Download Free Open Book The Inside Track To Law School Success Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Open Book The Inside Track To Law School Success and write the review.

Open Book: The Inside Track to Law School Success, 2E is a book that every JD and LLM law student needs to read, either before classes start or as they get going in their 1L year. Now in an expanded second edition, the book explains in a clear and easygoing, conversational manner what law professors expect from their students both in classes and exams. The authors, award-winning teachers with a wealth of classroom experience, give students an inside look at law school by explaining how, despite appearances to the contrary, classes connect to exams and exams connect to the practice of law. Open Book introduces them to the basic structure of our legal system and to the distinctive features of legal reasoning. To prepare students for exams, the book explains in clear and careful detail what exams are designed to test. It then devotes a single, clearly written chapter to each step of the process of answering exams. It also contains a wealth of material, both in the book and digitally, on preparing for exams. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, Open Book comes with a free suite of 18 actual law school exams in Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property and Torts, written and administered by law professors. These exams include not only questions, but: (1) annotations from the professors explaining what they were looking for; (2) model answers written by the professors themselves; and (3) actual student answers, with professor comments that explain why certain answers were stronger of weaker. As Open Book explains, there is no better way to prepare for exams than by practicing, and these unique materials will enable students to get the most out of their pre-exam practice.
Today's threats against freedom of speech echo the hysteria of World War I, when Americans went to prison for dissent. This cautionary tale focuses on events in Montana and the West that led to the suspension of this crucial right.
A memoir-meets-exposé that examines our fraught relationship with the West and our attempts to clean up a toxic environmental legacy In 2002, Texas journalist Brad Tyer strapped a canoe on his truck and moved to Montana, a state that has long exerted a mythic pull on America’s imagination as an unspoiled landscape. The son of an engineer who reclaimed wastewater, Tyer was looking for a pristine river to call his own. What he found instead was a century’s worth of industrial poison clotting the Clark Fork River, a decades-long engineering project to clean it up, and a forgotten town named Opportunity. At the turn of the nineteenth century, Montana exploited the richest copper deposits in the world, fueling the electric growth of twentieth-century America and building some of the nation’s most outlandish fortunes. The toxic by-product of those fortunes—what didn’t spill into the river—was dumped in Opportunity. In the twenty-first century, Montana’s draw is no longer metal but landscape: the blue-ribbon trout streams and unspoiled wilderness of the nation’s “last best place.” To match reality to the myth, affluent exurbanites and well-meaning environmentalists are trying to restore the Clark Fork River to its “natural state.” In the process, millions of tons of toxic soils are being removed and dumped—once again—in Opportunity. As Tyer investigates Opportunity’s history, he wrestles with questions of environmental justice and the ethics of burdening one community with an entire region’s waste. Stalled at the intersection of a fading extractive economy and a fledgling restoration boom, Opportunity’s story is a secret history of the American Dream and a key to understanding the country’s—and increasingly the globe’s—demand for modern convenience. As Tyer explores the degradations of the landscape, he also probes the parallel emotional geography of familial estrangement. Part personal history and part reportorial narrative, Opportunity, Montana is a story of progress and its price: of copper and water, of father and son, and of our attempts to redeem the mistakes of the past. From the Hardcover edition.
“At a time when policing in America is at a crossroads, Barry Friedman provides much-needed insight, analysis, and direction in his thoughtful new book. Unwarranted illuminates many of the often ignored issues surrounding how we police in America and highlights why reform is so urgently needed. This revealing book comes at a critically important time and has much to offer all who care about fair treatment and public safety.” —Bryan Stevenson, founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative and author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption In June 2013, documents leaked by Edward Snowden sparked widespread debate about secret government surveillance of Americans. Just over a year later, the shooting of Michael Brown, a black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, set off protests and triggered concern about militarization of law enforcement and discriminatory policing. In Unwarranted, Barry Friedman argues that these two seemingly disparate events are connected—and that the problem is not so much the policing agencies as it is the rest of us. We allow these agencies to operate in secret and to decide how to police us, rather than calling the shots ourselves. And the courts, which we depended upon to supervise policing, have let us down entirely. Unwarranted tells the stories of ordinary people whose lives were torn apart by policing—by the methods of cops on the beat and those of the FBI and NSA. Driven by technology, policing has changed dramatically. Once, cops sought out bad guys; today, increasingly militarized forces conduct wide surveillance of all of us. Friedman captures the eerie new environment in which CCTV, location tracking, and predictive policing have made suspects of us all, while proliferating SWAT teams and increased use of force have put everyone’s property and lives at risk. Policing falls particularly heavily on minority communities and the poor, but as Unwarranted makes clear, the effects of policing are much broader still. Policing is everyone’s problem. Police play an indispensable role in our society. But our failure to supervise them has left us all in peril. Unwarranted is a critical, timely intervention into debates about policing, a call to take responsibility for governing those who govern us.
