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Caught on the front lines of the Great War and torn by feuding families, the French village of Briecort is rocked by fear, suspicion, and blame. As the tale unfolds, the chaste and tender love of an adopted villager and a Belgian refugee shines brightly against a dark backdrop of pride, vanity and greed.
The year is 1915, and the world is convulsing. Though the Confederacy has defeated its northern enemy twice, this time the United States has allied with the Kaiser. In the South, the freed slaves, fueled by Marxist rhetoric and the bitterness of a racist nation, take up the weapons of the Red rebellion. Despite these advantages, the United States remains pinned between Canada and the Confederate States of America, so the bloody conflict continues and grows. Both presidents--Theodore Roosevelt of the Union and staunch Confederate Woodrow Wilson--are stubbornly determined to lead their nations to victory, at any cost. . . From the Paperback edition.
This detailed case study of a part of London seeks to show how both the survivors and the bereaved sought to come to terms with the losses and implications of the Great War.
Doctors tell Raj that his son Emret won't survive his illness. As Raj struggles to prepare himself and Emret for the inevitable, he is confronted by Moslin, his son's nurse, who is been filling Emret's head with fairytales about heroic quests and powerful disease curing miracles. Emret now thinks that all he has to do is find the mythical Red Tree from the nurses stories, and he will live. In an attempt to protect his son from further emotional damage, Raj asks Moslin to stay away from Emret. He returns hours later to find them both missing. He searches the fairytales for clues to where they may have gone and stumbles upon stories that, strangely, he already knows. He saw them in a vision just before his son disappeared.
In Brussels at the height of WWI, a small, underground newspaper is the only thing offering the occupied city hopeā€”and real news of the war. The paper may be a small whisper amid the shouts of the German army, but Edward Kirkland will do anything to keep it in print. Meanwhile, Isa Lassone, a Belgian-American socialite whose parents whisked her to safety at the start of the war, sneaks back into the country to rescue those dearest to her: Edward and his mother. But Edward refuses to go, and soon Isa is drawn into his secret life printing the newspaper . . . And into his heart.
The Palestine Campaign undertaken by the British during the Great War has become one of the most glorified military offensives of the 20th Century. Shattering the reach of Ottoman imperial power for the final time, the conflict both pushed Germany back into Europe and laid the groundwork for splitting up the Middle East into the nations that we recognize today. Meanwhile, the secretive Sykes-Picot Agreement ensured the British and French would continue to exert colonial influence in the Middle East for the next sixty years. Palestine and World War I is a new exploration of the social and cultural history of the campaign, which seeks to unravel the combination of myths and memory from which we inherit the romantic desert persona of Lawrence of Arabia and the image of General Allenby symbolically entering the Holy City on foot. With a compelling Foreword by Jay Winter, Palestine and World War I augments our existing understanding of the origins of contemporary conflict in the Middle East and provides a valuable new perspective into the ongoing tensions within the Arab World.
The overriding image of the First World War is the bloody stalemate of the Western Front, but although much of the action did occur on land, the overall shape of the war _ even the inevitability of British participation _ arose out of its maritime character. It was essentially a struggle about access to worldwide resources, most clearly seen in the desperate German attempts to deal with the American industrial threat, which ultimately levered the United States into the war, and thus a consequence of British sea control.rn This radical new book concentrates on the way in which each side tried to use or deny the sea to the other, and in so doing it describes rapid wartime changes not only in ship and weapon technology but also in the way naval warfare was envisaged and fought. Combat produced many surprises: some, like the impact of the mine and torpedo, are familiar, but this book also brings to light many previously unexplored subjects, like creative new tactical practices and improved command and control.rn The contrast between expectation and reality had enormous consequences not only for the course of the war but also for the way navies developed afterwards. This book melds strategic, technical, and tactical aspects to reveal the First World War from a fresh perspective, but also demonstrates how its perceived lessons dominated the way navies prepared for the Second.

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