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Oppaymolleah's curse. General Braddock's buried gold. The Original Man of Steel, Joe Magarac. Such legends have found a home among the rich folklore of Western Pennsylvania. Thomas White spins a beguiling yarn with tales that reach from the misty hollows of the Alleghenies to the lost islands of Pittsburgh. White invites readers to learn the truth behind the urban legend of the Green Man, speculate on the conspiracy surrounding the lost B-25 bomber of Monongahela and shiver over the ghostly lore of Western Pennsylvania.
An easy-to-use guide to American regional folklore with advice on conducting research, regional essays, and a selective annotated bibliography. * Fully annotated bibliographies on the folklore of each of eight regions of the United States * Engaging overview essays by folklore scholars introduce each of the U.S. regions covered * A list of literary authors who incorporate folklore themes in their writings, together with a brief list of some of their major works * A list of folklore-related museums, with addresses and phone numbers, a list of folklore journals, and, when possible, a list of websites
Ghostly travelers are said to wander the lonely roads of western Pennsylvania. A creeping fog rises from Blue Mist Road, and stories of car crashes, lynchings and even strange beasts haunt this isolated stretch outside Pittsburgh. Is it the angry spirit of a jealous husband or a gypsy king who stalks Erie County's Axe Murder Hollow? Shades of Death Road in Washington County may be host to phantom coal miners killed during a deadly labor dispute. With firsthand accounts and historical research, authors Thomas White and Tony Lavorgne travel the backcountry roads and byways of western Pennsylvania to discover their ghost tales and mysterious legends.
Ghostly travelers are said to wander the lonely roads of western Pennsylvania. A creeping fog rises from Blue Mist Road, and stories of car crashes, lynchings and even strange beasts haunt this isolated stretch outside Pittsburgh. Is it the angry spirit of a jealous husband or a gypsy king who stalks Erie County's Axe Murder Hollow? Shades of Death Road in Washington County may be host to phantom coal miners killed during a deadly labor dispute. With firsthand accounts and historical research, authors Thomas White and Tony Lavorgne travel the backcountry roads and byways of western Pennsylvania to discover their ghost tales and mysterious legends.
Powwow practitioners of York County, the headless ghost of a murdered girl that roams the back roads of Schuylkill County and the Hummelstown Hermit who still lingers in Indian Echo Caverns--these tales are all part of the lore of South Central Pennsylvania. Such legends offer a fuller history of the region, from the folkways of the Pennsylvania Dutch to the stories of the rocky relations between German and English settlers and local tribes. Folklorist David J. Puglia reveals this lore to a new audience and explores the region's more recent legends like the "Wizard of Cumberland County" and Milton Hershey's narrow miss with the Titanic. Join Puglia as he tracks through the hills, houses and hollows of South Central Pennsylvania in search of its legends and lore.
A fascinating survey of the entire history of tall tales, folklore, and mythology in the United States from earliest times to the present, including stories and myths from the modern era that have become an essential part of contemporary popular culture. • Presents a compelling mix of some 500 entries drawn from traditional Native American and European American culture as well as Mexican American, African American, Chinese American, and other national traditions • Includes numerous primary documents that help readers to pinpoint and understand the origins of different myths and legends as well as how they evolve over time • Features a wide variety of entries drawn from newer traditions of science fiction, urban legends, and conspiracy theories • Supplies bibliographic references with each entry that include websites for further reading and research
Like the region's first inhabitants, the 'Cat People,' who made clothing from the mountain lions and panthers that they hunted, Western New Yorkers still savor the tradition of storytelling. Tales such as the 'Mail-Riding Mamma' of Chautauqua County, who carried both the post and her infant child above her head as she journeyed across perilously flooded creeks, and the Ossian Giant, who at age nineteen stood seven feet, six inches tall and weighed 385 pounds, are vividly narrated by Buffalo storyteller Lorna MacDonald Czarnota. Listen to the whispered legends of spirits, heroes and traitors hidden in one of New York's most captivating regions.

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