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Practical Guide to Evidence provides a clear and readable account of the law of evidence, acknowledging the importance of arguments about facts and principles as well as rules. The fourth edition has been revised and updated to address the radical changes brought about by the Criminal Justice Act 2003, particularly in relation to hearsay, character evidence and opinion evidence and to expand coverage of the Human Rights Act 1998. Particular attention is given to changes made by the revised Codes of Practice, and to the growing body of case law on topics such as reverse burden of proof, the cross-examination of rape victims, evidence obtained by entrapment, and silence in the face of police questioning. Now including enhanced pedagogical support such as chapter summaries, further reading advice and boxed examples, this leading textbook can be used on both undergraduate and professional courses.
Practical Guide to Evidence provides a clear and readable account of the law of evidence, acknowledging the importance of arguments about facts and principles as well as rules. This fifth edition has been revised and updated to address recent changes in the law and debates on controversial topics such as surveillance and human rights. Coverage of expert evidence has also been expanded to include forensic evidence, bringing the text right up-to-date. Including enhanced pedagogical support such as chapter summaries, further reading advice and self-test exercises, this leading textbook can be used on both undergraduate and professional courses.
A number of other areas have been added dealing with Parliamentary changes to the treatment of child and mentally incompetent witnesses, preliminary inquiry evidence at trial and prohibited cross-examination of the accused. There is expanded discussion in areas such as the rule against collateral facts, the evidence of children and persons who may be mentally incompetent, the derivative confessions rule and the right to remain silent and specific presumptions."--pub. desc.
In the past several years, models of multi-tiered service delivery have emerged as a framework for supporting the needs of school-aged children in schools across the country and have received much attention in scholarly publications of education and related fields. Despite the needs of young children and the promise of early intervention, however, models of multi-tiered service delivery are only in the beginning stages of development in early childhood education settings such as preschools. This text provides early-childhood professionals with an introduction to tiered service delivery and practical considerations in the implementation of a multi-tier system of supports with particular emphasis on early childhood law and ethics, assessment and intervention, developmental disabilities, and family engagement.
Over the last twenty or so years, it has become standard to require policy makers to base their recommendations on evidence. That is now uncontroversial to the point of triviality--of course, policy should be based on the facts. But are the methods that policy makers rely on to gather and analyze evidence the right ones? In Evidence-Based Policy, Nancy Cartwright and Jeremy Hardie explain that the dominant methods which are in use now--broadly speaking, methods that imitate standard practices in medicine like randomized control trials--do not work. They fail, Cartwright and Hardie contend, because they do not enhance our ability to predict if policies will be effective.

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