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Margaret Lynch-Brennan tells the real story of Irish domestic servants, often in their own words, providing a richly detailed portrait of their lives and experiences.
The theme of this book is cultural encounter and exchange in Irish women's lives. Using three case studies: the Enlightenment, emigration and modernism, it analyses reading and popular and consumer culture as sites of negotiation of gender roles. It traces how the circulation of ideas, fantasies and aspirations which have shaped women's lives in actuality and in imagination and argues that there were many different ways of being a woman. Attention to women's cultural consumption and production shows that one individual may in one day identify with representations of heroines of romantic fiction, patriots, philanthropists, literary ladies, film stars, career women, popular singers, advertising models and foreign missionaries. The processes of cultural consumption, production and exchange provide evidence of women's agency, aspirations and activities within and far beyond the domestic sphere.
This volume of Memory Ireland focuses on the impact of the Famine and the Troubles on the formation and study of Irish cultural memory.
This book provides a much-needed historiographical overview of modern Irish History, which is often written mainly from a socio-political perspective. This guide offers a comprehensive account of Irish History in its manifold aspects such as family, famine, labour, institutional, women, cultural, art, identity and migration histories.
Over seven million men, women and children left Ireland over the course of the nineteenth century. This book is the first to put that huge population loss in its religious context, by asking how the Irish Catholic, Anglican and Presbyterian churches responded to mass emigration. Did they facilitate it, object to it, or limit it? Were the three Irish churches themselves changed by this demographic upheaval? Comprising a fresh focus on the effects of emigration on Ireland rather than its diaspora, and merging two of the most important phenomena in the story of modern Ireland - mass emigration and religious change - this study offers new insights for both nineteenth-century Irish history and historical migration studies in general. The book explores in turn the churches' social and economic thought in relation to emigration, the practical involvement of clergy in departures, the missionary endeavours of each church as they related to emigrants, the key role that emigration played in intensifying sectarian rivalry at home and the place of emigrants in the churches' 'imperial' ambitions. Based on a large body of previously unused and underexploited archival and printed sources from all over Ireland and beyond, and employing the analytical techniques of, variously, economic, religious and cultural historians, the book examines the extent to which the churches were able to influence emigration and the extent to which their development was itself influenced by it. It concludes that, on balance, emigration determined the churches' fates to a far greater extent than the churches determined emigrants' fates.
Women, Press, and Politics explores the literary and historical significance of women writing for the most influential body of nationalist journalism during the Irish revival, the advanced nationalist press. This work studies women’s writings in the Irish national tradition, focusing in particular on leading feminine voices in the cultural and political movements that helped launch the Eater Rising of 1916: Augusta Gregory, Alice Milligan, Maud Gonne, Constance Markievicz, Delia Larkin, Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, and Louie Bennett. Karen Steele argues that by examining the innovative work of these writers from the perspective of women’s artistry and women’s political investments, we can best appreciate the expansive range of their cultural productions and the influence these had on other nationalists, who went on to shape Irish politics and culture in the decades to come.

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