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To what extent have political decision-making processes become mediatized? Based on this question, the author analyzes media coverage and parliamentary actors' (MPs) strategies and perceptions in three conflicted decision-making processes in Switzerland. Mediatization of politics refers to behavioral changes and adaptations of political actors, institutions, and processes that are related to (mass) media. According to some scholars, mediatization may lead to politics of immediacy, conflict, drama, and personalization, thereby challenging established institutions and processes in liberal democracies. The quantitative and qualitative analyses of MPs' strategies and perceptions provide new insights into how political actors may "self-mediatizeÂ?? in the advent of globalization and polarization. Overall, the book adopts an actor-centric approach and shows that mediatization of politics is not a fate, but a strategic choice.
This book explores the extent and circumstances under which the media affects public policy; and whether the political impact of the media is confined to the public representation of politics or whether their influence goes further to also affect the substance of political decisions.
The mass media are playing an increasingly central role in modern political life that expands beyond their traditional function as mediators between the world of politics and the citizens. This volume explores the extent and circumstances under which the media affects public policy; whether the political impact of the media is confined to the public representation of politics or whether their influence goes further to also affect the substance of political decisions. It provides an in-depth understanding of the conditions under which the media might, or might not, play a role in the policy process and what the nature of their influence is. Bringing together conceptual and methodological approaches from both political science and communications studies, this book presents an interdisciplinary perspective. It presents empirical evidence of the processes involved in the interaction between mass communication and policy and features case studies from Western Europe and the US and across different policy fields. The book will be of interest to students of public policy, political communication and comparative politics.
This book is about how individuals make political decisions and form impressions of politicians and policies, with a strong emphasis on the role of the mass media in those processes.
No longer preoccupied with the East-West divide, contemporary foreign policymakers now have to confront regional conflicts, peace-enforcing and humanitarian missions, and a host of other global problems and issues in areas such as trade, health, and the environment. During the Cold War a widely-shared consensus on national interest and security in the United States and western Europe affected news reporting, public opinion, and foreign policy. But with the end of this Cold War frame of reference, foreign policy making has changed. As we enter the new century, the question is how and to what extent will the new realities of the post-Cold War world_as well as advances in communication technology_influence news reporting, public attitudes, and, most of all, foreign policy decisions on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. In this volume, American and European scholars examine change and continuity in these important aspects of the foreign policy process at the beginning of the 21st century.
Why is citizens' support for political actors and institutions declining? Recent research suggests that voter cynicism is fueled by the manner in which mass media covers political events and issues. This dissertation provides evidence regarding the impact that media coverage of political decision-making procedures has on an audience's political support. It focuses on the role of individual expectations and preferences of the audience. Empirically-standardized online surveys, an experimental study, and a comprehensive content analysis of news coverage were conducted for this study. It shows that mass media may contribute to a decrease of political support by shaping the perception of political processes. In addition, the findings suggest that the media's impact on political support was particularly strong if media coverage shapes the impression that political processes do not match individual preferences. This book contributes to a differentiation of the rather general claim that negative or critical media information results in a decline of political support. Dissertation.
This book looks at the rapid expansion of professional public relations and discusses its effects on the mass media and political process.

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