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In this book, the authors highlight the importance of eliminating health disparities and increasing the access of Native Americans to critical substance abuse and mental health services. While most chapters are framed in scientific terms, they are concerned with promoting healing through changes in the way we treat our sick-spiritually, traditionally, ceremonially, and scientifically-whether in rural areas, on reservations, and in cities. The book will be a valuable resource for medical and mental health professionals, medical anthropologists, and the Native health community. Visit our website for sample chapters!
Mental Health Care for Urban Indians: Cultural Insights from Native Practitioners is the first clinical book written by American Indian scholars working in Indian communities. This groundbreaking volume provides the reader with a basic understanding of the historical impact of colonization, the ensuing results of urban migration and boarding schools, and the effects that these events have had on the Native community. These lingering effects include a lack of cultural identity, a loss of tradition, and a sense of isolation that leads to violence, alcoholism, and often-risky behaviors. Chapter authors acknowledge this history while developing culturally sensitive practice recommendations that incorporate traditional healing methods. This will be an invaluable resource for psychologists with Native clients.
"This book presents a theoretical discussion of problems and issues encountered in the Native American community from a perspective that accepts Native knowledge as legitimate. Native American cosmology and metaphor are used extensively in order to deal with specific problems such as alcoholism, suicide, family, and community problems. The authors discuss what it means to present material from the perspective of a people who have legitimate ways of knowing and conceptualizing reality and show that it is imperative to understand intergenerational trauma and internalized oppression in order to understand the issues facing Native Americans today."--pub. website.
Drawing on two years of ethnographic field research among the Navajos, this book explores a controversial Native American ritual and healthcare practice: ceremonial consumption of the psychedelic Peyote cactus in the context of an indigenous postcolonial healing movement called the Native American Church (NAC), which arose in the 19th century in response to the creation of the reservations system and increasing societal ills, including alcoholism. The movement is the locus of cultural conflict with a long history in North America, and stirs very strong and often opposed emotions and moral interpretations. Joseph Calabrese describes the Peyote Ceremony as it is used in family contexts and federally funded clinical programs for Native American patients. He uses an interdisciplinary methodology that he calls clinical ethnography: an approach to research that involves clinically informed and self-reflective immersion in local worlds of suffering, healing, and normality. Calabrese combined immersive fieldwork among NAC members in their communities with a year of clinical work at a Navajo-run treatment program for adolescents with severe substance abuse and associated mental health problems. There he had the unique opportunity to provide conventional therapeutic intervention alongside Native American therapists who were treating the very problems that the NAC often addresses through ritual. Calabrese argues that if people respond better to clinical interventions that are relevant to their society's unique cultural adaptations and ideologies (as seems to be the case with the NAC), then preventing ethnic minorities from accessing traditional ritual forms of healing may actually constitute a human rights violation.
Multicultural Perspectives in Social Work Practice with Families is in its thirdedition and continues to expand the depth and breadth with which culturemay be understood and the impact of culture in working with families.Congress, Gonzalez, and their contributors have updated this text to includea focus on evidence-based practice, 10 additional chapters, revision of avaluable assessment tool, and a culturagram. This book clearly is an essentialresource for social workers committed to culturally sensitive practice."--Journal of Teaching in Social Work Encompassing the most current issues faced by multicultural families across the lifespan and the social workers who serve them, this popular textbook contains ten new chapters and provides content that has been significantly expanded throughout. These new and reconceived chapters offer professors and social work graduate students a broader and more comprehensive take on the key issues that arise when treating families from diverse cultural backgrounds and current, evidence-based models for assessment and treatment. New chapters include: Evidence-based models of care for ethnically-diverse families Practice with Asian-American families Practice with Native American and indigenous families Practice with Hispanic families Practice with Arab families Practice with adolescents Practice with families when there is risk of suicide Practice with families dealing with substance use and abuse Practice with families around health issues Legal issues with immigrants Contributors to the text are leaders in the field of multicultural issues that encompass a wide range of racial and ethnic populations. Updated case studies, vignettes, and statistical data illustrate the book's content.