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Many students have trouble the first time they take a mathematics course in which proofs play a significant role. This new edition of Velleman's successful text will prepare students to make the transition from solving problems to proving theorems by teaching them the techniques needed to read and write proofs. The book begins with the basic concepts of logic and set theory, to familiarize students with the language of mathematics and how it is interpreted. These concepts are used as the basis for a step-by-step breakdown of the most important techniques used in constructing proofs. The author shows how complex proofs are built up from these smaller steps, using detailed 'scratch work' sections to expose the machinery of proofs about the natural numbers, relations, functions, and infinite sets. To give students the opportunity to construct their own proofs, this new edition contains over 200 new exercises, selected solutions, and an introduction to Proof Designer software. No background beyond standard high school mathematics is assumed. This book will be useful to anyone interested in logic and proofs: computer scientists, philosophers, linguists, and of course mathematicians.
Many students have trouble the first time they take a mathematics course in which proofs play a significant role. This new edition of Velleman's successful text will prepare students to make the transition from solving problems to proving theorems by teaching them the techniques needed to read and write proofs. The book begins with the basic concepts of logic and set theory, to familiarize students with the language of mathematics and how it is interpreted. These concepts are used as the basis for a step-by-step breakdown of the most important techniques used in constructing proofs. The author shows how complex proofs are built up from these smaller steps, using detailed 'scratch work' sections to expose the machinery of proofs about the natural numbers, relations, functions, and infinite sets. To give students the opportunity to construct their own proofs, this new edition contains over 200 new exercises, selected solutions, and an introduction to Proof Designer software. No background beyond standard high school mathematics is assumed. This book will be useful to anyone interested in logic and proofs: computer scientists, philosophers, linguists, and of course mathematicians.
Many mathematics students have trouble the first time they take a course, such as linear algebra, abstract algebra, introductory analysis, or discrete mathematics, in which they are asked to prove various theorems. This textbook will prepare students to make the transition from solving problems to proving theorems by teaching them the techniques needed to read and write proofs. The book begins with the basic concepts of logic and set theory, to familiarize students with the language of mathematics and how it is interpreted. These concepts are used as the basis for a step-by-step breakdown of the most important techniques used in constructing proofs. The author shows how complex proofs are built up from these smaller steps, using detailed "scratchwork" sections to expose the machinery of proofs about the natural numbers, relations, functions, and infinite sets. Numerous exercises give students the opportunity to construct their own proofs. No background beyond standard high school mathematics is assumed. This book will be useful to anyone interested in logic and proofs: computer scientists, philosophers, linguists, and of course mathematicians.
This book is an introduction to the language and standard proof methods of mathematics. It is a bridge from the computational courses (such as calculus or differential equations) that students typically encounter in their first year of college to a more abstract outlook. It lays a foundation for more theoretical courses such as topology, analysis and abstract algebra. Although it may be more meaningful to the student who has had some calculus, there is really no prerequisite other than a measure of mathematical maturity.
“Proofs and Fundamentals: A First Course in Abstract Mathematics” 2nd edition is designed as a "transition" course to introduce undergraduates to the writing of rigorous mathematical proofs, and to such fundamental mathematical ideas as sets, functions, relations, and cardinality. The text serves as a bridge between computational courses such as calculus, and more theoretical, proofs-oriented courses such as linear algebra, abstract algebra and real analysis. This 3-part work carefully balances Proofs, Fundamentals, and Extras. Part 1 presents logic and basic proof techniques; Part 2 thoroughly covers fundamental material such as sets, functions and relations; and Part 3 introduces a variety of extra topics such as groups, combinatorics and sequences. A gentle, friendly style is used, in which motivation and informal discussion play a key role, and yet high standards in rigor and in writing are never compromised. New to the second edition: 1) A new section about the foundations of set theory has been added at the end of the chapter about sets. This section includes a very informal discussion of the Zermelo– Fraenkel Axioms for set theory. We do not make use of these axioms subsequently in the text, but it is valuable for any mathematician to be aware that an axiomatic basis for set theory exists. Also included in this new section is a slightly expanded discussion of the Axiom of Choice, and new discussion of Zorn's Lemma, which is used later in the text. 2) The chapter about the cardinality of sets has been rearranged and expanded. There is a new section at the start of the chapter that summarizes various properties of the set of natural numbers; these properties play important roles subsequently in the chapter. The sections on induction and recursion have been slightly expanded, and have been relocated to an earlier place in the chapter (following the new section), both because they are more concrete than the material found in the other sections of the chapter, and because ideas from the sections on induction and recursion are used in the other sections. Next comes the section on the cardinality of sets (which was originally the first section of the chapter); this section gained proofs of the Schroeder–Bernstein theorem and the Trichotomy Law for Sets, and lost most of the material about finite and countable sets, which has now been moved to a new section devoted to those two types of sets. The chapter concludes with the section on the cardinality of the number systems. 