Download Free Leaving Independence Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Leaving Independence and write the review.

Abigail Baldwyn might not be a widow after all.... Ever since she received word that her husband, Robert, was killed in the Civil War, Abigail has struggled to keep her Tennessee home and family together. Then a letter arrives claiming that Robert isn't dead, yet he has no plans to return. Desperate for answers, Abigail travels to Independence, Missouri, where she joins a westbound wagon train to find him. Leading a company along the Oregon Trail isn't part of Hoke Mathews's plans. But then the former cavalry scout gets a glimpse of Abigail--so elegant compared to the rest of their hardscrabble wagon community, yet spirited and resilient. Through every peril they encounter--snakebites, Indian raids, fevers, dangerous grudges--his bond with Abigail grows. Abigail knew this journey would test her courage. Now it's testing her marriage vows and her heart, daring her to claim a future on her own terms in a land rich with promise.
This book, written by Clare Holdsworth and David Morgan, looks at the socially significant event of leaving the parental home.
A rising-star historian offers a significant new global perspective on the Revolutionary War with the story of the conflict as seen through the eyes of the outsiders of colonial society Winner of the Journal of the American Revolution Book of the Year Award • Winner of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey History Prize • Finalist for the George Washington Book Prize Over the last decade, award-winning historian Kathleen DuVal has revitalized the study of early America’s marginalized voices. Now, in Independence Lost, she recounts an untold story as rich and significant as that of the Founding Fathers: the history of the Revolutionary Era as experienced by slaves, American Indians, women, and British loyalists living on Florida’s Gulf Coast. While citizens of the thirteen rebelling colonies came to blows with the British Empire over tariffs and parliamentary representation, the situation on the rest of the continent was even more fraught. In the Gulf of Mexico, Spanish forces clashed with Britain’s strained army to carve up the Gulf Coast, as both sides competed for allegiances with the powerful Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek nations who inhabited the region. Meanwhile, African American slaves had little control over their own lives, but some individuals found opportunities to expand their freedoms during the war. Independence Lost reveals that individual motives counted as much as the ideals of liberty and freedom the Founders espoused: Independence had a personal as well as national meaning, and the choices made by people living outside the colonies were of critical importance to the war’s outcome. DuVal introduces us to the Mobile slave Petit Jean, who organized militias to fight the British at sea; the Chickasaw diplomat Payamataha, who worked to keep his people out of war; New Orleans merchant Oliver Pollock and his wife, Margaret O’Brien Pollock, who risked their own wealth to organize funds and garner Spanish support for the American Revolution; the half-Scottish-Creek leader Alexander McGillivray, who fought to protect indigenous interests from European imperial encroachment; the Cajun refugee Amand Broussard, who spent a lifetime in conflict with the British; and Scottish loyalists James and Isabella Bruce, whose work on behalf of the British Empire placed them in grave danger. Their lives illuminate the fateful events that took place along the Gulf of Mexico and, in the process, changed the history of North America itself. Adding new depth and moral complexity, Kathleen DuVal reinvigorates the story of the American Revolution. Independence Lost is a bold work that fully establishes the reputation of a historian who is already regarded as one of her generation’s best. Praise for Independence Lost “[An] astonishing story . . . Independence Lost will knock your socks off. To read [this book] is to see that the task of recovering the entire American Revolution has barely begun.”—The New York Times Book Review “A richly documented and compelling account.”—The Wall Street Journal “A remarkable, necessary—and entirely new—book about the American Revolution.”—The Daily Beast “A completely new take on the American Revolution, rife with pathos, double-dealing, and intrigue.”—Elizabeth A. Fenn, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Encounters at the Heart of the World From the Hardcover edition.
Even after leaving presidential office at a time when America was in its ascendance to global power, Harry Truman would call Independence, Missouri, the "center of the world." It was already a town rich in the history of westward exploration and spiritual pilgrimage before he began sixty-four years of residence there, but the way it shaped Truman and was, in turn, shaped by him has defined Independence's legacy. That defining relationship is explored here by Truman expert Jon Taylor as it never has been before.
Independence follows the journey of a young woman named Sonora Parish in the late 1800’s, as she struggles to find a new life for herself after being disgraced by her father’s criminal activity. When her father’s sins find her, she disappears to Wyoming, finding a job as a housekeeper on a ranch named Independence. Her journey takes her through love and enduring friendship, heartache and betrayal, and a fight for survival. Throughout, Sonora must decide if her past will define her, or if she will fight to keep the life she has built for herself at Independence.
Traditionally, children have lived in their parents' homes until they were married and ready to start their own families. Leaving Home before Marriage explores a step that young American adults are increasingly taking--setting up a household alone or with housemates. Frances K. Goldscheider and Calvin Goldscheider analyze this profound change as it figures in the plans of young people and their parents and in the decisions they eventually make about their living arrangements. The Goldscheiders find that gender attitudes, ethnic and religious values, and generational relationships shape the path young people take to residential independence.

Best Books