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Caught on the front lines of the Great War and torn by feuding families, the French village of Briecort is rocked by fear, suspicion, and blame. As the tale unfolds, the chaste and tender love of an adopted villager and a Belgian refugee shines brightly against a dark backdrop of pride, vanity and greed.
Known as the "Great War," World War One was one of history's greatest tragedies. It eventually dragged most of Europe and the world into its bloody quagmire, inflicting more than four years of suffering, misery, maiming, and death on the belligerent nations. Ideal for undergraduate and graduate courses, A History of the Great War: World War One and the International Crisis of the Early Twentieth Century is a brief yet comprehensive study that distinguishes itself from other textbooks in significant ways. Providing broader coverage than most texts, it discusses the phenomenon of the war in its chronological entirety. Author Eric Dorn Brose analyzes the forces that generated international tension and made wars more prevalent before 1914; the causes and course of the Great War to 1918; and the violent and problematic aftermath of the struggle to 1926. Rather than focusing exclusively on military developments, Brose also examines the war's underlying causes, its political and diplomatic dimensions, and its myriad consequences. Explicitly global in scope, A History of the Great War offers a more extensive look at the worldwide side of the Great War than existing texts do, including coverage of the campaigns spanning Northeast Africa, Palestine, Mesopotamia, Central Asia, India, and the war at sea. In addition, the author incorporates and discusses recent groundbreaking research in the "Notes" section of each chapter, so that students can easily access it. The text is also enhanced by maps, photos, and an engaging vignette at the opening of each chapter that serves as an introduction.
The German invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941, began a war that lasted nearly four years and created by far the bloodiest theater in World War II. In the conventional narrative of this war, Hitler was defeated by Stalin because, like Napoleon, he underestimated the size and resources of his enemy. In fact, says historian John Mosier, Hitler came very close to winning and lost only because of the intervention of the western Allies. Stalin’s great triumph was not winning the war, but establishing the prevailing interpretation of the war. The Great Patriotic War, as it is known in Russia, would eventually prove fatal, setting in motion events that would culminate in the collapse of the Soviet Union. Deathride argues that the Soviet losses in World War II were unsustainable and would eventually have led to defeat. The Soviet Union had only twice the population of Germany at the time, but it was suffering a casualty rate more than two and a half times the German rate. Because Stalin had a notorious habit of imprisoning or killing anyone who brought him bad news (and often their families as well), Soviet battlefield reports were fantasies, and the battle plans Soviet generals developed seldom responded to actual circumstances. In this respect the Soviets waged war as they did everything else: through propaganda rather than actual achievement. What saved Stalin was the Allied decision to open the Mediterranean theater. Once the Allies threatened Italy, Hitler was forced to withdraw his best troops from the eastern front and redeploy them. In addition, the Allies provided heavy vehicles that the Soviets desperately needed and were unable to manufacture themselves. It was not the resources of the Soviet Union that defeated Hitler but the resources of the West. In this provocative revisionist analysis of the war between Hitler and Stalin, Mosier provides a dramatic, vigorous narrative of events as he shows how most previous histories accepted Stalin’s lies and distortions to produce a false sense of Soviet triumph. Deathride is the real story of the Eastern Front, fresh and different from what we thought we knew.
Two dozen elves set out from Leklorall, the capital of East Reach. After an ambush at sea only a handful survived, of those only two reached the far shores of the great sea. Their names were Seth and Galan and they sided with Great Kingdom during the Battle of Quashan', helping to defend the valley city with skills and speeds no living man had ever seen before. But success on the battlefield could not undo the past. Elves and men are mortal enemies, as it has been since the Great War when the elves of Under-Earth sought to enslave all the peoples of Ruin Mist. Now even as Seth attempts to sway Great Kingdom's leaders to stop the coming darkness, there are few who will truly listen--and even fewer who can look beyond the treachery of days past.
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A detailed account of the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge providing background on its engineering history as well as the political and social climate of the late-nineteenth century. Reissue. 10,000 first printing.

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