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Today, the debate over reparations--whether African-Americans should be compensated for decades of racial subjugation--stands as the most racially divisive issue in American politics. In this short, definitive work, Alfred L. Brophy, a leading expert on racial violence, traces the reparations issue from the 1820s to the present in order to assess the arguments on both sides of the current debate. Taking us inside litigation and legislatures past and present; examining failed and successful lawsuits; and exploring reparations actions by legislatures, newspapers, schools, businesses, and truth commissions, this book offers a valuable historical and legal perspective for reparations advocates and critics alike. "A book about reparations and its contentious qualities that is a must-read for all. If you want to know the essence of the debate, this book is for you." --Charles K. Ogletree, Jr., Harvard Law School
The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot was America's bloodiest civil disturbance of the century. In this text, Alfred Brophy draws on his own extensive research into contemporary accounts and court documents to chronicle this devastating riot, showing how and why the rule of law quickly eroded.
NEW FIELD, NEW CORN is an anthology of research papers that explore a range of topics from the rich legal history of the state of Alabama and its influential legal and judicial figures. Contemporary photography and maps are featured as well. “New Field, New Corn presents eight new essays on Alabama legal history from the pre-Civil War era through the Civil Rights era. These elegant and novel chapters survey a broad spectrum, from economics, race, education, and professional concerns of lawyers, to plain old legal doctrine, to show how those variables affected the state’s development. These essays reveal why we need intensive studies of American law at the state and county level in the 19th and 20th centuries. For they demonstrate that law is embedded in our culture. These invite many other studies, from the county level on up, in other states, to demonstrate how law lies at the center of nation’s history. They reaffirm my faith that there are many, many fascinating stories left to tell about our nation’s journey towards fulfilling the promises of law.” — Alfred L. Brophy Judge John J. Parker Distinguished Professor of Law University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill Author, Reparations: Pro and Con (2006) and Reconstructing the Dreamland (2002) “Alabama legal history can be surprising. Usually, this history is identified with dominant one-party politics, slavery, racial segregation, and limited social welfare. University of Alabama Law School legal historian Paul Pruitt’s collection of young lawyers’ research reveals a new field. It extends out from legal subjects, embracing new perceptions of law in society across Alabama history. The collection rests on broad research. Lawyers working in diverse fields have produced Alabama legal history that sets a new standard.” — Tony Freyer University Research Professor of History and Law, Emeritus University of Alabama Author, Hugo L. Black and the Dilemma of American Liberalism (2007), and coauthor, Democracy and Judicial Independence (1996) The volume’s contents include: • Bryan K. Fair’s Foreword: “Critiquing Our Present, Interrogating Our Past” • Paul M. Pruitt, Jr.’s Introduction: “Alabama Legal History as a Field of Study” • Warren Hoffman: “Developments of the Enclosure Movement in Alabama: Disrupting the Free Roaming” • Paul Rand: “Flush Times in the Chancery: A Brief Note on the History of Equity and Trusts” • Helen Eckinger: “The Militarization of the University of Alabama” • Eddie Lowe: “Economic Growth in Blount County/Onteonta: Attorneys, Companies, and Cases” • Mike Dodson: “Pioneers in Alabama Legal History: A Firm Understanding of the History of Alabama” • Courtney Cooper: “A Man in a Boy’s Coat: The Evolution of Alabama’s Constitutions” • Deirdra Drinkard: “The Uniform Beneath the Robe” • Ellie Campbell: “The ‘Breakthrough Verdict’: Strange v. State” A compelling new addition to the Legal History & Biography Series from Quid Pro Books.
