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Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Water Resources Monograph Series, Volume 19. What are the forms and processes characteristic of mountain rivers and how do we know them? Mountain Rivers Revisited, an expanded and updated version of the earlier volume Mountain Rivers, answers these questions and more. Here is the only comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge about mountain rivers available. While continuing to focus on physical process and form in mountain rivers, the text also addresses the influences of tectonics, climate, and land use on rivers, as well as water chemistry, hyporheic exchange, and riparian and aquatic ecology. With its numerous illustrations and references, hydrologists, geomorphologists, civil and environmental engineers, ecologists, resource planners, and their students will find this book an essential resource. Ellen Wohl received her Ph.D. in geology in 1988 from the University of Arizona. Since then, she has worked primarily on mountain and bedrock rivers in diverse environments.
This pioneering book addresses the entirety of river flooding issues in the Upper Vistula Basin, where considerable flood generation potential exists. It analyses the factors influencing flood risk, investigates variations in observation records and discusses projections for the future and adaptation to changing risk. It serves the general interest in understanding the floods that cause massive destruction in Europe, with dozens of fatalities and tremendous material damages. This interdisciplinary book, which covers aspects of climatology, geomorphology, hydrology, and water and flood risk management, unveils the complexity of the current situation. Access to reliable and accurate information can help solve important practical problems related to flood risk reduction strategies, and is at the core of the EU Floods Directive. As such, the book offers a valuable resource for scientists, educators and practitioners involved in water management, natural disaster reduction and adaptation to climate change.
Large-Scale Simulation: Models, Algorithms, and Applications gives you firsthand insight on the latest advances in large-scale simulation techniques. Most of the research results are drawn from the authors’ papers in top-tier, peer-reviewed, scientific conference proceedings and journals. The first part of the book presents the fundamentals of large-scale simulation, including high-level architecture and runtime infrastructure. The second part covers middleware and software architecture for large-scale simulations, such as decoupled federate architecture, fault tolerant mechanisms, grid-enabled simulation, and federation communities. In the third part, the authors explore mechanisms—such as simulation cloning methods and algorithms—that support quick evaluation of alternative scenarios. The final part describes how distributed computing technologies and many-core architecture are used to study social phenomena. Reflecting the latest research in the field, this book guides you in using and further researching advanced models and algorithms for large-scale distributed simulation. These simulation tools will help you gain insight into large-scale systems across many disciplines.
Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Water Resources Monograph Series, Volume 18. Landslides are a constant in shaping our landscape. Whether by large episodic, or smaller chronic, mass movements, our mountains, hills, valleys, rivers, and streams bear evidence of change from landslides. Combined with anthropogenic factors, especially the development and settlement of unstable terrain, landslides (as natural processes) have become natural disasters. This book charts our understanding of landslide processes, prediction methods, and related land use issues. How and where do landslides initiate? What are the human and economic consequences? What hazard assessment and prediction methods are available, and how well do they work? How does land use, from timber harvesting and road building to urban and industrial development, affect landslide distribution in time and space? And what is the effect of land use and climate change on landslides? This book responds to such questions with: • Synopses of how various land uses and management activities influence landslide behavior • Analyses of earth surface processes that affect landslide frequency and extent • Examples of prediction techniques and methods of landslide hazard assessment, including scales of application • Discussion of landslide types and related costs and damages Those who study landslides, and those who deal with landslides, from onset to after-effects—including researchers, engineers, land managers, educators, students, and policy makers—will find this work a benchmark reference, now and for years to come.
Overland flow modelling has been an active field of research for some years, but developments in numerical methods and computational resources have recently accelerated progress, producing models for different geometries and types of flows, such as simulations of canal and river networks. Flow in canals has traditionally been described using one-dimensional, depth-averaged, shallow water models; but a variety of simulation techniques now facilitate the management of hydrodynamic systems, providing models which incorporate complex geometry and diverse flows. Much effort has gone into elaborating canal operational rules based on decision support systems, with the dual aim of assuring water delivery and meeting flow control constraints. In natural water courses, water management problems are associated with the need to meet quality standards. Numerical modelling of advection-diffusion can be used to manage problems related to the movement of solutes in rivers and aquifers. The analysis of solute transport is used to safeguard the quality of surface and ground water and to help prevent eutrophication. Solute flow through the soil can be dynamically linked to overland flow for hydrological and agricultural applications. Advances in modelling also cast new light on sediment transport in rivers, exploring the complex dynamics of river bed erosion and deposition and assist in thee analysis of river-reservoir systems. All these issues are discussed in Numerical Modelling of Hydrodynamics for Water Resources, which will be useful to civil engineers, applied mathematicians, hydrologists, and physicists.
Fluvial Hydraulics provides a sound qualitative and quantitative understanding of water and sediment flows in natural rivers. This understanding is essential for modeling and predicting hydrologic and geomorphologic processes, erosion, sediment transport, water supply and quality, habitat management, and flood hazards. This book's coverage bridges the gap between the highly quantitative mechanics-based civil-engineering approach to stream hydraulics and the more qualitative treatments of fluvial geomorphology typical of earth-sciences and natural-resources curricula. Measurements of natural river flows illustrate many central concepts. The book is specifically designed for upper-level students and practitioners who are interested in a fundamental understanding of river behavior. An introduction to the history of fluvial hydraulics and an overview of the morphology and hydrology of rivers provides the context for the rest of the text. A thorough understanding of water properties, including turbulence, is developed via a series of simple thought experiments. The bases of the equations that are used to describe and predict river flows are systematically presented, including dimensional analysis. Subsequent chapters build logically on these foundations, covering velocity distributions, new insights to the central topic of flow resistance, the magnitudes of forces in natural river flows, the principles of conservation of energy and momentum, the prediction of water-surface profiles, the principles of flow measurement, mechanics, and geomorphic aspects of sediment transport. The book will be especially valuable in providing a scientific basis for the growing field of river restoration. An appendix reviews dimenstions, units, and numerical precision. Over 250 references are cited, providing an entree to the extensive multi-disciplinary literature on rivers. The book's website provides suggestions for student exercises and makes available extensive data bases of measured streamflows for student exploration.
Bringing together scholars from around the world, this collection examines many of the historical developments in making data visible through charts, graphs, thematic maps, and now interactive displays. Today, we are used to seeing data portrayed in a dizzying array of graphic forms. Virtually any quantified knowledge, from social and physical science to engineering and medicine, as well as business, government, or personal activity, has been visualized. Yet the methods of making data visible are relatively new innovations, most stemming from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century innovations that arose as a logical response to a growing desire to quantify everything-from science, economics, and industry to population, health, and crime. Innovators such as Playfair, Alexander von Humboldt, Heinrich Berghaus, John Snow, Florence Nightingale, Francis Galton, and Charles Minard began to develop graphical methods to make data and their relations more visible. In the twentieth century, data design became both increasingly specialized within new and existing disciplines-science, engineering, social science, and medicine-and at the same time became further democratized, with new forms that make statistical, business, and government data more accessible to the public. At the close of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first, an explosion in interactive digital data design has exponentially increased our access to data. The contributors analyze this fascinating history through a variety of critical approaches, including visual rhetoric, visual culture, genre theory, and fully contextualized historical scholarship.

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