant options for sustained improvement of individual, family, and community well-being. Written by fifteen Aboriginal scholars, activists, and community leaders, Restoring the Balance combines life histories and biographical accounts with historical and critical analyses grounded in traditional thought and approaches. It is a powerful and important book.
Colonialism may have significantly changed the history of North America, but its impact on Native Americans has been greatly misunderstood. In this book, Neal Ferris offers alternative explanations of colonial encounters that emphasize continuity as well as change affecting Native behaviors. He examines how communities from three aboriginal nations in what is now southwestern Ontario negotiated the changes that accompanied the arrival of Europeans and maintained a cultural continuity with their pasts that has been too often overlooked in conventional Òmaster narrativeÓ histories of contact. In reconsidering Native adaptation and resistance to colonial British rule, Ferris reviews five centuries of interaction that are usually read as a single event viewed through the lens of historical bias. He first examines patterns of traditional lifeway continuity among the Ojibwa, demonstrating their ability to maintain seasonal mobility up to the mid-nineteenth century and their adaptive response to its loss. He then looks at the experience of refugee Delawares, who settled among the Ojibwa as a missionary-sponsored community yet managed to maintain an identity distinct from missionary influences. And he shows how the archaeological history of the Six Nations Iroquois reflected patterns of negotiating emergent colonialism when they returned to the region in the 1780s, exploring how families managed tradition and the contemporary colonial world to develop innovative ways of revising and maintaining identity. The Archaeology of Native-Lived Colonialism convincingly utilizes historical archaeology to link the Native experience of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the deeper history of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century interactions and with pre-European times. It shows how these Native communities succeeded in retaining cohesiveness through centuries of foreign influence and material innovations by maintaining ancient, adaptive social processes that both incorporated European ideas and reinforced historically understood notions of self and community.
Discusses the alarming reduction in the speaking of the Navajo language on the reservation, mapping out some of the intricacies of relations between the English and Navajo languages and the teaching of them, explaining why and how Navajos are having difficulty maintaining their native language, and making suggestions as to what can be done about this.
In the American imagination, the word Appalachia designates more than a geographical region. It evokes fiddle tunes, patchwork quilts, split-rail fences, and all the other artifacts that decorate a cherished romantic region of the American mind. Da

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