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Geopolitics identifies and scrutinizes the central features of geopolitics from the sixteenth century to the present. The book focuses on five key concepts of the modern geopolitical imagination: * Visualising the world as a whole * The definition of geographical areas as 'advanced' or 'primitive' * The notion of the state being the highest form of political organization * The pursuit of primacy by competing states * The necessity for hierarchy.
War and Change in World Politics introduces the reader to an important new theory of international political change. Arguing that the fundamental nature of international relations has not changed over the millennia, Professor Gilpin uses history, sociology, and economic theory to identify the forces causing change in the world order. The discussion focuses on the differential growth of power in the international system and the result of this unevenness. A shift in the balance of power - economic or military - weakens the foundations of the existing system, because those gaining power see the increasing benefits and the decreasing cost of changing the system. The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change are greater than the marginal benefits. When states develop the power to change the system according to their interests they will strive to do so- either by increasing economic efficiency and maximizing mutual gain, or by redistributing wealth and power in their own favour.
A comparative study of the relationship between the end of the Cold War and the resurgence of geopolitics in Europe.
State sovereignty is an inherently social construct. This book describes, theorizes and illustrates the practices which have socially constructed, reproduced, reconstructed, and deconstructed various sovereign ideals and resistances to them.
In this, new edition of a classic work—now with a new preface—on the roots of social scientific thinking, Immanuel Wallerstein develops a thorough-going critique of the legacy of nineteenth-century social science for social thought in the new millennium. We have to "unthink"—radically revise and discard—many of the presumptions that still remain the foundation of dominant perspectives today. Once considered liberating, these notions are now barriers to a clear understanding of our social world. They include, for example, ideas built into the concept of "development." In place of such a notion, Wallerstein stresses transformations in time and space. Geography and chronology should not be regarded as external influences upon social transformations but crucial to what such transformation actually is.Unthinking Social Scienceapplies the ideas thus elaborated to a variety of theoretical areas and historical problems. Wallerstein also offers a critical discussion of the key figures whose ideas have influenced the position he formulates—including Karl Marx and Fernand Braudel, among others. In the concluding sections of the book, Wallerstein demonstrates how these new insights lead to a revision of world-systems analysis. Author note:Immanuel Wallersteinis the Director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems and Civilizations at the State University of New York at Binghamton, where he is also an emeritus Distinguished Professor of Sociology. He is currently a research sociologist at Yale University.
This original study explores the difference that space and spatiality make to the understanding of power. Explores the difference that space and spatiality makes to an understanding of power. Moves forward the incorporation of ideas of space into social theory. Presents a new understanding of the exercise, uses and manifestations of cultural, economic and political power in the second half of the twentieth century. Illustrated with cases and examples.
"A comprehensive reader for my political geography course. Good summaries at the end, and articles include effective case study examples." - Rachel Paul, Western Washington University "A very useful and comprehensive introduction to key concepts in political geography. This book provides useful context not just for 'traditional' political geography modules, but also those examining broader issues of power, resistance and social movements." - Gavin Brown, University of Leicester "Vital for introducing basic concepts and terminology in a clear and concise fashion. The short chapters are accessible and well supplemented with pertinent examples." - Daniel Hammett, Sheffield University "I found the book to be very useful in a supplemental capacity, full of information that would be useful for an undergraduate or early graduate student." - Jason Dittmer, University College London This textbook forms part of an innovative set of companion texts for the human geography subdisciplines. Organized around 20 short essays, Key Concepts in Political Geography provides a cutting-edge introduction to the central concepts that define contemporary research in the field. Involving detailed yet expansive discussions, the book includes: An introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field Over 20 key concept entries covering the expected staples of the sub-discipline, such as nationalism, territoriality, scale and political-economy, as well as relatively new arrivals to the field including the other, anti-statism, gender, and post-conflict A glossary, figures, diagrams and further reading. It is essential reading for undergraduate and postgraduate students of political geography.

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