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For the Victorians, electricity was the science of spectacle and of wonder. It provided them with new ways of probing the nature of reality and understanding themselves. Luigi Galvani's discovery of 'animal electricity' at the end of the eighteenth century opened up a whole new world of possibilities, in which electricity could cure sickness, restore sexual potency and even raise the dead. In Shocking Bodies, Iwan Rhys Morus explores how the Victorians thought about electricity, and how they tried to use its intimate and corporeal force to answer fundamental questions about life and death. Some even believed that electricity was life, which brought into question the existence of the soul, and of God, and provided arguments in favour of political radicalism. This is the story of how electricity emerged as a powerful new tool for making sense of our bodies and the world around us.
The portrait of a female serial killer, the first woman executed in Florida in more than a century, tells of how Judias Buenoano, owner of a chain of nail salons in Pensacola, killed her husbands, lovers, and disabled first-born son for profit. Reprint.
This book reveals what you always wanted to know about the issues of life, death and the afterlife. Supported by Scriptures, it reveals shocking truths about heaven, hell and your birthright blessing. There're four components to God’s birthright (covenant) blessing which are His (1) word blessing, (2) peace blessing, (3) wealth blessing, and (4) eternal life blessing. God set this inheritance aside for you before you were born. There's enough abundance in your birthright blessing to fulfill every need you have. It entitles you to dwell in a land of utopia whereby your peace, health, friendships, quality of life, holiness and well being are absolutely perfect. Speaking of the good life, it doesn't get any better than this. This book shows that (1) you have a personal calling on your life (you’re created for a purpose), and (2) your racial group has a calling to fulfill. You need to know your personal and racial callings, for they are eternal. Before you can appreciate what God has in store for you, you need to know who you are (the real you that God created you to be). This book reveals the real you. This book also confirms the reality and location of heaven and the materials saints’ new bodies will be made of. It shows what saints do in Paradise now and forevermore. You'll be delighted and pleasantly surprised to know your heavenly activities. This book reveals (1) where Hades is located (the temporary abode of sinners called the region of disembodied spirits), (2) where the permanent place of torment is located called the eternal lake of fire, and (3) the cursed materials sinners’ bodies will consist of. In hell, sinners' bodies will burn to ashes and be recycled to burn all over again. God's Scriptures confirm these truths.
Chaucer's Body follows the fortunes of individual bodies in the Canterbury Tales to their surprising, often shocking, involvements in both the humor and the horror of being human. Neither wholly carnal nor wholly spiritual, bodies in Chaucer's poem emerge as sites of resistance to economic, political, social, and sexual forces. R. Allen Shoaf, one of America's foremost medievalists, focuses on the imagery of circulation in the Canterbury Tales, a ubiquitous trope that he cites as an index to Chaucer's sense of what it means to live in a mortal body. In particular, Shoaf argues, imagery of disease and contamination, as well as of intercourse, social and sexual alike, insists that the body's vulnerability is a necessary complement to its creativity. With a remarkably rich interplay between his main text and the notes, Shoaf examines not only what happens to physiological entities in the Tales as they circulate in nature and society but also how and why it happens. In lively and sometimes personal prose, Shoaf also offers new insights into Chaucer's language--especially his skill in the rhetoric of metonymy--that affirm the poet's status as one of the greatest English poets. When Chaucer's language transcends the limits of what currently are assumed to be its historical constraints, Shoaf writes, we find a poet who is as playfully serious with words as Shakespeare. This culmination of thirty years of reading, teaching, and writing about Chaucer will find an interested audience among all medievalists.
The Female Body in Mind introduces new ways of thinking about issues of women's mental health assessment and treatment. Its multidisciplinary approach incorporates social, psychological, biological and philosophical perspectives on the female body. The contributions, from notable academics in the field of women's mental health, examine the relationship between women's bodies, society and culture, demonstrating how the body has become a platform for women's expression of their distress and anguish. The book is divided into six sections, all centred on the theme of the body, covering: The body at risk. The hurting body. The reproductive body. The interactive body. Body-sensitive therapies. The body on my mind. All professionals involved in women's mental health will welcome this exploration of the complexities involved in the relationship between women bodies and their mental health.
A first-year medical student describes an anatomy class during which she studied the donated body of a cadaver dubbed "Eve," an experience that profoundly influenced her subsequent studies and understanding of the human form.
The notion of citizenship is complex; it can be at once an identity; a set of rights, privileges, and responsibilities; an elevated and exclusionary status, a relationship between individual and state, and more. In recent decades citizenship has attracted interdisciplinary attention, particularly with the transnational growth of Western capitalism. Yet citizenship's relationship to gender has gone relatively unexplored--despite the globally pervasive denial of citizenship to women, historically and in many places, ongoing today. This highly interdisciplinary volume explores the political and cultural dimensions of citizenship and their relevance to women and gender. Containing essays by a well-known group of scholars, including Iris Marion Young, Alison Jaggar, Martha Nussbaum, and Sandra Bartky, this book examines the conceptual issues and strategies at play in the feminist quest to give women full citizenship status. The contributors take a fresh look at the issues, going beyond conventional critiques, and examine problems in the political and social arrangements, practices, and conditions that diminish women's citizenship in various parts of the world.

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