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The study of social capital is one of the most exciting recent developments in the social sciences. It has rapidly become a powerful concept in the vocabulary of the social sciences, influenced new research programmes in politics, economics, and the social sciences in general, and established itself in public discourse. As the idea of social capital has spread, the literature about it has increased exponentially. After twenty years it is time for a more consideredand critical assessment of its meaning and its standing as a key concept of social research. The Handbook offers a comprehensive view of social capital studies. Written by some of the main experts in the fields, who have been asked to take a fresh look at various aspects of the concept and of theempirical literatures, it is both an authoritative, critical, and innovative introduction to the study of social capital.
This book examines the social aspects of healthy ageing for older individuals. It features more than 15 papers that explore the relevance of the social environment for health on the micro, meso, and macro level. Overall, the book applies a comprehensive contextual approach that includes discussion of how family and friends, neighborhoods, nations, and welfare regimes influence health. The book first explores the issue on the individual level. It looks at the importance of social capital for health among older people, examines types of social networks and health among older Americans, as well as discusses dynamic social capital and mental health in late life. Next, the book looks at the issue through a neighborhood and societal context, which takes into account day-to-day interaction in the immediate environment as well as the social, health, and economic policies in place in different regions in the world, including America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. From there, the book goes on to offer implications and recommendations for research and practice, including the management of related concepts of research on well-being and health. It also offers a psychosocial approach to promoting social capital and mental health among older adults. This book provides health professionals as well as researchers and students in gerontology, sociology, social policy, psychology, and social work with vital insights into the social factors that increase healthy life years and promote well-being.
The term ‘social capital’ is a way of defining the intangible resources of community, shared values and trust upon which we draw in daily life. It has achieved considerable international currency across the social sciences through the very different work of Pierre Bourdieu in France and James Coleman and Robert Putnam in the United States, and has been widely taken up within politics and sociology as an explanation for the decline in social cohesion and community values in western societies. It has also been adopted by policy makers, particularly in international governmental bodies such as the World Bank. This fully revised third edition of Social Capital provides a thorough overview of the intense and fast-moving debate surrounding this subject. New material encompasses: Social capital and the internet Social capital and the economists Changing policy understandings of social capital Social capital and resilience in tough times This clear and comprehensive introduction explains the theoretical underpinning of the subject, the empirical work that has been done to explore its operation, and the influence that it has had on public policy and practice. It includes guides to further reading and a list of the most important websites.
This book examines the social aspects of healthy ageing for older individuals. It features more than 15 papers that explore the relevance of the social environment for health on the micro, meso, and macro level. Overall, the book applies a comprehensive contextual approach that includes discussion of how family and friends, neighborhoods, nations, and welfare regimes influence health. The book first explores the issue on the individual level. It looks at the importance of social capital for health among older people, examines types of social networks and health among older Americans, as well as discusses dynamic social capital and mental health in late life. Next, the book looks at the issue through a neighborhood and societal context, which takes into account day-to-day interaction in the immediate environment as well as the social, health, and economic policies in place in different regions in the world, including America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. From there, the book goes on to offer implications and recommendations for research and practice, including the management of related concepts of research on well-being and health. It also offers a psychosocial approach to promoting social capital and mental health among older adults. This book provides health professionals as well as researchers and students in gerontology, sociology, social policy, psychology, and social work with vital insights into the social factors that increase healthy life years and promote well-being.
Increasingly, resilience is being incorporated into planning and social protection policy. People have been facing shocks, both natural and anthropogenic, forever, devising and innovating a variety of institutional responses to cope with, recover from, and prevent future impacts. Central to these shocks and this coping capacity, but often underexplored, is the role of social capital. This paper, using the case studies of iddirs (funeral societies) in Ethiopia and migrant networks in the Philippines, explores the contribution of local forms of social capital to building and strengthening the resilience of individuals and communities, focusing on their contributions to coping, adaptive, and transformative capacities. This paper argues that understanding clearly the role that existing social capital can play in building resilience is a necessary first step for policymakers. The authors suggest policy interventions to fill gaps where and when necessary while supporting and deepening existing social capital.
Over the last decade, social capital has become a central concern for governments and policy makers. Despite being ill-defined and difficult to measure, numerous claims have been made about its benefits. Using a network-based approach, this book establishes a new framework for social capital and public policy. It demonstrates how a social capital framework can help us understand the public policy process, and how public policy interventions can build social capital. It offers empirical case studies of influence, innovation, partnerships and knowledge to illustrate how this framework can be applied and concludes with insights on new directions for policy. This is an invaluable text for researchers, policy-makers and students who are interested in how social capital theories can be integrated into grassroots policymaking both in Australia and overseas.

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