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Mathematical craftwork has become extremely popular, and mathematicians and crafters alike are fascinated by the relationship between their crafts. The focus of this book, written for mathematicians, needleworkers, and teachers of mathematics, is on the relationship between mathematics and the fiber arts (including knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch, and quilting). Each chapter starts with an overview of the mathematics and the needlework at a level understandable to both mathematicians and needleworkers, followed by more technical sections discussing the mathematics, how to introduce the mathematics in the classroom through needlework, and how to make the needlework project, including patterns and instructions.
Mathematical craftwork has become extremely popular, and mathematicians and crafters alike are fascinated by the relationship between their crafts. The focus of this book, written for mathematicians, needleworkers, and teachers of mathematics, is on the relationship between mathematics and the fiber arts (including knitting, crocheting, tatting, and quilting). Each chapter starts with an overview of the mathematics and the needlework at a level understandable to both mathematicians and needleworkers, followed by more technical sections discussing the mathematics, how to introduce the mathematics in the classroom through needlework, and how to make the needlework project, including patterns and instructions.
From the editors of the popular Making Mathematics with Needlework, this book presents projects that highlight the relationship between types of needlework and mathematics. Chapters start with accessible overviews presenting the interplay between mathematical concepts and craft expressions. Following sections explain the mathematics in more detail, and provide suggestions for classroom activities. Each chapter ends with specific crafting instructions. Types of needlework included are knitting, crochet, needlepoint, cross-stitch, quilting, temari balls, beading, tatting, and string art. Instructions are written as ordinary patterns, so the formatting and language will be familiar to crafters.
This richly illustrated book discusses non-Euclidean geometry and the hyperbolic plane in an accessible way. The author provides instructions for how to crochet models of the hyperbolic plane, pseudosphere, and catenoid/helicoids. With this knowledge, the reader has a hands-on tool for learning the properties of the hyperbolic plane and negative curvature. The author also explores geometry and its historical connections with art, architecture, navigation, and motion, as well as the history of crochet, which provides a context for the significance of a physical model of a mathematical concept that has plagued mathematicians for centuries.
Containing exercises and materials that engage students at all levels, Discrete Mathematics with Ducks presents a gentle introduction for students who find the proofs and abstractions of mathematics challenging. This classroom-tested text uses discrete mathematics as the context for introducing proofwriting. Facilitating effective and active learning, each chapter contains a mixture of discovery activities, expository text, in-class exercises, and homework problems. Elementary exercises at the end of each expository section prompt students to review the material Try This! sections encourage students to construct fundamental components of the concepts, theorems, and proofs discussed. Sets of discovery problems and illustrative examples reinforce learning. Bonus sections can be used for take-home exams, projects, or further study Instructor Notes sections offer suggestions on how to use the material in each chapter Discrete Mathematics with Ducks offers students a diverse introduction to the field and a solid foundation for further study in discrete mathematics and complies with SIGCSE guidelines. The book shows how combinatorics and graph theory are used in both computer science and mathematics.
A sweet collection of unique paper-pieced quilt blocks. Sewing since the age of six and a quilter for many years, author Penny Layman is inspired by everyday household items that connote cozy kitchens and domestic warmth. Here Penny creates 40 paper-pieced quilt blocks celebrating the home and all things in it, while showcasing her quirky sense of humor. Paper piecing allows for incredibly precise blocks, even if the quilt block designs themselves seem complex or make use of irregular shapes. The blocks in this collection include a mix of solids and prints, using the latter with particular effect. In addition to paper piecing, some blocks include needle-turned appliqué, printing, and hand embroidery. The 10 quilt projects each feature one or more blocks. In addition to complete written instructions for every block and project, the book includes a CD that contains full-size pattern templates for every block.
Many in the mathematics community in the U.S. are involved in mathematics education in various capacities. This book highlights the breadth of the work in K-16 mathematics education done by members of US departments of mathematical sciences. It contains contributions by mathematicians and mathematics educators who do work in areas such as teacher education, quantitative literacy, informal education, writing and communication, social justice, outreach and mentoring, tactile learning, art and mathematics, ethnomathematics, scholarship of teaching and learning, and mathematics education research. Contributors describe their work, its impact, and how it is perceived and valued. In addition, there is a chapter, co-authored by two mathematicians who have become administrators, on the challenges of supporting, evaluating, and rewarding work in mathematics education in departments of mathematical sciences. This book is intended to inform the readership of the breadth of the work and to encourage discussion of its value in the mathematical community. The writing is expository, not technical, and should be accessible and informative to a diverse audience. The primary readership includes all those in departments of mathematical sciences in two or four year colleges and universities, and their administrators, as well as graduate students. Researchers in education may also find topics of interest. Other potential readers include those doing work in mathematics education in schools of education, and teachers of secondary or middle school mathematics as well as those involved in their professional development.

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