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Clear, concise explanation of logical development of basic crystallographic concepts. Topics include crystals and lattices, symmetry, x-ray diffraction, and more. Problems, with answers. 114 illustrations. 1969 edition.
Informal, effective undergraduate-level text introduces vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, presenting applications of group theory to the interpretation of UV, visible, and infrared spectra without assuming a high level of background knowledge. 200 problems with solutions. Numerous illustrations. "A uniform and consistent treatment of the subject matter." — Journal of Chemical Education.
Intended for first- and second-year undergraduates, this introduction to solid-state chemistry includes practical examples of applications and modern developments to offer students the opportunity to apply their knowledge in real-life situations. It aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the traditional knowledge of crystal structures: lattices, unit cells, close packing, and octahedral and tetrahedral holes and their occupation by various ions in the well-known crystal structures. This descriptive work is augmented by free-electron and band theory. Links to other branches of chemistry and practical examples are emphasized, as are the links back to band theory and crystal structures. For this second edition, the book has been updated throughout and has two new chapters, one on X-ray diffraction techniques and another on solid-state preparative methods, as well as new sections on symmetry and ferroelectrics.
X-ray diffraction crystallography for powder samples is a well-established and widely used method. It is applied to materials characterization to reveal the atomic scale structure of various substances in a variety of states. The book deals with fundamental properties of X-rays, geometry analysis of crystals, X-ray scattering and diffraction in polycrystalline samples and its application to the determination of the crystal structure. The reciprocal lattice and integrated diffraction intensity from crystals and symmetry analysis of crystals are explained. To learn the method of X-ray diffraction crystallography well and to be able to cope with the given subject, a certain number of exercises is presented in the book to calculate specific values for typical examples. This is particularly important for beginners in X-ray diffraction crystallography. One aim of this book is to offer guidance to solving the problems of 90 typical substances. For further convenience, 100 supplementary exercises are also provided with solutions. Some essential points with basic equations are summarized in each chapter, together with some relevant physical constants and the atomic scattering factors of the elements.
Crystallography Made Crystal Clear makes crystallography accessible to readers who have no prior knowledge of the field or its mathematical basis. This is the most comprehensive and concise reference for beginning Macromolecular crystallographers, written by a leading expert in the field. Rhodes' uses visual and geometric models to help readers understand the mathematics that form the basis of x-ray crystallography. He has invested a great deal of time and effort on World Wide Web tools for users of models, including beginning-level tutorials in molecular modeling on personal computers. Rhodes' personal CMCC Home Page also provides access to tools and links to resources discussed in the text. Most significantly, the final chapter introduces the reader to macromolecular modeling on personal computers-featuring SwissPdbViewer, a free, powerful modeling program now available for PC, Power Macintosh, and Unix computers. This updated and expanded new edition uses attractive four-color art, web tool access for further study, and concise language to explain the basis of X-ray crystallography, increasingly vital in today's research labs. * Helps readers to understand where models come from, so they don't use them blindly and inappropriately * Provides many visual and geometric models for understanding a largely mathematical method * Allows readers to judge whether recently published models are of sufficiently high quality and detail to be useful in their own work * Allows readers to study macromolecular structure independently and in an open-ended fashion on their own computers, without being limited to textbook or journals illustrations * Provides access to web tools in a format that will not go out of date. Links will be updated and added as existing resources change location or are added
First published in 1957, this classic study has been reissued in a paperback version that includes an additional chapter bringing the material up to date. The author formulates the physical properties of crystals systematically in tensor notation, presenting tensor properties in terms of their common mathematical basis and the thermodynamic relations between them. The mathematical groundwork is laid in a discussion of tensors of the first and second ranks. Tensors of higher ranks and matrix methods are then introduced as natural developments of the theory. A similar pattern is followed in discussing thermodynamic and optical aspects.

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