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Traditional Chinese medicine commonly prescribes herbal formulas for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Shengmai San, a famous Chinese medicinal formula that has been used for more than eight hundred years in China, is comprised of Radix Ginseng, Fructus Schisandre and Radix Ophiopogonis. Traditionally, Shengmai San is used for the treatment of excessive loss of essence Qi and body fluid that threaten heart failure, particularly in the summer when heat exhaustion and profuse sweating commonly occur. This book provides a comprehensive treatise on the historical, phytochemical, pharmacological/toxicological, clinical as well as pharmaceutical aspects of Shengmai San and its component herbs.
Responding to the increased popularity of herbal medicines and other forms of complementary or alternative medicine in countries around the world, this reference reviews and evaluates various safety, toxicity, and quality-control issues related to the use of traditional and herbal products for health maintenance and disease prevention and treatment. With over 3,550 current references, the book highlights the role of herbal medicine in national health care while providing case studies of widely used herbal remedies and their effects on human health and wellness and the need for the design and performance of methodologically sound clinical trials for the plethora of herbal medicines.
The increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus world-wide is an issue of major socio-economic concern. Scientific interest in plant-derived medicine is steadily rising, yet there is often a wide disparity in the caliber of information available. A detailed compilation of scientific information from across the globe, Traditional Medicines for Modern Times: Antidiabetic Plants highlights the potential role of dietary and medicinal plant materials in the prevention, treatment, and control of diabetes and its complications. The book not only describes plants traditionally used to treat diabetes, but evaluates the scientific studies on these plants and describes in vitro, in vivo, and clinical methods for their investigation. It examines the theory that changes in dietary patterns from traditional plant foodstuffs containing beneficial components, to richer, more processed "junk" food is responsible for the increased prevalence of diabetes worldwide. The book begins with an introduction to the disease diabetes mellitus written by a consultant physician and an up-to-date, detailed summary table and discussion of scientifically screened antidiabetic plants compiled by authors from the Jodrell Laboratories, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK. The next chapters provide an outline of clinical, in vivo, and in vitro methods for assessing antidiabetic activity of plant materials, followed by descriptions of traditional plant remedies used in Asia, the Americas, Africa, Europe, and Australia written by an international group of authors active in antidiabetic plant research. The final chapters emphasize the role of particular phytochemical groups in the treatment or prevention of diabetes. By documenting both traditional and scientifically derived knowledge, Traditional Medicines for Modern Times: Antidiabetic Plants brings us closer to the translation of traditional knowledge into new methods for treatment of this important disease.
The use of honey can be traced back to the Stone Age. Evidence can be found for its nutritional and medicinal use beginning with prehistoric and ancient civilizations. Currently, there is a resurgence of scientific interest in natural medicinal products, such as honey, by researchers, the medical community, and even the general public. Honey in Traditional and Modern Medicine provides a detailed compendium on the medical uses of honey, presenting its enormous potential and its limitations. The book covers honey’s ethnomedicinal uses, chemical composition, and physical properties. It discusses the healing properties of honey, including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. It also examines the botanical origin of honey, a critical factor in relation to its medicinal use, along with the complex subject of the varying composition of honey. Honey’s antibacterial qualities and other attributes are described in a chapter dedicated to Leptospermum, or Manuka honey, a unique honey with potential for novel therapeutic applications. Chapters explore a variety of medicinal uses for honey, including its healing properties and use in burn and wound management. They review honey’s beneficial effects on medical conditions, such as gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular diseases, diabetic ulcers, and cancers as well as in pediatrics and animal health and wellness. The book also examines honey-based formulations, modern methods for chemical analysis of honey, and the history and reality of "mad honey." The final chapters cover honey in the food industry, as a nutrient, and for culinary use.
Interest in the molecular and mechanistic aspects of cosmetic research has grown exponentially during the past decade. Herbal Principles in Cosmetics: Properties and Mechanisms of Action critically examines the botanical, ethnopharmacological, phytochemical, and molecular aspects of botanical active ingredients used in cosmetics. Along with dermatological and cosmetic uses, the book also explores the toxicological aspects of these natural ingredients, maintaining a balanced view that carefully dissects the hype from the solid science. Contains Comprehensive Monographs of Herbs Useful for Skin Care & Diseases Authored by a panel of experts in cell physiology, phytochemistry, ethnopharmacology, applied botany, ethnobotany, and cosmetic science, the book begins with background in skin anatomy and physiology and also the classification, mechanisms of action, and application of herbal compounds. It provides monographs complete with therapeutic properties, specific action and dermatologic properties, toxicities, pictures, and references. The book also addresses the complexities of green biodiversity, including not only higher plants, but also mushrooms, algae, lichens, and bacteria – each chosen for their importance in traditional use, potential for innovation, or recent introduction to market. Includes a Vivid Color Insert with Photographs of Botanical Species Herbal Principles in Cosmetics: Properties and Mechanisms of Action is one of the few books devoted to the mechanisms of action of herbal compounds based on scientific analysis, making it an exceptionally valuable reference for pharmacologists, natural product chemists, skin physiologists, and dermatologists.