An exceptional resource, this comprehensive reader brings together primary and secondary documents related to efforts to redress historical wrongs against African Americans. These varied efforts are often grouped together under the rubric “reparations movement,” and they are united in their goal of “repairing” the injustices that have followed from the long history of slavery and Jim Crow. Yet, as this collection reveals, there is a broad range of opinions as to the form that repair might take. Some advocates of redress call for apologies; others for official acknowledgment of wrongdoing; and still others for more tangible reparations: monetary compensation, government investment in disenfranchised communities, the restitution of lost property and rights, and repatriation. Written by activists and scholars of law, political science, African American studies, philosophy, economics, and history, the twenty-six essays include both previously published articles and pieces written specifically for this volume. Essays theorize the historical and legal bases of claims for redress; examine the history, strengths, and limitations of the reparations movement; and explore its relation to human rights and social justice movements in the United States and abroad. Other essays evaluate the movement’s primary strategies: legislation, litigation, and mobilization. While all of the contributors support the campaign for redress in one way or another, some of them engage with arguments against reparations. Among the fifty-three primary documents included in the volume are federal, state, and municipal acts and resolutions; declarations and statements from organizations including the Black Panther Party and the NAACP; legal briefs and opinions; and findings and directives related to the provision of redress, from the Oklahoma Commission to Study the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 to the mandate for the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Redress for Historical Injustices in the United States is a thorough assessment of the past, present, and future of the modern reparations movement. Contributors. Richard F. America, Sam Anderson, Martha Biondi, Boris L. Bittker, James Bolner, Roy L. Brooks, Michael K. Brown, Robert S. Browne, Martin Carnoy, Chiquita Collins, J. Angelo Corlett, Elliott Currie, William A. Darity, Jr., Adrienne Davis, Michael C. Dawson, Troy Duster, Dania Frank, Robert Fullinwider, Charles P. Henry, Gerald C. Horne, Robert Johnson, Jr., Robin D. G. Kelley, Jeffrey R. Kerr-Ritchie, Theodore Kornweibel, Jr., David Lyons, Michael T. Martin, Douglas S. Massey , Muntu Matsimela , C. J. Munford, Yusuf Nuruddin, Charles J. Ogletree Jr., Melvin L. Oliver, David B. Oppenheimer, Rovana Popoff, Thomas M. Shapiro, Marjorie M. Shultz, Alan Singer, David Wellman, David R. Williams, Eric K. Yamamoto, Marilyn Yaquinto
University, Court, and Slave reveals long-forgotten connections between pre-Civil War southern universities and slavery. Universities and their faculty owned people-sometimes dozens of people-and profited from their labor while many slaves endured physical abuse on campuses. The profits of enslaved labor helped pay for education, and faculty and students at times actively promoted the institution. They wrote about the history of slavery, argued for its central role in the southern economy, and developed a political theory that justified slavery. The university faculty spoke a common language of economic utility, history, and philosophy with those who made the laws for the southern states. Their extensive writing promoting slavery helps us understand how southern politicians and judges thought about the practice. As Alfred L. Brophy shows, southern universities fought the emancipation movement for economic reasons, but used history, philosophy, and law in an attempt to justify their position. Indeed, as the antislavery movement gained momentum, southern academics and their allies in the courts became bolder in their claims. Some went so far as to say that slavery was supported by natural law. The combination of economic reasoning and historical precedent helped shape a southern, proslavery jurisprudence. Following Lincoln's November 1860 election, southern academics joined politicians, judges, lawyers, and other leaders in arguing that their economy and society was threatened. Southern jurisprudence led them to believe that any threats to slavery and property justified secession. Bolstered by the courts, academics took their case to the southern public-and ultimately to the battlefield-to defend slavery. A path-breaking and deeply researched history of southern universities' investment in and defense of slavery, University, Court, and Slave will fundamentally transform our understanding of the institutional foundations of pro-slavery thought.
This book delves into the issue of reparations in relation to Palestinian refugees in their search for a solution to their displacement and dispossession. Highlighting the broad spectrum of reparations available as forms of remedy for a historical injustice, the author probes the reasons behind the failure to reach a reparations agreement till the present day and discusses the significance of issues of apology, recognition and acknowledgement of responsibility. In its approach, the book departs from traditional and modern perceptions of reparations as featuring in international law, history, politics and philosophy. The analysis is focused on a comparative study of two other cases - the German-Jewish reparations agreement of 1952 and the Cypriot conflict - in search of parameters that may constitute a framework to a potential reparations model applicable to the case of Palestinian refugees. When compared to the history of negotiations over reparations in the Israeli-Palestinian case, the findings of the comparison shed light on why reparations are still illusive. The book thus offers an explanation of why reparations to Palestinian refugees have failed, and offers suggestions on how to enhance prospects for reparations to Palestinian displacement and dispossessions. A unique contribution to the study of the Arab-Israeli peace process, this book will be an important reference for scholars of the Arab-Israeli conflict, and for students and scholars of politics, conflict resolution and history.
Hatch develops a robust rhetorical theory of reconciliation and applies it to contemporary national and global efforts to redress the racialized wounds and injustices created by slavery. What emerges from this work is a profound vision for the prospects of meaningful reparation, forgiveness, and reconciliation in American race relations.

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