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The Senate is a place where political minorities and individual members hold great power, resting on authority drawn from Senate rules and over two hundred years of related precedents and traditions. The minority has and will always have a clear and important voice on issues brought to the Senate floor, and it is this distinction from the majority rule of the House that has enabled the Senate to work as well as it has since our democracy's inception. Now in its third edition, Senate Procedure and Practice explains why and how the Senate has worked for more than 200 years. It includes the updated modifications of procedures governing Senate debate, amendment rights, and the formation of conferences. The book is filled with fascinating stories and insights that highlight why certain rules are in place, how they are practiced, and the ways in which those practices have changed throughout history as our federal government and the needs of our electorate have evolved. Anyone with an interest in the pillars of Senate procedure and practice will find a useful companion in this book.
The United States is often referred to as the world's greatest deliberative body. And that is for good reason. The Senate Chamber—from its inception to its Golden Age to the present day—has been the setting for some of the most moving, decisive, and consequential debates in American history. But how does the Senate work? Senate Procedure and Practice not only answers this question but also explains and illustrates why the Senate has worked so well for more than 200 years. This practical, real-world explanation focuses on the three pillars of legislative procedure: the Senate rules, the parliamentary interpretations of the Senate rules, and statutes that impose procedural rules. The book is filled with fascinating stories and insights that highlight why a given rule is in place and how it is practiced. Now in its second edition, the book has been updated to discuss the impact the Democratic takeover has had on basic Senate procedures and practices, including much-discussed Rule XXVIII.
(1) Historical Trends in Floor Consid.: Begin. 1789-1834; Original Court, 1789; John Crittenden, 1828; Comm. Referral, 1835-1867; Robert Grier, 1846; Tyler Pres., 1844-45; Increased Formalization, 1868-1922; Wm. Woods, 1880; George Badger, 1853; Ebenezer Hoar, 1869; Calendar Call Formalized, 1922-67; Wm. Douglas, 1939; Unan. Consent Agree., 1968 to present; Wm. Rehnquist, 1971; (2) Character. of Floor Action: Forms and Varieties of Dispos.; Dispos. and the Extent of Oppos.; Length and Days of Floor Action; Extended Consid. and Oppos.; Procedural Complexity; Optional Procedural Actions; Calling Up Nomin.; Proceed. in the Course of Floor Action; Procedural Complexity and Oppos.; Relation Among Character. of Proceed.
The second entry in the civics series clearly and concisely explains how the United States Senate works. The U.S. Senate is the second book in the Fundamentals of American Government civics series, exploring the inner workings of this important part of the legislative branch. As with Selecting a President, this book is written for all audiences, but voiced toward high school seniors and college freshmen—or any citizen interested in a concise yet authoritative exploration of this representative entity. Written by former Senator Tom Daschle, and co-written by acclaimed journalist Charles Robbins, this compelling and digestible book carefully examines and explains exactly how the Senate operates. From its electoral process to voting procedure, historic beginnings to modern day issues—there is no area of this governmental body left un-revealed. Told with an insider's perspective there is not a more defining or easily accessible compendium detailing the U.S. Senate.
"A treasure trove of parliamentary knowledge and wisdom" (Lee Demeter, Advisory Council, American Institute of Parliamentarians), "Riddick's Rules of Procedure" is certain to be "accepted universally for its elimination of useless procedures, its streamlined innovations, and its understandable vocabulary" (Hermon W. Farwell, Editor, the "Parliamentary Journal").