Download Free Insurance And The Law Of Obligations Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Insurance And The Law Of Obligations and write the review.

Filling a gap in the understanding of private law, this book identifies the ways in which private law is deeply affected by insurance, and provides a structured exploration and interpretation of the ways in which insurance influences private law. It aims to change existing opinions about the limited theoretical importance of insurance, and to equip lawyers in general with the understanding of insurance contracts that they need in order to appreciate the public andprivate role of insurance more fully.
This book provides a much-needed analysis of this very important subject for international business lawyers, including discussion of the jurisdictional and choice of laws issues arising from cross-border contracts of insurance and reinsurance concluded by electronic means. This book is the first published in England to devote itself to a detailed analysis of the choice of laws rules in the E.C. Insurance Directives. The private international law rules of the E.C. Insurance Directives deal with the applicable law to insurance contracts covering risks situated within the EU. They do not deal with the applicable law to reinsurance contracts and insurance contracts covering risks situated outside the EU. This should be ascertained by reference to the choice of laws provisions in the 1980 Rome Convention on the law applicable to contractual obligations. Detailed discussion of these rules is also provided, and proposals for reform are suggested.
The 2005 Avant-projet de réforme du droit des obligations et de la prescription, also dubbed the Avant-projet Catala, suggests the most far-reaching reform of the French Civil code since it came into force in 1804. It reviews central aspects of contract law, the law of delict and the law of unjustified enrichment. There is currently a very lively debate in France as to the merits or the demerits of both the particular draft provisions and the general idea of recodification as such. This volume is the first publication to introduce the reform proposals to an English speaking audience. It contains the official English translation of the text, and distinguished private lawyers from both England and France analyse and assess particularly interesting aspects of the substantive draft provisions in a comparative perspective. Topics covered include negotiation and renegotiation of contracts, la cause, the enforcement of contractual obligations, termination of contract and its consequences, the effects of contracts on third parties, the definition of la faute, the quantification of damages, and the law of prescription. The volume also contains an overall assessment of the draft provisions by one of the most senior French judges who chaired the Working Party on the Avant-projet, established by the French Supreme Court, the Cour de cassation. The book is indispensable for comparative private lawyers and lawyers with a particular interest in French law. It is also of use to all private lawyers (both academics and practitioners) looking for information on recent international and European trends in contract and tort.
Published with the Centre for Commercial and Property Law, QUT.This book focuses on the commercial advantage which information gives to business and the circumstances in which obligations to disclose may arise which erode that advantage. The term 'business' is used broadly to cover persons and corporations who undertake an occupation, profession or trade 'carried on in an organised way for the purpose of profit or gain'. The five parts of the book cover:disclosure obligations arising pursuant to imposed standards of conduct; disclosure of information to the government and its consequences; disclosure obligations of companies incorporated under the Corporations Law which arise under that law; and protecting and limiting disclosure of business information, particularly in the context of employment contracts and including the drafting of confidentiality clauses.
Derived from the renowned multi-volume International Encyclopaedia of Laws, this book provides valuable practical insight into both public supervisory legislation concerning insurance and private insurance contract law in the United Kingdom. An informative general introduction surveying the legal, political, financial, and commercial background and surroundings of insurance provides a sound foundation for the specific detail that follows. The book covers all essential aspects of the law and regulation governing insurance policies and instruments. Its detailed exposition includes examination of the form of the insurance company and its reserves and investments; the insurance contract; the legal aspects of the various branches of property and liability insurance; motor vehicle insurance schemes; life insurance, health insurance, and workmen's compensation schemes; reinsurance, co-insurance, and pooling; taxation of insurance; and risk management and prevention. Succint yet eminently practical, the book will be a valuable resource for lawyers handling cases affecting the United Kingdom. It will be of practical utility to those both in public service, and private practice called on to develop and to apply the laws of insurance, and of special interest as a contribution to the much-needed harmonization of insurance law.
This two-volume series offers the first detailed and systematic account of the history of private law in Scotland. Volume 2 covers topics such as insurance, negligence, liability, breach of contract, unfair contract terms, sale, and defamation.
This book challenges certain differences between contract, tort and equity in relation to the measure (in a broad sense) of damages. Damages are defined as the monetary award made by a court in consequence of a breach of contract, a tort or an equitable wrong. In all these causes of action, damages usually aim to put the claimant into the position the claimant would be in without the wrong. Even though the main objective of damages is thus the same for each cause of action, their measure is not. While some aspects of the measure of damages are more or less harmonised between contract, tort and equity (e.g. causation in fact and mitigation), significant differences exist in relation to (1) remoteness of damage, which is the question of whether, when and to which degree damage needs to be foreseeable to be recoverable; (2) the compensability of non-pecuniary loss such as pain and suffering, distress and loss of reputation; (3) the effect of contributory negligence, which is the victim's contribution to the occurrence of the wrong or the ensuing loss through unreasonable conduct prior to the wrong; (4) the circumstances under which victims of wrongs can claim the gain the wrongdoer has made from the wrong; and (5) the availability and scope of exemplary (or punitive) damages. For each of the five topics, this book examines the present position in contract, tort and equity and establishes the differences between the three areas. It goes on to scrutinise the arguments in defence of existing differences. The conclusion on each topic is that the present differences between contract, tort and equity cannot be justified on merits and should be removed through a harmonisation of the relevant principles.

Best Books