Download Free Mineral Admixtures In Cement And Concrete Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Mineral Admixtures In Cement And Concrete and write the review.

Written to meet the requirements of engineers working in construction and concrete manufacturing, Mineral Admixtures in Cement and Concrete focuses on how to make more workable and durable concrete using mineral admixtures. In particular, it covers pulverized fuel ash (PFA), blast furnace slag (BFS), silica fume (SF), rice husk ash (RHA), and metakaolin (MK), as well as some new admixtures currently under investigation. For each mineral admixture, the book looks at manufacturing and processing, physical characteristics, chemical and mineralogical composition, quality control, and reported experiences. It also examines the provisions of national standards on the admixture’s addition to cement and concrete. References to microstructures and chemistry are kept to a minimum and only discussed to the extent necessary to help readers apply the admixtures in practice. The book also addresses hydration, presenting the relevant chemistry and detailing the impact of adding mineral admixtures to concrete. A chapter on strength and durability explains the mechanisms, models, and standards related to concrete deterioration and how to mitigate carbonation, alkali-aggregate reactions, chloride attack and corrosion of reinforcement, external and internal sulphate attack, decalcification, and freeze-thaw action. This book is a useful reference for practicing engineers and students alike. It brings together, in one volume, information on the materials, hydration, and the strength and durability of cement and concrete with mineral admixtures. Offering a deeper understanding of mineral admixtures, it encourages engineers to more effectively use these and other wastes in cement and concrete to support more sustainable growth of the cement and construction industry.
Supplementary cementing materials and other mineral admixtures are being used in increasing amounts in both cement and concrete. Their main technical benefits are that they enhance the workability of fresh concrete and the durability of hardened concrete. Indeed, they affect almost every property of the concrete. Their economic and ecological benefits may be just as significant, and their use can be expected to increase as concrete remains the most common construction material. Cement and Concrete Mineral Admixtures concentrates mostly on natural pozzolans, fly ashes, ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume and limestone powder, namely the most commonly used mineral admixtures. Others such as metakaolin, rice husk ash, expanded clays and shales are also discussed. Their chemical, mineralogical, and physical properties are outlined. The influence of mineral admixtures on the hydration of cementitious systems, and the properties of fresh and hardened concrete in which they are used are emphasized. International standards are reviewed. The basics of concrete mix proportioning with mineral admixtures are outlined. The possibilities of using mineral admixtures as constituents of special concretes such as self-compacting, reactive powder, roller-compacted concretes and special non-portland, low-cost, low-energy and/or low-CO2 cements such as alinite, calcium sulfoaluminate, and belitic cements and alkali-activated binders are also covered. The book is a comprehensive reference for senior undergraduate and graduate students and researchers in the fields of cement and concrete, and for cement and concrete practitioners.
Since the publication of the first edition ten years ago, significant developments have occurred in the use of admixtures in concrete. Eight new chapters and a full update of the preceding ten chapters bring this book up to date; reflecting the relative advances made in the science and technology of different groups of admixtures. The increased role and development of admixtures in concrete technology is evidenced by a number of conferences, publications, and novel admixtures available in the market place. These developments in the field caused the modification of many chapters in the first edition in order to reflect the advances. Although individual chapters refer to standards and specifications of admixtures, those only interested in the standards or techniques used in investigating admixtures will find the second chapter (Research Technologies, Standards, and Specifications) useful. Admixtures are not as inert as may be presumed. They may chemically interact with the constituents of concrete and affect the properties of the fresh and hardened concrete and its durability. The third chapter deals with these aspects. It was important to devote a chapter to recent attempts in developing new admixtures.

Best Books