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From the Calculus to Set Theory traces the development of the calculus from the early seventeenth century through its expansion into mathematical analysis to the developments in set theory and the foundations of mathematics in the early twentieth century. It chronicles the work of mathematicians from Descartes and Newton to Russell and Hilbert and many, many others while emphasizing foundational questions and underlining the continuity of developments in higher mathematics. The other contributors to this volume are H. J. M. Bos, R. Bunn, J. W. Dauben, T. W. Hawkins, and K. Møller-Pedersen.
Collection of essays on the history of mathematics by distinguished authorities.
One of the greatest revolutions in mathematics occurred when Georg Cantor (1845-1918) promulgated his theory of transfinite sets. This revolution is the subject of Joseph Dauben's important studythe most thorough yet writtenof the philosopher and mathematician who was once called a "corrupter of youth" for an innovation that is now a vital component of elementary school curricula. Set theory has been widely adopted in mathematics and philosophy, but the controversy surrounding it at the turn of the century remains of great interest. Cantor's own faith in his theory was partly theological. His religious beliefs led him to expect paradoxes in any concept of the infinite, and he always retained his belief in the utter veracity of transfinite set theory. Later in his life, he was troubled by recurring attacks of severe depression. Dauben shows that these played an integral part in his understanding and defense of set theory.
Paradoxes of the Infinite presents one of the most insightful, yet strangely unacknowledged, mathematical treatises of the 19th century: Dr Bernard Bolzano’s Paradoxien. This volume contains an adept translation of the work itself by Donald A. Steele S.J., and in addition an historical introduction, which includes a brief biography as well as an evaluation of Bolzano the mathematician, logician and physicist.
Originally published in 1921, this rigorous two-volume work traces ancient Greek mathematics from Thales of Miletus to Diophantus of Alexandria.
A comprehensive and intriguing account of the evolution of arithmetic and geometry, trigonometry and algebra, explores the interconnections among mathematics, physics, and mathematical astronomy and provides a history of the discipline from a new perspective. Originally published as The Norton History of the Mathematical Sciences. Reprint.
"Will delight a broad spectrum of readers." ? American Mathematical Monthly Do long division as the ancient Egyptians did! Solve quadratic equations like the Babylonians! Study geometry just as students did in Euclid's day! This unique text offers students of mathematics an exciting and enjoyable approach to geometry and number systems. Written in a fresh and thoroughly diverting style, the text ? while designed chiefly for classroom use ? will appeal to anyone curious about mathematical inscriptions on Egyptian papyri, Babylonian cuneiform tablets, and other ancient records. The authors have produced an illuminated volume that traces the history of mathematics ? beginning with the Egyptians and ending with abstract foundations laid at the end of the 19th century. By focusing on the actual operations and processes outlined in the text, students become involved in the same problems and situations that once confronted the ancient pioneers of mathematics. The text encourages readers to carry out fundamental algebraic and geometric operations used by the Egyptians and Babylonians, to examine the roots of Greek mathematics and philosophy, and to tackle still-famous problems such as squaring the circle and various trisectorizations. Unique in its detailed discussion of these topics, this book is sure to be welcomed by a broad range of interested readers. The subject matter is suitable for prospective elementary and secondary school teachers, as enrichment material for high school students, and for enlightening the general reader. No specialized or advanced background beyond high school mathematics is required.

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