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Native American recipes for such dishes as cattail biscuits, fish ice cream, and stuffed squash blossoms. Includes information on Indian cooking and food.
Prepare for Microsoft Exam 70-761–and help demonstrate your real-world mastery of SQL Server 2016 Transact-SQL data management, queries, and database programming. Designed for experienced IT professionals ready to advance their status, Exam Ref focuses on the critical-thinking and decision-making acumen needed for success at the MCSA level. Focus on the expertise measured by these objectives: • Filter, sort, join, aggregate, and modify data • Use subqueries, table expressions, grouping sets, and pivoting • Query temporal and non-relational data, and output XML or JSON • Create views, user-defined functions, and stored procedures • Implement error handling, transactions, data types, and nulls This Microsoft Exam Ref: • Organizes its coverage by exam objectives • Features strategic, what-if scenarios to challenge you • Assumes you have experience working with SQL Server as a database administrator, system engineer, or developer • Includes downloadable sample database and code for SQL Server 2016 SP1 (or later) and Azure SQL Database Querying Data with Transact-SQL About the Exam Exam 70-761 focuses on the skills and knowledge necessary to manage and query data and to program databases with Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2016. About Microsoft Certification Passing this exam earns you credit toward a Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) certification that demonstrates your mastery of essential skills for building and implementing on-premises and cloud-based databases across organizations. Exam 70-762 (Developing SQL Databases) is also required for MCSA: SQL 2016 Database Development certification. See full details at: microsoft.com/learning
Features recipes that incorporate foods indigenous to the United States to celebrate Native American culture, diet, ceremony, and history
The Moonlit Road is a short story by Ambrose Bierce. Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (born June 24, 1842, assumed to have died sometime after December 26, 1913) was an American editorialist, journalist, short story writer, fabulist, and satirist. He wrote the short story "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and compiled a satirical lexicon The Devil's Dictionary. His vehemence as a critic, his motto "Nothing matters", and the sardonic view of human nature that informed his work, all earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce". Despite his reputation as a searing critic, Bierce was known to encourage younger writers, including poet George Sterling and fiction writer W. C. Morrow. Bierce employed a distinctive style of writing, especially in his stories. His style often embraces an abrupt beginning, dark imagery, vague references to time, limited descriptions, impossible events and the theme of war. In 1913, Bierce traveled to Mexico to gain first-hand experience of the Mexican Revolution. While traveling with rebel troops, he disappeared without a trace. Bierce was considered a master of pure English by his contemporaries, and virtually everything that came from his pen was notable for its judicious wording and economy of style. He wrote in a variety of literary genres. His short stories are held among the best of the 19th century, providing a popular following based on his roots. He wrote realistically of the terrible things he had seen in the war in such stories as "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge", "The Boarded Window", "Killed at Resaca", and "Chickamauga". In addition to his ghost and war stories, he also published several volumes of poetry. His Fantastic Fables anticipated the ironic style of grotesquerie that became a more common genre in the 20th century. One of Bierce's most famous works is his much-quoted book, The Devil's Dictionary, originally an occasional newspaper item which was first published in book form in 1906 as The Cynic's Word Book. It consists of satirical definitions of English words which lampoon cant and political double-talk. Under the entry "leonine", meaning a single line of poetry with an internal rhyming scheme, he included an apocryphal couplet written by the fictitious "Bella Peeler Silcox" (i.e. Ella Wheeler Wilcox) in which an internal rhyme is achieved in both lines only by mispronouncing the rhyming words: The electric light invades the dunnest deep of Hades. Cries Pluto, 'twixt his snores: "O tempora! O mores! Bierce's twelve-volume Collected Works were published in 1909, the seventh volume of which consists solely of The Devil's Dictionary, the title Bierce himself preferred to The Cynic's Word Book.
This handy cookbook is an enjoyable and informative guide to the rich culinary traditions of the American Indians of the Southwest. Featured are 150 authentic fruit, grain, and vegetable recipes?foods that have been prepared by generations of Apaches, Zunis, Navajos, Havasupais, Yavapais, Pimas, and Pueblos. These tasty, unique dishes include mesquite pudding, Navajo blue bread, hominy, cherry corn bread, and yucca hash. American Indian Cooking also boasts wonderfully detailed illustrations of dozens of edible wild plants and essential information on their history, use, and importance. Many of these plants can be obtained by mail; a list of mail-order sources in the back of the book allows everyone to sample and savor these distinctive, natural recipes.
This practical primer on natural foods not only provides recipes for a variety of dishes that are uniquely Native American but also identifies and describes the uses of specific ceremonial, medicinal, and sacred plants. From clambakes, corn chowders, and turkey with oyster cornbread stuffing, to flavored butters, sunflower seed cakes, and wild strawberry bread, the author offers a unique book that is simultaneously a field guide, cookbook, and useful manual on herbal medicines — all interwoven with Native American wisdom.

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