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The Moonlit Road is a short story by Ambrose Bierce. Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (born June 24, 1842, assumed to have died sometime after December 26, 1913) was an American editorialist, journalist, short story writer, fabulist, and satirist. He wrote the short story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and compiled a satirical lexicon The Devil's Dictionary. His vehemence as a critic, his motto "Nothing matters", and the sardonic view of human nature that informed his work, all earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce". Despite his reputation as a searing critic, Bierce was known to encourage younger writers, including poet George Sterling and fiction writer W. C. Morrow. Bierce employed a distinctive style of writing, especially in his stories. His style often embraces an abrupt beginning, dark imagery, vague references to time, limited descriptions, impossible events and the theme of war. In 1913, Bierce traveled to Mexico to gain first-hand experience of the Mexican Revolution. While traveling with rebel troops, he disappeared without a trace. Bierce was considered a master of pure English by his contemporaries, and virtually everything that came from his pen was notable for its judicious wording and economy of style. He wrote in a variety of literary genres. His short stories are held among the best of the 19th century, providing a popular following based on his roots. He wrote realistically of the terrible things he had seen in the war in such stories as "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "The Boarded Window", "Killed at Resaca", and "Chickamauga". In addition to his ghost and war stories, he also published several volumes of poetry. His Fantastic Fables anticipated the ironic style of grotesquerie that became a more common genre in the 20th century. One of Bierce's most famous works is his much-quoted book, The Devil's Dictionary, originally an occasional newspaper item which was first published in book form in 1906 as The Cynic's Word Book. It consists of satirical definitions of English words which lampoon cant and political double-talk. Under the entry "leonine", meaning a single line of poetry with an internal rhyming scheme, he included an apocryphal couplet written by the fictitious "Bella Peeler Silcox" (i.e. Ella Wheeler Wilcox) in which an internal rhyme is achieved in both lines only by mispronouncing the rhyming words: The electric light invades the dunnest deep of Hades. Cries Pluto, 'twixt his snores: "O tempora! O mores! Bierce's twelve-volume Collected Works were published in 1909, the seventh volume of which consists solely of The Devil's Dictionary, the title Bierce himself preferred to The Cynic's Word Book.
Features recipes that incorporate foods indigenous to the United States to celebrate Native American culture, diet, ceremony, and history
This handy cookbook is an enjoyable and informative guide to the rich culinary traditions of the American Indians of the Southwest. Featured are 150 authentic fruit, grain, and vegetable recipes?foods that have been prepared by generations of Apaches, Zunis, Navajos, Havasupais, Yavapais, Pimas, and Pueblos. These tasty, unique dishes include mesquite pudding, Navajo blue bread, hominy, cherry corn bread, and yucca hash. American Indian Cooking also boasts wonderfully detailed illustrations of dozens of edible wild plants and essential information on their history, use, and importance. Many of these plants can be obtained by mail; a list of mail-order sources in the back of the book allows everyone to sample and savor these distinctive, natural recipes.
Provides more than two hundred recipes for traditional Southern dishes, and traces the history and heritage of the Tuskegee Institute through photographs, quotations, and journal excerpts.
"The Encyclopedia details subjects traditionally associated with Appalachia - folklore, handcrafts, mountain music, food, and coal mining - but goes far beyond regional stereotypes to treat such wide-ranging topics as the aerospace industry, Native American foodways, ethnic diversity in the coalfields, education reform, linguistic variation, and the contested notion of what it means to be Appalachian, both inside and outside the region." "Researched and developed by the Center for Appalachian Studies and Services at East Tennessee State University, this 1,864-page compendium includes all thirteen states that constitute the northern, central, and southern subregions of Appalachia - from New York to Mississippi. With entries on everything from Adventists to zinc mining, the Encyclopedia of Appalachia is a one-stop guide to all things Appalachian."--BOOK JACKET.
The Berlin Cookbook reveals how to make Schnitzel, Currywurst, Eisbein, Doner Kebap, and those jelly donuts known as Berliners-and how easy it is, since Berlin cuisine is simple, wholesome, and down-to-earth. This cookbook offers traditional recipes and also tells stories about the heritage of Berlin food: how Eisbein got its name, why Friedrich II made Prussian farmers plant potatoes, how meatballs were imported by Huguenots, and how Bismarck got his herring."

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