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Crafted from authentic experiences shared by principals, Reality Calling: The Story of a Principal’s First Semester reveals fictional Principal Joe Gentry’s first few months on the job. We see his efforts to establish relationships with students, staff and community, handle unexpected (and sometimes unimaginable) events, and pursue the often elusive concept of instructional leadership. Throughout the process, Joe seeks guidance and support from his wife, mentors and two friends, who are also new principals. As the months roll by, he strives to navigate the complex ups and downs of school leadership, find personal and professional balance, apply the standards that govern school leaders and learn from his mistakes. This extended, real-world case study provides readers an authentic, unvarnished account of a fully-human principal knee deep in what is appropriately called the toughest job in education. The book concludes with Joe and his two principal friends reflecting on lessons learned and setting goals for the second half of the school year -- revealed in this book's companion, Seeking Balance: The Story of a Principal's Second Semester.
Seeking Balance: The Story of a Principal’s Second Semester continues the story of fictional Principal Joe Gentry’s first year on the job. Like its predecessor, Reality Calling: The Story of a Principal’s First Semester, this book is crafted from authentic experiences shared by principals. This part of the story picks up in January as Joe anticipates his mid-year evaluation. As winter turns to spring, he reflects on lessons learned and seeks to build on successes and correct his mistakes. Throughout, Joe seeks guidance and support from his wife, mentors, and two friends, who are also new principals. As the months roll by, he navigates the complexities of school leadership and seeks balance between personal and professional life, leadership and management, and theory and the real-world. This extended, real-world case study provides an authentic, unvarnished account of a fully-human principal knee deep in what is appropriately called the toughest job in education. The book concludes with Joe anticipating an end of the year meeting with his two friends to reflect on their progress toward becoming the leaders they have envisioned.
How can schools and their communities effectively prepare for and respond to emergencies? Or even a serious disruption? Mary Margaret Kerr, a nationally recognized expert in school crisis response and a leading urban educator, synthesizes and assembles the best practices of law enforcement, threat assessment, psychology, and communications in a single, streamlined volume. This practical guide prepares school personnel, including counselors and administrators, with the requisite skills at all crisis stages—from preparation and prevention to intervention and recovery. Dozens of actual cases illustrate key concepts and procedures, while allowing readers to assess their preparedness. Helpful forms and checklists help readers set priorities and ensure accountability. Interactive features encourage readers to reflect critically, consider solutions, and apply their skills.
Based partly on unpublished documents and oral information obtained from monks who headed major monasteries on mainland China, Holmes Welch presents a detailed description of the modern practice of Chinese Buddhism. Focusing on the actual rather than the theoretical observances of the religion, he gives an exhaustive account of the monastic system and the style of life of both monk and layman. His study makes new information available for the Western reader and calls into question the whole concept of the moribund state of Chinese Buddhism.
"W. Ross Yates has chosen for his subject a history of education in engineering, business, and related fields as they developed at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. This work is neither an official institutional history nor a call to the nostalgia of "old grads," but a scholar's summary of some major trends in education whose interweaving produced Lehigh University, with original objectives that survived good and bad fortune, good and indifferent management, and an unfailing (if at times flawed) attention to evolving national vocational and liberal educational ideals." "Asa Packer, builder of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, founded Lehigh University in 1865 to provide a useful, "common-sense" education for men planning careers in engineering, applied science, and the professions. He lavishly endowed it. With the declining fortunes of the Lehigh Valley Railroad in the 1890s, the university had to retrench, but it continued along lines laid down by Packer." "About the turn of the century Lehigh added programs for careers in teaching and business. With aid from alumni and industries, especially its neighbor, the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Lehigh built strong undergraduate programs in engineering, science, business administration, teacher education, and the liberal arts." "At every stage, Lehigh's development was bound up with the growth of a science-based society. Originally the interaction was most obvious at the local level. Situated in the industrial part of the lower Lehigh Valley in southeastern Pennsylvania, Lehigh was, until the First World War, removed from the large manufacturing and financial centers of the Atlantic seaboard and was intimately associated with local enterprises concentrating on anthracite coal, railroads, and heavy metals, especially iron, steel, and zinc." "After the First World War, Lehigh began forming a capacity for sponsored research and branching out into graduate education. With the conclusion of the Second World War, these moves were speeded up. Lehigh entered the mainstream of currents in science, engineering, and industrial management. It broadened its financial base, modernized its administration, built up its capacity in physics and chemistry, added programs leading to the M.B.A., Ph.D., and Ed.D. degrees, and organized research centers." "During the late 1960s student and faculty discontents, born of a collision between rapid internal growth and unsettling international situations, briefly delayed orderly progress. Trustees and administrators allayed discontents by bringing students and faculty into the work of administration." "By 1980 the university was still small by modern standards, having approximately 4,400 undergraduate and half as many graduate students. It had become coeducational and continued concentrating on vocational preparation for careers in engineering, science, business, and teaching, all within the context of a liberal arts emphasis on the human condition."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved