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Geothermal energy stands out because it can be used as a baseload resource. This book, unlike others, examines the geology related to geothermal applications. Geology dictates (a) how geothermal resources can be found, (b) the nature of the geothermal resource (such as liquid- or vapor-dominated) and (c) how the resource might be developed ultimately (such as flash or binary geothermal plants). The compilation and distillation of geological elements of geothermal systems into a single reference fills a notable gap.
Now in its 4th edition, this single resource covers all aspects of the utilization of geothermal energy for power generation using fundamental scientific and engineering principles. Its practical emphasis is enhanced by the use of global case studies from real plants and applications from around the world that increase your understanding of geothermal energy conversion and provide a unique compilation of hard-to-obtain data and experience. Technical, economic and business aspects presented in case studies provide current and up-and-coming geothermal developers and entrepreneurs with a solid understanding of opportunities and pitfalls. Geothermal Power Plants, 4th Edition, presents state-of-the-art geothermal developments and experience of real applications for professionals, and a comprehensive reference for theory and practice. Important new and revised content on double- and triple-flash steam power plants, plant and well pumps, and biomass-geothermal and solar-geothermal hybrid systems New chapters on global case studies with comprehensive and up-to-date statistics, including New Zealand, Indonesia, Central America and the Caribbean, and the state of Nevada, USA, plus updated chapters on Larderello (Italy), The Geysers (USA), Turkey and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) make this useable and relevant for a global audience Revised and additional practice problems with emphasis on system simulation using electronic equations of state for working fluid properties. SI units are now used exclusively
Presenting boundary conditions for the economic and environmental utilization of geothermal technology, this is the first book to provide basic knowledge on the topic in such detail. The editor is the coordinator of the European Geothermic Research Initiative, while the authors are experts for the various geological situations in Europe with high temperature reservoirs in shallow and deep horizons. With its perspectives for R&D in geothermic technology concluding each chapter, this ready reference will be of great value to scientists and decision-makers in research and politics, as well as those giving courses in petroleum engineering, for example.
In the region comprising Turkey and Greece, people have been using water from geothermal sources for bathing and washing of clothes since ancient times. This region falls within the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt and hence is a locus of active volcanism and tectonism and experiences frequent seismic events. This volcanic and tectonic activity has given rise to over 1500 geothermal springs. Its importance was recognized decades ago and the geothermal water is now being utilized for district heating, industrial processing, domestic water supply, balneology and electric power generation. The geothermal potential in this region is large. In Turkey alone it is estimated to be more than 31500 MWt while the proven potential is 4078 MWt. At present 2084 MWt is being utilized for direct applications in Turkey and 135 MWt in Greece. In Turkey electricity is produced for 166 MW installed capacity, whereas in Greece geothermal energy is presently not used for electricity production despite its potential. This book discusses the geochemical evolution of the thermal waters and thermal gases in terms of the current volcano-tectonic setting and associated geological framework that makes the region very important to the geothermal scientific community. The book explains, in a didactic way, the possible applications, depending on local conditions and scales, and it presents new and stimulating ideas for future developments of this renewable energy source. Additionally, the book discusses the role(s) of possible physicochemical processes in deep hydrothermal systems, the volatile provenance and relative contributions of mantle and crustal components to total volatile inventories. It provides the reader with a thorough understanding of the geothermal systems of this region and identifi es the most suitable solutions for specifi c tasks and needs elsewhere in the world. It is the fi rst time that abundant information and data from this region, obtained from intensive research during the last few decades, is unveiled to the international geothermal community. Thus, an international readership, in the professional and academic sectors, as well as in key institutions that deal with geothermal energy, will benefit from the knowledge from geothermal research and experiences obtained from the Aegean Region.
This book explains the engineering required to bring geothermal resources into use. The book covers specifically engineering aspects that are unique to geothermal engineering, such as measurements in wells and their interpretation, transport of near-boiling water through long pipelines, turbines driven by fluids other than steam, and project economics. The explanations are reinforced by drawing comparisons with other energy industries.
Geysers. What makes them work? Many who have seen a geyser in action know only that it spouts hot water into the air. Many others have never seen one. Chapter 1, Geysers of the World, delineates their distinguishing features, locates the geyser regions of the world, and places investigations by world travelers and scientists in historic perspective. One of the quickest ways to become acquainted with a geyser is to observe it. The descriptions of several well known geysers, some based on past observations by others, but frequently by me, do not neces sarily portray current behavior. They do, however, represent general features. Geysers exist as a result of a delicate and unique interplay among the heat, the water, and the rocks of the earth. In essence, heat and water must be available, transported, distributed, stored, and finally released. Chapter 2, The Geologic, Thermal, and Hydrologic State of the Earth, especially that close to its surface, sets the stage for Chapter 3, Fundamentals of Geyser Operation. The geyser is treated here as a simple system consisting of three major interacting elements: a source of water, a source of heat, and a reservoir for storing water. The discus sion centers around the actions occurring within idealized columnar and pool geysers, and more complex systems. Some of the more workable geyser theories are evaluated.
This book introduces aqueous geochemistry applied to geothermal systems. It is specifically designed for readers first entering into the world of geothermal energy from a variety of scientific and engineering backgrounds, and consequently is not intended to be the last word on geothermal chemistry. Instead it is intended to provide readers with sufficient background knowledge to permit them to subsequently understand more complex texts and scientific papers on geothermal energy. The book is structured into two parts. The first explains how geothermal fluids and their associated chemistry evolve, and shows how the chemistry of these fluids can be used to, deduce information about the resource. The second part concentrates on survey techniques explaining how these should be performed and the procedures which need to be adopted to ensure reliable sampling and analytical data are obtained. A geothermal system requires a heat source and a fluid which transfers the heat towards the surface. The fluid could be molten rock (magma) or water. This book concentrates on the chemistry of the water, or hydrothermal, systems. Consequently, magma-energy systems are not considered. Hot-dry rock (HDR) systems are similarly outside the scope of this text, principally because they contain no indigenous fluid for study. Both magma-energy and HDR systems have potential as energy sources but await technological developments before they can be exploited commercially. Geothermal systems based on water, however, are proven energy resources which have been successfully developed throughout the world.

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