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Geopolitics identifies and scrutinizes the central features of geopolitics from the sixteenth century to the present. The book focuses on five key concepts of the modern geopolitical imagination: * Visualising the world as a whole * The definition of geographical areas as 'advanced' or 'primitive' * The notion of the state being the highest form of political organization * The pursuit of primacy by competing states * The necessity for hierarchy.
First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
1989 signifies the collapse of Soviet communism and the end of the Cold War, a moment generally recognized as a triumph for liberal democracy and when capitalism became global. The Global 1989 challenges these ideas. An international group of prominent scholars investigate the mixed, paradoxical and even contradictory outcomes engendered by these events, unravelling the intricacies of this important moment in world history. Although the political, economic and cultural orders generated have, for the most part, been an improvement on what was in place before, this has not always been clear cut: 1989 has many meanings, many effects and multiple trajectories. This volume leads the way in defining how 1989 can be assessed both in terms of its world historical impact and in terms of its contribution to the shape of contemporary world politics.
Derek Gregory and Allan Pred's Violent Geographies gathers together a group of young and well established geographers to look at how territory and space delimit and shape both terrorism and political violence in wide range of places, from the Middle East to Latin America. In short, the book shows how physical violence, especially terrorism, disrupts the distinction between the global and the local by injecting transnational politics into the intimacies of everyday life. Violent Geographies also shows how terrorism is not simply used by nonstate groups states use it as well, including many of America's allies. It goes far beyond 9/11 moving backward in history and across the globe to other locales to get at the heightened states of emergency that are occurring everywhere.
In this, new edition of a classic work—now with a new preface—on the roots of social scientific thinking, Immanuel Wallerstein develops a thorough-going critique of the legacy of nineteenth-century social science for social thought in the new millennium. We have to "unthink"—radically revise and discard—many of the presumptions that still remain the foundation of dominant perspectives today. Once considered liberating, these notions are now barriers to a clear understanding of our social world. They include, for example, ideas built into the concept of "development." In place of such a notion, Wallerstein stresses transformations in time and space. Geography and chronology should not be regarded as external influences upon social transformations but crucial to what such transformation actually is.Unthinking Social Scienceapplies the ideas thus elaborated to a variety of theoretical areas and historical problems. Wallerstein also offers a critical discussion of the key figures whose ideas have influenced the position he formulates—including Karl Marx and Fernand Braudel, among others. In the concluding sections of the book, Wallerstein demonstrates how these new insights lead to a revision of world-systems analysis. Author note:Immanuel Wallersteinis the Director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems and Civilizations at the State University of New York at Binghamton, where he is also an emeritus Distinguished Professor of Sociology. He is currently a research sociologist at Yale University.
State sovereignty is an inherently social construct. This book describes, theorizes and illustrates the practices which have socially constructed, reproduced, reconstructed, and deconstructed various sovereign ideals and resistances to them.
War and Change in World Politics introduces the reader to an important new theory of international political change. Arguing that the fundamental nature of international relations has not changed over the millennia, Professor Gilpin uses history, sociology, and economic theory to identify the forces causing change in the world order. The discussion focuses on the differential growth of power in the international system and the result of this unevenness. A shift in the balance of power - economic or military - weakens the foundations of the existing system, because those gaining power see the increasing benefits and the decreasing cost of changing the system. The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change are greater than the marginal benefits. When states develop the power to change the system according to their interests they will strive to do so- either by increasing economic efficiency and maximizing mutual gain, or by redistributing wealth and power in their own favour.

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