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Why buy our paperbacks? Standard Font size of 10 for all books High Quality Paper Fulfilled by Amazon Expedited shipping 30 Days Money Back Guarantee BEWARE of Low-quality sellers Don't buy cheap paperbacks just to save a few dollars. Most of them use low-quality papers & binding. Their pages fall off easily. Some of them even use very small font size of 6 or less to increase their profit margin. It makes their books completely unreadable. How is this book unique? Unabridged (100% Original content) Formatted for e-reader Font adjustments & biography included Illustrated About On The Decay Of The Art Of Lying by Mark Twain In 1880, the great American author and humorist Mark Twain wrote his essay "On the Decay of the Art of Lying" for a Historical and Antiquarian Club meeting in Hartford, Connecticut. Twain's humorous and satirical voice is in full flower, as he discusses the universal pastime of lying, and suggests that judicious lying should be encouraged and cultivated - as long as one strives "...to lie with a good object, and not an evil one; to lie for others' advantage, and not our own; to lie healingly, charitably, humanely, not cruelly, hurtfully, maliciously..." This short work is part of Applewood's "American Roots" series, tactile mementos of American passions by some of America's most famous writers and thinkers.
On the Decay of the Art of Lying is a short essay by Mark Twain from 1885. In it he deplores that way man's "most faithful friend" is being used and indeed misused, declaring that "the wise thing is for us diligently to train ourselves to lie thoughtfully, judiciously; to lie with a good object, and not an evil one; to lie for others' advantage, and not our own; to lie healingly, charitably, humanely, not cruelly, hurtfully, maliciously; to lie gracefully and graciously, not awkwardly and clumsily; to lie firmly, frankly, squarely, with head erect, not haltingly, tortuously, with pusillanimous mien, as being ashamed of our high calling."
This is the COMPLETE WORKS of America's favourite storyteller Mark Twain. The eBook contains every novel, short story - even the very rare ones ñ essay, travel book, non-fiction text, letter and much, much more! . (Current Version: 3) Features: * ALL 12 novels, with concise introductions and contents tables * images of how the books first appeared, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts * includes Twain's rare unfinished novel 'The Mysterious Stranger', often missed out of collections * ALL of the short stories, with quality formatting * the short stories have their own chronological and alphabetical contents tables - find that special story easily! * Twain's 20 short story contributions to "The Library of Humor", with their own contents table * even INCLUDES Twain's complete letters, essays and satires - with their own special contents tables * ALL of the travel writing, with contents tables * includes Twain's "Chapters from My Autobiography" * SPECIAL BONUS texts, including three contemporary Twain biographies - explore the great man's amazing life in Paine's and Howells' famous biographies! * UPDATED with a special literary criticism section, with various works exploring Twain's contribution to literature * UPDATED with Archibald Henderson's critical study MARK TWAIN * UPDATED with the complete speeches * scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres The eBook also includes a front no-nonsense table of contents to allow easy navigation around Twain's immense oeuvre. Welcome to hours upon hours upon hours of reading one of literature's most famous storytellers! CONTENTS The Novels THE GILDED AGE: A TALE OF TODAY THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN and many more! The Short Stories (too many to list!) CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF SHORT STORIES ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SHORT STORIES MARK TWAIN'S LIBRARY OF HUMOR The Essays and Satires LIST OF TWAIN'S ESSAYS AND SATIRES The Travel Writing THE INNOCENTS ABROAD ROUGHING IT A TRAMP ABROAD FOLLOWING THE EQUATOR SOME RAMBLING NOTES OF AN IDLE EXCURSION The Non-Fiction OLD TIMES ON THE MISSISSIPPI and many more! The Letters THE COMPLETE LETTERS OF MARK TWAIN The Speeches THE COMPLETE SPEECHES The Criticism MARK TWAIN BY ARCHIBALD HENDERSON MARK TWAIN BY BRANDER MATTHEWS THE AMERICANS BY DAVID CHRISTIE MURRAY MARK TWAIN BY FREDERICK WADDY NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLES The Biographies CHAPTERS FROM MY AUTOBIOGRAPHY BY M.TWAIN MY MARK TWAIN BY WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS MARK TWAIN A BIOGRAPHY BY A.B. PAINE THE BOYS' LIFE OF MARK TWAIN BY A. B. PAINE
Two or three persons having at different times intimated that if I would write an autobiography they would read it, when they got leisure, I yield at last to this frenzied public demand, and herewith tender my history: Ours is a noble old house, and stretches a long way back into antiquity. The earliest ancestor the Twains have any record of was a friend of the family by the name of Higgins. This was in the eleventh century, when our people were living in Aberdeen, county of Cork, England. Why it is that our long line has ever since borne the maternal name (except when one of them now and then took a playful refuge in an alias to avert foolishness), instead of Higgins, is a mystery which none of us has ever felt much desire to stir. It is a kind of vague, pretty romance, and we leave it alone. All the old families do that way. Arthour Twain was a man of considerable note—a solicitor on the highway in William Rufus' time. At about the age of thirty he went to one of those fine old English places of resort called Newgate, to see about something, and never returned again. While there he died suddenly. Augustus Twain, seems to have made something of a stir about the year 1160. He was as full of fun as he could be, and used to take his old sabre and sharpen it up, and get in a convenient place on a dark night, and stick it through people as they went by, to see them jump. He was a born humorist. But he got to going too far with it; and the first time he was found stripping one of these parties, the authorities removed one end of him, and put it up on a nice high place on Temple Bar, where it could contemplate the people and have a good time. He never liked any situation so much or stuck to it so long.
Where does the Twain meet? As observer and reporter. As teacher and preacher. With a twinkle in his eye. With whimsy in his heart. Twain indeed speaks volumes for himself through his newspaper stories, humorous columns, letters, speeches, and interviews, gathered together here for the first time in one paperback volume and providing a picture of the consummate writer, unabashed, critical, and cutting. A perfect title for every Twain collection.
Wilde presents the essay in a Socratic dialogue, with the characters of Vivian and Cyril having a conversation throughout. The conversation, although playful and whimsical, promotes Wilde's view of Romanticism over Realism. Vivian tells Cyril of an article he has been writing called "The Decay Of Lying: A Protest". In the article Vivian defends Aestheticism and "Art for Art's sake". As summarized by Vivian, it contains four doctrines: Art never expresses anything but itself. All bad art comes from returning to Life and Nature, and elevating them into ideals. Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life. Lying, the telling of beautiful untrue things, is the proper aim of Art. The essay ends with the two characters going outside, as Cyril asked Vivian to do at the beginning of the essay. Vivian finally complies, saying that twilight nature's "chief use" may be to "illustrate quotations from the poets."

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