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Television, video games, and computers are easily accessible to twenty-first-century children, but what impact do they have on creativity and imagination? In this book, two wise and long-admired observers of children's make-believe look at the cognitive and moral potential--and concern--created by electronic media.
Presenting an argument about the long-term effects of play, this work urges researchers and practitioners to reconsider the ways play facilitates development across domains. It provides children with the opportunity to maximize their attention spans, learn to get along with peers, and cultivate their creativity.
The Handbook of Children, Culture, and Violence provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary examination of childhood violence that considers children as both consumers and perpetrators of violence, as well as victims of it. This Handbook is the first single volume to consider situations when children are responsible for violence, rather than focusing exclusively on occasions when they are victimized.
With over 500 hand-picked titles, Healing Stories recommends carefully selected books essential for any adult looking to help children cope with their growing pains through reading. Annotated with helpful commentary, these titles cover everything from kids' everyday trials (losing baby teeth, starting school, having a bad day) to more emotionally stressful events (death of a pet, moving, illness), giving adults all the information they need to choose the right books. Also features useful tips to make reading fun and helpful for both adults and children. For more information, visit the Healing Stories Web site.
At the turn of the nineteenth century, publishing houses in London, New York, Paris, Stuttgart, and Berlin produced books in ever greater numbers. But it was not just the advent of mass printing that created the era’s “bookish” culture. According to Andrew Piper, romantic writing and romantic writers played a crucial role in adjusting readers to this increasingly international and overflowing literary environment. Learning how to use and to want books occurred through more than the technological, commercial, or legal conditions that made the growing proliferation of books possible; the making of such bibliographic fantasies was importantly a product of the symbolic operations contained within books as well. Examining novels, critical editions, gift books, translations, and illustrated books, as well as the communities who made them, Dreaming in Books tells a wide-ranging story of the book’s identity at the turn of the nineteenth century. In so doing, it shows how many of the most pressing modern communicative concerns are not unique to the digital age but emerged with a particular sense of urgency during the bookish upheavals of the romantic era. In revisiting the book’s rise through the prism of romantic literature, Piper aims to revise our assumptions about romanticism, the medium of the printed book, and, ultimately, the future of the book in our so-called digital age.
Dr. Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Dr. Roberta Golinkoff, renowned authors and child development experts, offer a peek inside early childhood through the marvelous marks made by young children. Thre's much to see and celebrate in children's scribble--much more than meets the eye. What appear to random, accidentls marks are rich in meaning, both for the children creating them and for the adults who proudly display their colorful scribbles on office walls and refrigerator doors.
Pride and Joy is a different kind of parenting book. In Pride and Joy, child psychologist Kenneth Barish brings together the best of recent advances in clinical and neuroscience research with the author's three decades of experience working with children and families. He shows how a deeper appreciation of our children's emotions offers parents a new understanding of their children's development and better solutions to the problems in their lives. Barish offers advice to parents on how we can restore more joyfulness and pride in our relationships with our children and how we can help children bounce back from disappointment and defeat. He shows how we can repair family relationships that have been damaged by frequent anger and resentment and how we can preserve our children's idealism and their concern for others--how we can raise children who feel good about themselves and also care about the needs and feelings of others. Barish also offers advice on how to solve problems of daily family life--establishing rules and limits, doing homework and going to sleep, winning and losing at games, our children's reluctance to talk to us, their tantrums and lack of motivation, and their addiction to television and video games. He presents down-to-earth recommendations for solving these common family problems--problems that too often erode the joyfulness of our children and our pleasure in being parents. Pride and Joy is both informative and highly practical, and a balanced answer to the extreme methods that too often dominate parenting debates. Few parenting books address the central issues of concern to today's parents while also offering parents as much day-to-day advice.

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