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The second edition of this widely acclaimed book maintains the author's original objective: to provide a clear and readable account of evidence law, which acknowledges the importance of arguments about facts and principles as well as rules. It is written
Practical Guide to Evidence provides a clear and readable account of the law of evidence, acknowledging the importance of arguments about facts and principles as well as rules. This fifth edition has been revised and updated to address recent changes in the law and debates on controversial topics such as surveillance and human rights. Coverage of expert evidence has also been expanded to include forensic evidence, bringing the text right up-to-date. Including enhanced pedagogical support such as chapter summaries, further reading advice and self-test exercises, this leading textbook can be used on both undergraduate and professional courses.
In the past several years, models of multi-tiered service delivery have emerged as a framework for supporting the needs of school-aged children in schools across the country and have received much attention in scholarly publications of education and related fields. Despite the needs of young children and the promise of early intervention, however, models of multi-tiered service delivery are only in the beginning stages of development in early childhood education settings such as preschools. This text provides early-childhood professionals with an introduction to tiered service delivery and practical considerations in the implementation of a multi-tier system of supports with particular emphasis on early childhood law and ethics, assessment and intervention, developmental disabilities, and family engagement.
Over the last twenty or so years, it has become standard to require policy makers to base their recommendations on evidence. That is now uncontroversial to the point of triviality--of course, policy should be based on the facts. But are the methods that policy makers rely on to gather and analyze evidence the right ones? In Evidence-Based Policy, Nancy Cartwright, an eminent scholar, and Jeremy Hardie, who has had a long and successful career in both business and the economy, explain that the dominant methods which are in use now--broadly speaking, methods that imitate standard practices in medicine like randomized control trials--do not work. They fail, Cartwright and Hardie contend, because they do not enhance our ability to predict if policies will be effective. The prevailing methods fall short not just because social science, which operates within the domain of real-world politics and deals with people, differs so much from the natural science milieu of the lab. Rather, there are principled reasons why the advice for crafting and implementing policy now on offer will lead to bad results. Current guides in use tend to rank scientific methods according to the degree of trustworthiness of the evidence they produce. That is valuable in certain respects, but such approaches offer little advice about how to think about putting such evidence to use. Evidence-Based Policy focuses on showing policymakers how to effectively use evidence, explaining what types of information are most necessary for making reliable policy, and offers lessons on how to organize that information.

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