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Through a collection of case studies, the author examines why music categories and music genres are debated, and why the terms used to describe these categories and genres are always changing.
Covering the grown of twentieth-century American popular music, this work explores the question of why some music styles attain mass popularity while others thrive in small niches.
Made in Sweden: Studies in Popular Music serves as a comprehensive and rigorous introduction to the history, sociology and musicology of twentieth-century Swedish popular music. The volume consists of essays by leading scholars of Swedish popular music and covers the major figures, styles and social contexts of pop music in Swedish. Although the vast majority of the contributors are Swedish, the essays are expressly written for an international English-speaking audience. No knowledge of Swedish music or culture will be assumed. Each essay provides adequate context so readers understand why the figure or genre under discussion is of lasting significance to Swedish popular music; each section features a brief introduction by the volume editors. The book presents a general description of the history and background of Swedish popular music, followed by essays that are organized into thematic sections: The Historical Development of the Swedish Popular-Music Mainstream; The Swedishness of Swedish Popular-Music Genres; Professionalization and Diversification; and Swedish Artist Personas. Contributors: Jonas Bjälesjö Alf Björnberg Thomas Bossius Peter Dahlén Olle Edström Karin L. Eriksson Rasmus Fleischer Sverker Hyltén-Cavallius Lars Lilliestam Ulf Lindberg Morten Michelsen Susanna Nordström Marita Rhedin Henrik Smith-Sivertsen Ann Werner Kajsa Widegren
This volume of essays by the distinguished musicologist Charles Hamm focuses on the context of popular music and its interrelationships with other styles and genres, including classical music, the meaning of popular music for audiences, and the institutional appropriation of this music for hegemonic purposes. Specific topics include the use of popular song to rouse anti-slavery sentiment in mid-nineteenth-century America, the reception of such African-American styles and genres as rock 'n' roll and soul music by the black population of South Africa, the question of genre in the early songs of Irving Berlin, the attempts by the governments of South Africa and China to impose specific bodies of music on their populations, and the impact of modernist modes of thought on writing about popular music.
The contributors to Cumbia! look at particular manifestations of cumbia through their disciplinary lenses of musicology, sociology, history, anthropology, linguistics, and literary criticism.
The term 'Popular Music' has traditionally denoted different things in France and Britain. In France, the very concept of 'popular' music has been fiercely debated and contested, whereas in Britain and more largely throughout what the French describe as the 'Anglo-saxon' world 'popular music' has been more readily accepted as a description of what people do as leisure or consume as part of the music industry, and as something that academics are legitimately entitled to study. French researchers have for some decades been keenly interested in reading British and American studies of popular culture and popular music and have often imported key concepts and methodologies into their own work on French music, but apart from the widespread use of elements of 'French theory' in British and American research, the 'Anglo-saxon' world has remained largely ignorant of particular traditions of the study of popular music in France and specific theoretical debates or organizational principles of the making and consuming of French musics. French, British and American research into popular music has thus coexisted – with considerable cross-fertilization – for many years, but the barriers of language and different academic traditions have made it hard for French and anglophone researchers to fully appreciate the ways in which popular music has developed in their respective countries and the perspectives on its study adopted by their colleagues. This volume provides a comparative and contrastive perspective on popular music and its study in France and the UK.

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