In use as a medicinal plant since time immemorial in Europe and the Middle East, chamomile is gaining popularity in the Americas, Australia, and Asia. The spectrum of disease conditions in which it is used in traditional medicine systems is, quite simply, mind boggling. There is, without a doubt, a growing demand for this plant and therefore a growing need for an updated ready reference for the researchers, cultivators, and entrepreneurs who wish to work with chamomile. Chamomile: Medicinal, Biochemical, and Agricultural Aspects is just that. Based on extensive research, this book provides the latest information on the medicinal, aromatic, and cultivation aspects of chamomile. It covers chamomile’s geographical distribution, taxonomy, chemistry, pharmacology, genetics, biochemistry, breeding, and cultivation. The book also discusses the profiles of the several medicinally active compounds of the oil and extracts and how their levels could be increased through breeding. The author highlights several potentially useful compounds discovered in the chamomile oil and extracts and discusses the cultivation and postharvest technology aspects of the plant in different agroclimatic zones including that of India. She presents guidelines on the good manufacturing practices laid out in different systems of medicine and provides an overview of the patents and products of chamomile especially important to researchers and entrepreneurs. Although there is a plethora of information available on chamomile, the challenge has been finding a central repository that covers all aspects of the plant. Some books provide general coverage, others focus on only on pharmacological uses, and many are outdated. This book examines all aspects from cultivation and harvesting, to essential oil content and profile as well as pharmacology and biotechnology. It is a reference for current information, an entry point for further study, a resource for using oils and extracts in product development, and a guide for following best agronomic practices.
With a history as ancient as any cultivated fruit, many believe the fig has been with us even longer than the pomegranate. The Ficus constitutes one of the largest and hardiest genera of flowering plants featuring as many as 750 species. Although the extraordinary mutualism between figs and their pollinating wasps has received much attention, the phylogeny of both partners is only beginning to be reconstructed. The fig plant does have a long history of traditional use as a medicine and has been a subject of significant modern research. Figs, the Genus Ficus brings together those histories, ancient and modern, to present an extraordinary profile of an extraordinary plant with an abundance of medical uses and a reputation as both a delicacy and a diet staple in some regions of the world. Several chapters within the book are devoted to intensive study of different parts of the tree: fruits, leaves, bark and stem, roots, and latex. These chapters discuss the Ficus genus as a whole, including the botany of the most important species that have been related to that particular part pharmacologically. The authors, Dr. Ephraim Lansky MD, highly respected as one of the world’s only physician pharmcognocists and Dr. Helena Paavilainen, a renowned researcher of natural products, go on to consider the chemistry and pharmacology of each part in selected Ficus species, and modern, medieval, and ancient methods for obtaining and preparing the beneficial components from that plant part for medicinal use. Special attention is paid to the plants' propensity for fighting inflammation, including cancer. Figs’ future potential is considered in a number of treatments, as are future areas of research. Includes a wealth of comparative tables for quick reference Provides dozens of illustrative and original high-quality photos as well as drawings and chemical structures Offers complete references after every chapter Figs, the Genus Ficus is a book in the CRC Press Series, Traditional Herbal Medicines for Modern Times, edited by Roland Hardman. Each volume in this series provides academia, health sciences, and the herbal medicines industry with in-depth coverage of the herbal remedies for infectious diseases, certain medical conditions, or the plant medicines of a particular country. Figs, the Ficus trees, are an understudied genus in modern pharmacognosy. This book present a multidisciplinary approach to the botany, chemistry, and pharmacology of fig trees and figs of the Ficus species, including the fig of commerce, Ficus carica, the rubber tree, Ficus elastic, and the Bo tree, Ficus religiosa. Traditional and current uses of figs in medicine are discussed in detail. The book also explores how figs and fig tree parts are processed, and the pharmacological basis underlying the potential efficacy of preparations is investigated in relation to their chemical composition. The book moves seamlessly from mythology to botany to ethnomedicine to pharmacology to phytochemistry.

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