3) The chapter on the construction of the natural numbers, integers and rational numbers from the Peano Postulates was removed entirely. That material was originally included to provide the needed background about the number systems, particularly for the discussion of the cardinality of sets, but it was always somewhat out of place given the level and scope of this text. The background material about the natural numbers needed for the cardinality of sets has now been summarized in a new section at the start of that chapter, making the chapter both self-contained and more accessible than it previously was. 4) The section on families of sets has been thoroughly revised, with the focus being on families of sets in general, not necessarily thought of as indexed. 5) A new section about the convergence of sequences has been added to the chapter on selected topics. This new section, which treats a topic from real analysis, adds some diversity to the chapter, which had hitherto contained selected topics of only an algebraic or combinatorial nature. 6) A new section called ``You Are the Professor'' has been added to the end of the last chapter. This new section, which includes a number of attempted proofs taken from actual homework exercises submitted by students, offers the reader the opportunity to solidify her facility for writing proofs by critiquing these submissions as if she were the instructor for the course. 7) All known errors have been corrected. 8) Many minor adjustments of wording have been made throughout the text, with the hope of improving the exposition.
A Trusted Guide to Discrete Mathematics with Proof?Now in a Newly Revised Edition Discrete mathematics has become increasingly popular in recent years due to its growing applications in the field of computer science. Discrete Mathematics with Proof, Second Edition continues to facilitate an up-to-date understanding of this important topic, exposing readers to a wide range of modern and technological applications. The book begins with an introductory chapter that provides an accessible explanation of discrete mathematics. Subsequent chapters explore additional related topics including counting, finite probability theory, recursion, formal models in computer science, graph theory, trees, the concepts of functions, and relations. Additional features of the Second Edition include: An intense focus on the formal settings of proofs and their techniques, such as constructive proofs, proof by contradiction, and combinatorial proofs New sections on applications of elementary number theory, multidimensional induction, counting tulips, and the binomial distribution Important examples from the field of computer science presented as applications including the Halting problem, Shannon's mathematical model of information, regular expressions, XML, and Normal Forms in relational databases Numerous examples that are not often found in books on discrete mathematics including the deferred acceptance algorithm, the Boyer-Moore algorithm for pattern matching, Sierpinski curves, adaptive quadrature, the Josephus problem, and the five-color theorem Extensive appendices that outline supplemental material on analyzing claims and writing mathematics, along with solutions to selected chapter exercises Combinatorics receives a full chapter treatment that extends beyond the combinations and permutations material by delving into non-standard topics such as Latin squares, finite projective planes, balanced incomplete block designs, coding theory, partitions, occupancy problems, Stirling numbers, Ramsey numbers, and systems of distinct representatives. A related Web site features animations and visualizations of combinatorial proofs that assist readers with comprehension. In addition, approximately 500 examples and over 2,800 exercises are presented throughout the book to motivate ideas and illustrate the proofs and conclusions of theorems. Assuming only a basic background in calculus, Discrete Mathematics with Proof, Second Edition is an excellent book for mathematics and computer science courses at the undergraduate level. It is also a valuable resource for professionals in various technical fields who would like an introduction to discrete mathematics.
This is the eBook of the printed book and may not include any media, website access codes, or print supplements that may come packaged with the bound book. Mathematical Proofs: A Transition to Advanced Mathematics, Third Edition, prepares students for the more abstract mathematics courses that follow calculus. Appropriate for self-study or for use in the classroom, this text introduces students to proof techniques, analyzing proofs, and writing proofs of their own. Written in a clear, conversational style, this book provides a solid introduction to such topics as relations, functions, and cardinalities of sets, as well as the theoretical aspects of fields such as number theory, abstract algebra, and group theory. It is also a great reference text that students can look back to when writing or reading proofs in their more advanced courses.

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