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More than three hundred photographs complement a collection of essays by a group of leading native American scholars, writers, tribal leaders, and activists that address such topics as Native American history, philosophy, folkways, culture, artwork, religion, and more, divided into three major sections entitled "Our Universes," "Our Lives," and "Our Peoples." Reprint. 12,500 first printing.
The Native Universe and Museums in the Twenty-First Century explores from a global perspective the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. Eight essays--presented at the museum's Opening International Symposium in September 2004 and written by museum professionals from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States--address the representation and interpretation of indigenous peoples in museums, the role of contemporary artists in the museum's work, and the responsibility of institutions like NMAI to support contemporary Native cultures and arts.
"The modern version of The Tao of Physics. . . We gain tantalizing glimpses of an elusive alternative to the thing we know as science. . . . Above all, Peat's book is an eloquent plea for a fair go for the modes of enquiry of other cultures." --New Scientist One summer in the 1980s, theoretical physicist F. David Peat went to a Blackfoot Sun Dance ceremony. Having spent all of his life steeped in and influenced by linear Western science, he was entranced by the Native American worldview and, through dialogue circles between scientists and native elders, he began to explore it in greater depth. Blackfoot Physics is the account of his discoveries. In an edifying synthesis of anthropology, history, metaphysics, cosmology, and quantum theory, Peat compares the medicines, the myths, the languages—the entire perceptions of reality of the Western and indigenous peoples. What becomes apparent is the amazing resemblance between indigenous teachings and some of the insights that are emerging from modern science, a congruence that is as enlightening about the physical universe as it is about the circular evolution of humanity’s understanding. Through Peat’s insightful observations, he extends our understanding of ourselves, our understanding of the universe, and how the two intersect in a meaningful vision of human life in relation to a greater reality.
Mushikiwabo is a Rwandan working as a translator in Washington when she learns that most of her family back home has been killed in a conspiracy meticulously planned by the state. First comes shock, then aftershock, three months of it, during which her worst fears are confirmed: The same state apparatus has duped millions of Rwandans into butchering nearly a million of their neighbors. Years earlier, her brother Lando wrote her a letter she never got until now. Urged on by it, she rummages into their farm childhood, and into family corners alternately dark, loving, and humorous. She searches for stray mementos of the lost, then for their roots. What she finds is that and more---hints, roots, of the 1994 crime that killed her family. Her narrative takes the reader on a journey from the days the world and Rwanda discovered each other back to colonial period when pseudoscientific ideas about race put the nation on a highway bound for the 1994 genocide. Seven years of full-time collaboration by two writers---and the faith of family and friends---went into this emotionally charged work. Rwanda Means the Universe is at once a celebration of the lives of the lost and homage to their past, but it's no comfortable tribute. It's an expression of dogged hope in the face of modern evil.
Since first contact, Natives and newcomers have been involved in an increasingly complex struggle over power and identity. Modern “Indian wars” are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. In cultural and political arenas across North America, Natives enact and newcomers protest issues of traditionalism, sovereignty, and self-determination. In these struggles over domination and resistance, over different ideologies and Indian identities, neither Natives nor other North Americans recognize the significance of being rooted together in history and culture, or how representations of “Indianness” set them in opposition to each other. In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture, Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. She reflects on treaty rights and traditionalism, media warriors, Indian princesses, powwow, museums, art, and nationhood. According to Valaskakis, Native and non-Native people construct both who they are and their relations with each other in narratives that circulate through art, anthropological method, cultural appropriation, and Native reappropriation. For Native peoples and Others, untangling the past—personal, political, and cultural—can help to make sense of current struggles over power and identity that define the Native experience today. Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of “Indian” experience (including the author’s), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. This book is an important contribution to Native studies that will appeal to anyone interested in First Nations’ experience and popular culture.
"""The beings on Zeta Reticuli are the future selves -- granted, several million years into the future -- of the beings on Earth right now. On the soul line, this has to do with your evolution to become more, to be more established benevolently on a creative level. By the time your souls become those Zeta Reticulian beings several million years into the future, you will be able to interact with all life in the most benevolent way while being strongly intellectual and scientific. ""In this way, your science will have a complete balance with heart and soul. This is one of the greatest aspects of significance between you and the Zeta Reticulian beings as of this time. So to them you are their past lives -- that's why they're so fascinated with you -- but for you, when you interact with these beings, you are truly meeting, in many senses, your future."" -- Zoosh through Robert Shapiro ""If you can do nothing else when you read this book, look around on your planet. Look at all the different forms of life and know that from the smallest to the largest, they all have cousins on other planets. And while they might not look exactly the same on other planets, there are similarities that you would notice, not unlike how you notice similarities from one family member to another. They do not look identical, but there are similarities. When you travel, you will note that, but when you return, you will always be happy to be home. Welcome to the universe"" -- Joopah through Robert Shapiro"
The book defines the broad parameters of social change for Native Nations in the 21st century, as well as their prospects for cultural continuity. It will be an excellent resource for use in sociology, ethnic studies or Native American studies classes. Champagne teaches with his collection for a course that usually has 100-140 students each term. Many of the themes Champagne tackles are of general interest in the study of social change, from governmental, economic, religious, and environmental perspectives. Issues of cultural continuity are central to Native American studies programs, and the book would be valuable for use in introductory courses in Native American studies, but is designed for graduate students and undergraduates, especially in Indian studies.

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