Get the information you need to get TOP grades in law school. For many, the road to law school success seems blocked by obstacles and filled with potholes. But learning the law and getting good grades on your law school exams is really not that difficult. You just need someone to show you the way. "The 1L Success Guide" was written by someone who graduated FIRST in his law school class. He shares the methods by which he learned the law and aced his law school exams, earning NINE high-paper awards in the process. If you want to understand how to succeed in law school and get the high grades you will need to land top jobs, read this book. *** From the Introduction: Why must law school feel like Special Forces hazing? By the end of the first semester, you are totally beaten down mentally and physically, and then they throw the exams at you. And, by the way, who is hiding the keys to the kingdom? Why does it feel like there is a secretive law school society that refuses to impart to you the method for actually succeeding? I have one thing to say about all that: It is stupid nonsense. That is why I wrote this book. It is what I wish I could have read before I started law school. Inside these pages I will show you how to prepare for and succeed during your first semester of law school, which culminates with those terrifying exams. It actually is not that difficult once you know what to do. I promise. Although the information in this book is targeted to students in their first semester of law school, this information will be useful to anyone needing some extra figuring out the law school beast. If you had a tough time your first semester and are looking for guidance to help you improve, you will find it in this book. But first, why should you listen to me? I remember how scared and disoriented I felt when I took my first set of law school final exams. My first semester of law school consisted of hours and hours studying, outlining, reviewing, practicing, and memorizing in the hope that I was doing something right. During that semester, I essentially ignored my wife and young child and gained twenty pounds from stress eating and lack of sleep. I went from the relaxed dude with a cool wife and new son, to the stressed out jerk who is always thinking about what needs to get done instead of enjoying life. It sucked. Then, after I took those first exams, after those two weeks of hell on earth, I was so shaken that I thought I had failed each and every exam. I could not respond to any of the questions with a solid answer, so I just tried to analyze every issue I saw (or thought I saw). My answers seemed ambiguous and unfinished. I knew I was screwed. Once I had completed all my first semester exams, I told my wife as I guzzled a beer how much I hated law school and how I was thinking about dropping out, returning to my prior career, and looking for a teaching position. Here's the rub. When I got my grades for first semester exams, I saw that, contrary to what I believed, I had actually done very well on the tests. In fact, I was ranked first in my class! *** I can't guarantee that you will finish first in your class if you read this book, but I can guarantee the book will provide you with an overview of what it takes to do well in law school. Whether you put in the work to achieve great things is up to you.
In recent years, the justices of the Supreme Court have ruled definitively on such issues as abortion, school prayer, and military tribunals in the war on terror. They decided one of American history's most contested presidential elections. Yet for all their power, the justices never face election and hold their offices for life. This combination of influence and apparent unaccountability has led many to complain that there is something illegitimate—even undemocratic—about judicial authority. In The Will of the People, Barry Friedman challenges that claim by showing that the Court has always been subject to a higher power: the American public. Judicial positions have been abolished, the justices' jurisdiction has been stripped, the Court has been packed, and unpopular decisions have been defied. For at least the past sixty years, the justices have made sure that their decisions do not stray too far from public opinion. Friedman's pathbreaking account of the relationship between popular opinion and the Supreme Court—from the Declaration of Independence to the end of the Rehnquist court in 2005—details how the American people came to accept their most controversial institution and shaped the meaning of the Constitution.
1000 Days to the Bar explains the relationship between the professional practice of law and the practice you need to perform each week to achieve your objectives. This unique guide is designed to empower first-year law students by presenting the components for academic success in a step-by-step format that lays out a practice-centered approach to legal studies. Book jacket.

Best Books